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  1. Dec 10, 2020 · The creation of Upper (Ontario) and Lower Canada (Quebec) in 1791 allowed most Loyalists to live under British laws and institutions, while the French-speaking population of Lower Canada could maintain their familiar French civil law and the Catholic religion. Chronological History of Quebec [edit | edit source] The following important events ...

  2. The creation of Upper (Ontario) and Lower Canada (Quebec) in 1791 allowed most Loyalists to live under British laws and institutions, while the French-speaking population of Lower Canada could maintain their familiar French civil law and the Catholic religion. Chronological History of Quebec. The following important events affected political ...

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    Where is the Catholic Cemetery in Chateauguay, Quebec?

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    • Introduction
    • Demographic Changes
    • Non-French Settlement

    Warning

    Genealogical research in Québec has changed so much over the past thirty years that anything written before 1970 on where to locate documents, what records are open or closed, and what published sources are best, is obsolete. Even if written before 1993, information can be out of date and misleading, so always check publication dates.

    Some Thoughts on Language

    While 80 percent or more of the records and books you are likely to use are in English, or have a bilingual format, when researching in Québec you will encounter some material in French. Simply put, you must understand enough French to use the P.R.D.H. database. It is not difficult, you need a vocabulary of a few hundred words at most. Entries in Parish registers usually follow a standard format, as do most legal documents. Translate one entry and you have translated almost all except for nam...

    The Religious Divide

    Nevertheless, in Québec, the Two Solitudes of Genealogy are not Language but Religion. Official vital records are either Roman Catholic or Non-Catholic. 1. 1.1. In Québec, before 1926, all registration of vital records was done by the church. Each Parish of whatever denomination, sent a copyof their registers to the local Prothonotary Court where it served as the Civil Registration of baptisms (normally giving date of birth), marriages and burials (usually giving date of death). Most church r...

    Before the coming of the railroads, few French Canadians had settled in the Eastern Townships. Some came to work on the early railroads but in spite of increasing population pressure in the seigneuries, they avoided the region as long as there were no Catholic parishes. There were no Catholic parishes because Priests were allowed to tithe only those who held lands under seigneurial tenure. The Clergy Reserves were for the support of the Protestant Clergy. This changed with an ordinance in 1839, “confirmed by an act of the Canadian Legislature in 1849”, and once it could establish Parishes, the Catholic Church encouraged new settlements in Québec rather than see their young parishioners emigrate to find work in New England factories.

    What a Difference a Railroad Made

    The demography of rural Québec changed radically and rapidly with the coming of the Railroads. A new era had begun. The Townships were no longer isolated, but on a direct route from Montréal to the sea. On Thursday, 21 July 1836, the first railway train in Canada pulled two coaches from La Prairie, on the St. Lawrence, to St. Johns on the Richelieu River. The average speed on that first round trip was 14.5 m.p.h. but it provided a direct link of the water-route to New York. The St. Lawrence a...

    Twentieth Century Changes

    In the 20th century, the importance of the railways declined as the truck and automobile took over. Railway passenger service became unprofitable after World War II and now only the main freight lines cross the Townships. Concession roads became highways, widened and paved, with corners rounded and hills smoothed. A few still wander off over the hills looking much as they did a hundred years ago, but these backroads now lead not to overgrown farms with old houses showing only traces of past p...

    Years of Settlement

    Remember the words of Senator Forsey who told us where to find the “English”: 1. 1.1. In Canada East, …people of English, Scotch and Irish origin made up well over 20 percent of the population in 1867. Montréal was more than half “English,” Québec City about 45 percent, the Eastern Townships were overwhelmingly “English,” and there was a substantial “English” minority in Gaspé and several other counties [Ottawa River valley].

  4. The Quebec Family History Society is the largest English-language genealogical society in Quebec, Canada, encouraging the study of family history in Canada, British Isles, France, Europe & the U.S.

  5. Nov 13, 2019 · A large catholic cemetery on the east side of Châteauguay, near the border of the Kahnawake Indian Reserve. It is located on the east side of Rue Elm Sud, north of Boul. St-Francis. (45.377N/ 73.728W) It is associated with the Franciscan Monastery located in Châteauguay Heights. Cimetière de St-Joachim-de-Châteauguay.

  6. Cemeteries in Quebec, Roman Catholic cemeteries in Canada, Buildings and structures in Quebec City Aérodrome Saint-Louis. The Aérodrome Saint-Louis, also called Aérodrome du Bois Gomin or Canadian Transcontinental Airways Airport, was the first airfield of the Quebec City area of Quebec, Canada. It was located in the suburb of Sainte-Foy.