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    • Syncope (Fainting) | Johns Hopkins Medicine
      • Syncope (SINK-a-pee) is another word for fainting or passing out. Someone is considered to have syncope if they become unconscious and go limp, then soon recover. For most people, syncope occurs once in a great while, if ever, and is not a sign of serious illness.
      www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/syncope-fainting
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  2. R55 is a billable/specific ICD-10-CM code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis for reimbursement purposes. The 2022 edition of ICD-10-CM R55 became effective on October 1, 2021. This is the American ICD-10-CM version of R55 - other international versions of ICD-10 R55 may differ. Applicable To. Blackout.

  3. Oct 01, 2021 · 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 Billable/Specific Code. R40.20 is a billable/specific ICD-10-CM code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis for reimbursement purposes. The 2022 edition of ICD-10-CM R40.20 became effective on October 1, 2021. This is the American ICD-10-CM version of R40.20 - other international versions of ICD-10 R40.20 may differ.

  4. Mar 25, 2020 · Vasovagal syncope (vay-zoh-VAY-gul SING-kuh-pee) occurs when you faint because your body overreacts to certain triggers, such as the sight of blood or extreme emotional distress. It may also be called neurocardiogenic syncope. The vasovagal syncope trigger causes your heart rate and blood pressure to drop suddenly.

    • Summary
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    This page is a listing of the dispatch determinants (codes) utilized in the Priority Dispatching™ system by the National Academy of Emergency Dispatch™ (NAED™). It includes the alphanumeric codes such as 1-D-1 (i.e. 1-Delta-1), the generic text descriptors for each code, and any applicable suffixes (special situations). This list is current as of the following Priority Dispatch™ versions: MPDS® v12.2, FPDS® v7 and PPDS® v4.1.

    Protocol 1: Abdominal Pain/Problems
    Protocol 2: Allergies (Reactions)/Envenomations (Stings/Bites)
    Protocol 3: Animal Bites/Attacks
    Protocol 4: Assault/Sexual Assault
    Protocol 5: Back Pain (Non-Traumatic or Non-Recent Trauma)
    Protocol 6: Breathing Problems
    Protocol 51: Aircraft Emergency
    Protocol 52: Alarms
    Protocol 53: Service Call
    Protocol 54: Confined Space/Structure Collapse
    Protocol 55: Electrical Hazard
    Protocol 56: Elevator/Escalator Incident

    Note: For all protocols, an affix of "OCI" in the dispatch code indicates "Officer Created Incident" (e.g. 103OCI - Administrative). An affix of "X" indicates call was transferred to an outside agency (e.g. 105X - Animal). 1. Protocol 101: Abduction/Kidnapping 1. Protocol 102: Abuse/Abandonment/Neglect 1. Protocol 103: Administrative 1. Protocol 104: Alarms 1. Protocol 105: Animal 1. Protocol 106: Assault/Sexual Assault 1. Protocol 107: Assist Other Agencies 1. Protocol 108: Bomb Found/Suspicious Package 1. Protocol 109: Bomb Threat 1.1. 109-D-1 High Occupancy 1.2. 109-D-2 Low Occupancy 1.3. 109-Ω-1 Information 1.4. 109-Ω-2 Referral 1. Protocol 110: Burglary (Break and Enter)/Home Invasion 1.1. 110-E-1 Immediate life threat 1.2. 110-E-2 Person in danger (no immediate life threat) 1.3. 110-D-1 Burglary (break and enter) 1.4. 110-D-2 Home invasion 1.5. 110-B-1 Past burglary (break and enter) 1.6. 110-B-2 Past home invasion 1.7. 110-Ω-1 Information 1.8. 110-Ω-1 Referral 1.8.1. Suffixes...

  5. Syncope (SINK-a-pee) is another word for fainting or passing out. Someone is considered to have syncope if they become unconscious and go limp, then soon recover. Someone is considered to have syncope if they become unconscious and go limp, then soon recover.

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