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  1. Rocky Mountain spotted fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocky_Mountain_spotted_fever

    Doxycycline (a tetracycline) is the drug of choice for patients with Rocky Mountain spotted fever, being one of the only instances doxycycline is used in children. Treatment typically consists of 100 milligrams every 12 hours, or for children under 45 kg (99 lb) at 4 mg/kg of body weight per day in two divided doses.

  2. Treatment | Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) | CDC

    www.cdc.gov/rmsf/treatment/index.html

    Oct 26, 2018 · Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a bacterial disease spread through the bite on an infected tick. Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options Skip directly to A-Z link Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

  3. Treatment | Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) | CDC

    www.cdc.gov/rmsf/healthcare-providers/treatment.html

    Information on treatment of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. Treating Children and Pregnant Women. Doxycycline is the drug of choice recommended by both CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases to treat suspected rickettsial disease in children.

  4. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Guide: Causes, Symptoms and ...

    www.drugs.com/.../rocky-mountain-spotted-fever.html

    May 18, 2020 · Rocky Mountain spotted fever is treated with one of the tetracycline drugs, usually doxycycline (sold as a generic), in adults and children over age 9. In general, tetracyclines should not be prescribed for pregnant women and children under the age of 9 because these antibiotics can permanently stain the teeth.

  5. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) in Children

    myhealth.ucsd.edu/InteractiveTools/Quizzes/90,P02538

    Feb 01, 2019 · Key points about RMSF in children. Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a bacterial infection. It’s spread by the bite of an infected tick. It’s not spread from one person to another. Common symptoms include fever, headache, sore throat, and stomach pain. Around day 3 of the illness, a non-itchy rash may appear on the wrists and ankles.

  6. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) in Children | Health ...

    www.bjsph.org/Health-Library/View-Content?contentTypeId=...

    Key points about RMSF in children. Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a bacterial infection. It’s spread by the bite of an infected tick. It’s not spread from one person to another. Common symptoms include fever, headache, sore throat, and stomach pain. Around day 3 of the illness, a non-itchy rash may appear on the wrists and ankles.

  7. Fever Facts: High Temperature Causes and Treatments

    www.webmd.com/first-aid/fevers-causes-symptoms...

    A child older than 2 has a fever that comes with rash, real discomfort, irritability, ... Some areas of the U.S. are hot spots for infections such as Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

  8. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever FAQ - Consumer Reports

    www.consumerreports.org/medical-conditions/rocky...

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is one of a group of diseases called spotted fever rickettsiosis. The bacteria that cause these spotted fevers live in organisms such as ticks, fleas, and mites ...

  9. Emerging Disease Issues - Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

    www.michigan.gov/emergingdiseases/0,4579,7-186...

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is rarely reported in Michigan. Anyone living or recreating where the ticks are present, may be at risk. Rocky Mountain spotted fever has been diagnosed throughout the U.S., however most cases are documented within the southeast and south central regions, particularly, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Tennessee, and Missouri.

  10. MOUNTAIN FEVER IN THE 1847 MORMON PIONEER COMPANIES Jay A. Aldous

    mormonhistoricsites.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/NJ9.2...

    term mountain fever indicates she would expect the read- er to be familiar with the illness. Caroline Findley, wife of James, wrote, "Young James, barely twenty caught 'mountain fever' and died in Oregon at the journey's end on December 23, 1847."6 Cornelia Sharp, on her way to Oregon in the 1850s,