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    • What is the feminine equivalent of Mr President?

      • Mr is sometimes combined with certain titles (Mr President, Mr Speaker, Mr Justice, Mr Dean). The feminine equivalent is Madam. All of these except Mr Justice are used in direct address and without the name.
  1. Apr 04, 2016 · Using Japanese Honorific Titles (E.g. San, Sama, Kun and Chan) In Japan, most of the time people call each other by their family name rather than their given names. A Japanese honorific title is a suffix that goes after the person’s name as in “Satou (name) san (honorific)” to raise this person up.

  2. Mar 03, 2020 · 2. -san. The most common formal honorific is -san, and it translates (approximately) to Ms. and Mr.. The Japanese san suffix is used among peers and in public settings, like offices or schools (unlike in the United States, coworkers and fellow students usually refer to each other formally). It’s also used for acquaintances.

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  4. Mr. Ms. and Dr. In Japanese, language pieces like these exist—the only difference is that unlike in English, Japanese titles like these are placed at the end of a person’s name. That’s why they’re called suffixes.

  5. Jun 29, 2017 · Obviously the U.S. president's wife is usually referred to as the "First Lady" rather than as "Mrs. President," but nonetheless, the title "Mrs. President" still might have the unpleasant connotation that she is married to a "Mr. President", who is the actual office-holder.

  6. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › MrMr. - Wikipedia

    Mr is sometimes combined with certain titles (Mr President, Mr Speaker, Mr Justice, Mr Dean). The feminine equivalent is usually Madam although Mrs is also used in some contexts. All of these except Mr Justice are used in direct address and without the name.

  7. Mar 22, 2015 · President is both a title and a name substitute depending on how it's used: President Obama. In this case, President is a title and it applies to Obama. Mr. President. This is often (if not always) used when addressing the president directly (assuming you aren't a close friend or family). It is the equivalent of using "Your Honor" when ...

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