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    • What is the feminine equivalent of Mr President?

      • Mr is sometimes combined with certain titles ( Mr President, Mr Speaker, Mr Justice, Mr Dean ). The feminine equivalent is usually Madam although Mrs is also used in some contexts. All of these except Mr Justice are used in direct address and without the name.
  1. The use of "-san" as a gender-neutral equivalent for "Mr." or "Ms." comes up when Nagito (who uses "-kun" on guys and "-san" on girls) leaves a message for the traitor (whose identity he doesn't know) addressing them as "Traitor-san," which had to be translated as "Mr. or Miss Traitor," in the English version. The traitor turns out to be a girl.

  2. Apr 04, 2016 · Using Japanese Honorific Titles (E.g. San, Sama, Kun and Chan) In Japan, most of the time people call each other by their family name rather than their given names. A Japanese honorific title is a suffix that goes after the person’s name as in “Satou (name) san (honorific)” to raise this person up.

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    What is the feminine equivalent of Mr President?

    What are the honorific names of people in Japan?

    What's the feminine equivalent of the title Mr?

    What does the honorific mean in Japanese language?

  4. Mar 03, 2020 · 2. -san. The most common formal honorific is -san, and it translates (approximately) to Ms. and Mr.. The Japanese san suffix is used among peers and in public settings, like offices or schools (unlike in the United States, coworkers and fellow students usually refer to each other formally). It’s also used for acquaintances.

  5. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Mister_(MrMr. - Wikipedia

    Mr is sometimes combined with certain titles (Mr President, Mr Speaker, Mr Justice, Mr Dean). The feminine equivalent is usually Madam although Mrs is also used in some contexts. All of these except Mr Justice are used in direct address and without the name.

  6. The most common honorific titles are similar to the English Mr, Sir, Mrs, Ms, Miss, Madam, etc. The Chinese titles, unlike in English, always follow the name of the person and can stand alone. Men. Xiānshēng 先生 (born first, Mr., Sir.): This is a term commonly used as a respectful form of address for male law enforcement officials and ...

    • Common Titles
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    • Academic and Professional Titles
    • Religious Titles
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    Master: (/ˈmɑːstər/) for boys and young men, or as a style for the heir to a Scottish peerage. It may also be used as a professional title, e.g. for the master of a college or the master of a merch...
    Mr: (/ˈmɪstər/) for men, regardless of marital status, who do not have another professional or academic title. The variant Mister, with the same pronunciation, is sometimes used to give jocular or...
    Miss: (/mɪs/) for girls, unmarried women and (in the UK) married women who continue to use their maiden name (although "Ms" is often preferred for the last two). In the UK, it has traditionally bee...
    Mrs: (/ˈmɪsɪz/ in the UK, /ˈmɪsəz/ or /ˈmɪsəs/ in the US generally, or /ˈmɪzəz/ or /ˈmɪzəs/ in the southern US) for married women who do not have another professional or academic title, an abbrevia...
    Sir: for men, formally if they have a British knighthood or if they are a baronet(used with first name or full name, never surname alone) or generally (used on its own) as a term of general respect...
    Gentleman: Originally a social rank, standing below an esquire and above a Yeoman. The term can now refer to any man of good, courteous conduct. It is only generally used as an honorific form of ad...
    Sire: a term of address for a male monarch, previously could be used for a person in a position of authority in general or a lord.
    Mistress is an archaic form of address for a woman, equivalent to Mrs. Used on its own, it was used to address the female head of a household. The titles Mrs, Miss and Ms are abbreviations derived...
    Dr: (/ˈdɒktər/) (abbreviation for Doctor) for the holder of a doctoral degree (e.g. PhD, DPhil, MD, or DO in many countries) and for medical practitioners, dentists and veterinary surgeons (includi...
    Professor: (/prəˈfɛsər/) (informally abbreviated to "prof" (/prɒf/)) for a person who holds the academic rank of professor in a university or other institution. In the UK this is a senior academic...
    QC: postnominally in written addresses for a judge or barrister who has been made a Queen's Counsel(King's Counsel (KC) during the reign of a king). QCs may have this title recorded in British pass...
    Cl (Counsel) or SCl (Senior Counsel): In some common-law jurisdictions,[which?]barristers are addressed as Counsel or Senior Counsel, as the case may be. For example, Cl Smith or SCl Smith.

    Christianity

    1. His Holiness (abbreviation HH), oral address Your Holiness, or Holy Father – the Pope and the Pope Emeritus, the Patriarch of Moscow and All Russia, Patriarch of Peć and the Serbs, Catholicos of All Armenians, Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia, Catholicos of the Holy See of Cilicia of the Armenian Apostolic Church, Malankara Orthodox Catholicosand some other Christian Patriarchs. 2. His All Holiness (abbreviation HAH), oral address Your All Holiness – the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constant...

    Judaism

    1. Rabbi: In Judaism, a rabbi /ˈræbaɪ/ is an ordained religious officiant or a teacher of Torah. This title derives from the Hebrew word רַבִּי‎ rabi [ˈʁabi], meaning "My Master" (irregular plural רבנים rabanim [ʁabaˈnim]), which is the way a student would address a master of Torah. The word "master" רב rav [ˈʁav]literally means "great one". 2. The Reverend: Was often used for rabbis, cantors, mohalim, and shochetim in English speaking countries. May sometimes be used for Jewish chaplainswho...

    Islam

    1. Imām: for Islamic clergymen, especially the ones who lead prayers and deliver sermons. 2. Shaykh: umbrella term used for those qualified in various fields of knowledge of Islam, (Informally, Bearing no relation to the religion, and in addition to its religious title, it's occasionally used as an honorary term to refer to a wealthy person or a person with authority or from the dynasty lineage synonymous with the title "Prince"). 3. Muftī: males qualified in Islamic jurisprudence with abilit...

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