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  1. Piano Concerto No.23 in A major, K.488; Piano Concerto No.24 in C minor, K.491; Piano Concerto No.25 in C major, K.503; Piano Concerto No.26 in D major, K.537 “Coronation” Piano Concerto No.27 in B ♭ major, K.595; Arrangements of Other Composers: Piano Concerto No.1 in F major, K.37 (Raupach / unknown / Honauer) Piano Concerto No.2 in B ...

    • Simone Renzi (piano)
    • Simone Renzi
    • Unknown (orchestra)
  2. Piano Concerto No.25 in C major, K.503; Piano Concerto No.26 in D major, K.537 “Coronation” Piano Concerto No.27 in B ♭ major, K.595; Arrangements of Other Composers: Piano Concerto No.1 in F major, K.37 (Raupach / unknown / Honauer) Piano Concerto No.2 in B ♭ major, K.39 (Raupach / Schobert) Piano Concerto No.3 in D major, K.40 ...

    • Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus
    • K.467
    • IWM 386
    • Piano Concerto No.21
  3. Piano Concerto No.22 in E ♭ major, K.482; Piano Concerto No.23 in A major, K.488; Piano Concerto No.24 in C minor, K.491; Piano Concerto No.25 in C major, K.503; Piano Concerto No.26 in D major, K.537 “Coronation” Piano Concerto No.27 in B ♭ major, K.595; Arrangements of Other Composers: Piano Concerto No.1 in F major, K.37 (Raupach ...

    • Hideaki Shichida (?)
    • None
    • Synthesizer
  4. The first and third of the movements are again from Raupach (Op. 1, No. 1), whilst the slow movement is based on the opening movement of Johann Schobert's Op. 17, No. 2, a composer admired by Mozart. No. 3 (K. 40) in D major. The concerto is scored for strings, piano (or harpsichord), and pairs of horns, oboes and trumpets. The movements are:

    • 1767
    • K. 37, 39–41
    • Piano Concertos
    • The Mozartian Concept of The Piano Concerto
    • Performance Considerations
    • Discography
    • Use in Films
    • Location of Autographs of The Concertos
    • Concertos Where Mozart's Own Cadenzas (and Eingänge) Are Extant
    • References

    List of concertos

    Concerto No. 7 is for three (or two) pianos and orchestra, and No. 10 is for two pianos and orchestra, leaving 21 original concertos for one piano and orchestra. 1. No. 5 in D major, K. 175(December 1773) 2. No. 6 in B♭ major, K. 238(January 1776) 3. Lodron Concerto, No. 7 in F major, K. 242for three pianos (February 1776) 4. Lützow Concerto, No. 8 in C major, K. 246(April 1776) 5. Jenamy Concerto, No. 9 in E♭ major, K. 271(January 1777) 6. No. 10 in E♭ major, K. 365/316afor two pianos (1779)...

    Origins

    Early keyboard concertos were written by, among others, C.P.E. Bach, J.C. Bach, Soler, Wagenseil, Schobert, Vanhall and Haydn. Earlier still, in the Fifth Brandenburg Concerto by J.S. Bach, the keyboard part is elevated to the most prominent position among the instruments. These works, with their alternation of orchestral tuttis and passages for solo display, in turn, owe their structure to the tradition of Baroque operatic arias, from which the first movements of Mozart's piano concertos inh...

    Early Mozart concertos

    Concertos Nos. 1–4 (K. 37, 39, 40 and 41) are orchestral and keyboard arrangements of sonata movements by other composers. The next three concertos (K. 107/1, 2 and 3), which are not numbered, are arrangements of piano sonatas by J.C. Bach (Op 5. Nos. 2, 3, and 4, all composed by 1766). Based on handwriting analysis of the autographs they are believed to date from 1771–72.[citation needed] Concerto No. 5, K. 175 from 1773 was his first real effort in the genre, and one that proved popular at...

    In the works of his mature series, Mozart created a unique conception of the piano concerto that attempted to solve the ongoing problem of how thematic material is dealt with by the orchestra and piano. With the exception of the two exceptionally fine early concertos K. 271 (Jeunehomme) and K. 414 (the "little A major"), all of his best examples ar...

    The performance of Mozart's concertos has become a topic of considerable focus in recent years, with various issues such as the size of the orchestra and its instrumentation, the cadenzas, role of the soloist as continuo and improvisationof the written piano part all coming under scrutiny.

    The discography for Mozart's piano concertos is massive. In recent years, a number of (more or less) complete sets of the concertos have been released; these include: 1. DGG: Mozart Die Klavierkonzerte. Camerata Academica des Salzburger Mozarteums. Soloist and conductor Géza Anda. Full set without Nos. 7 and 10 and the three arrangements of sonatas...

    Mozart's piano concertos have featured in the soundtracks to several films, with the slow movement of No. 21 (KV. 467) being the most popular. Its extensive use in the 1967 film Elvira Madigan about a doomed love story between a Danish tightrope walkerand a Swedish officer has led to the concerto often being referred to as "Elvira Madigan" even tod...

    The autographs of the concertos owned by Mozart's widow were purchased by Johann Anton André in 1799, and most of these passed into the collections of the Prussian State Library in Berlin in 1873. Other autographs owned by Otto Jahn had been acquired in 1869. A few parts of André's collection remained for a long time in private hands; hence, in 194...

    K. 175: Two versions for each of the first two movements.
    K. 246: Two for first movement, three for the second.
    K. 271: Two for each movement.
    K. 365: First and third movements.
    Girdlestone, C. M. 1997. Mozart's piano concertos. Cassell, London. ISBN 0-304-30043-8
    Grayson, D. 1998. Mozart piano concertos nos 20 and 21. Cambridge Music Handbooks, Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-48475-8
    Hutchings, A. 1997. A Companion to Mozart's Piano Concertos, Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-816708-3
    Mozart, W. A. Piano Concertos Nos. 1–6 in full score. Dover Publications, New York.ISBN 0-486-44191-1
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  6. Piano Concertos by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart; Piano Concerto No.5 in D major, K.175; Rondo in D major, K.382; Piano Concerto No.6 in B ♭ major, K.238; Piano Concerto No.7 in F major for 3 (or 2) Pianos, K.242 “Lodron” Piano Concerto No.8 in C major, K.246 “Lützow” Piano Concerto No.9 in E ♭ major, K.271 “Jeunehomme”