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      • The Kingdom of Galicia (Galician: Reino de Galicia, or Galiza; Spanish: Reino de Galicia; Portuguese: Reino da Galiza; Latin: Galliciense Regnum) was a political entity located in southwestern Europe, which at its territorial zenith occupied the entire northwest of the Iberian Peninsula.
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  2. Kingdom of Galicia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Kingdom_of_Galicia

    The Kingdom of Galicia ( Galician: Reino de Galicia, or Galiza; Spanish: Reino de Galicia; Portuguese: Reino da Galiza; Latin: Galliciense Regnum) was a political entity located in southwestern Europe, which at its territorial zenith occupied the entire northwest of the Iberian Peninsula.

    • Monarchy
    • Junta
  3. Galicia (Spain) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Galicia_(Spain)

    Galicia (/ ɡ ə ˈ l ɪ ʃ (i) ə /; Galician: Galicia [ɡaˈliθjɐ] or Galiza [ɡaˈliθɐ]; Spanish: Galicia, Portuguese: Galiza) is an autonomous community of Spain and historic nationality under Spanish law. Located in the northwest Iberian Peninsula, it includes the provinces of A Coruña, Lugo, Ourense and Pontevedra.

  4. Kingdom of Galicia | Project Gutenberg Self-Publishing ...

    self.gutenberg.org › articles › Kingdom_of_Galicia
    • Origin and Foundation
    • Suebic Kingdom
    • Visigothic Monarchy
    • Early and High Middle Ages
    • Notes
    • Medieval Cartography
    • Symbols of The Kingdom
    • Modern Age
    • Late Middle Ages

    The origin of the kingdom lies in the 5th century, when the Suebi settled permanently in the former Roman province of Gallaecia. Their king, Hermeric, probably signed a foedus, or pact, with the Roman Emperor Honorius, which conceded them lands in Galicia. The Suebi set their capital in the former Bracara Augusta, setting the foundations of a kingdom which was first acknowledged as Regnum Suevorum (Kingdom of the Suebi), but later as Regnum Galliciense(Kingdom of Galicia). A century later, the differences between Gallaeci and Suebi people had faded, leading to the systematic use of terms like Galliciense Regnum (Galician Kingdom), Regem Galliciae (King of Galicia), Rege Suevorum (King of Suebi), and Galleciae totius provinciae rex (king of all Galician provinces), while bishops, such as Martin of Braga, were recognized as episcopi Gallaecia(Bishop of Galicia).

    The independent Suebic kingdom of Galicia lasted from 410 to 585, having remained a relatively stable for most of that time.

    In 585, Liuvigild, the Visigothic king of Hispania and Septimania, annexed the Kingdom of Galicia, after defeating King Audeca, and later the pretender to the throne, Malaric. Thus the kingdom of the Suebi, which incorporated large territories of the ancient Roman provinces of Gallaecia and Lusitania, became the sixth province of the Visigothic Kingdom of Toledo. The government of the Visigoths in Galicia did not totally disrupt the society, and the Suevi Catholic dioceses of Asturica, Conimbria, Lameco, Viseu, and Egitania continued to operate normally. During the reign of Liuvigild, new Arian bishops were raised among the Suebi in cities such as Lugo, Porto, Tui, and Viseu, alongside the cities' Catholic bishops. These Arian bishops returned to Catholicism in 589, when King Reccared himself converted to Catholicism, along with the Goths and Suebi, at the Third Council of Toledo. The territorial and administrative organization inherited from the Suevi was incorporated into the new...

    For several centuries after the defeat of the Goths, Galicia was united with other neighboring regions under the same monarchs, with only brief periods of separation under different kings. Along with the rest of the northwest of the Iberian Peninsula, it was free of Arab presence from the mid-8th century, being gradually incorporated into a growing Christian state. This is usually called the Kingdom of Asturias in traditional and modern sources, although the precise historical details of these events have been obscured by the national mythsleading to the construction of modern Spanish identity. The 9th century saw this state expand southward, with Castilian and Asturian noblemen acquiring most of the northern Coimbra, by noblemen mostly proceeding from northern Galicia. Also significant was the pretrended discovery of the tomb of Saint James the Great at what would become Santiago de Compostela; the shrine constructed there became the religious center of the nation, as well as being...

    The Kingdom of Galicia in medieval cartography
    In Liber Floridus (1125), by Lambert of Saint-Omer, showing the names Galitia, Hispania, Lusitania, and Wasconia, among others
    In Tabula Rogeriana (1154), by Muhammad al-Idrisi, showing the name Ard Galika
    Arms of the Kings of Galicia, Segar's Roll, 13th century
    Arms of the kingdom of Galicia in the "Great Triumphal Chariot of Maximilian", Year 1515.
    Arms of the kingdom of Galicia in the Historia originis et succesionis regnorum et imperiorum a Noe usque ad Carolum V, 1548.
    Arms of the kingdom od Galicia, Le blason des Armoiries, Year 1581

    The Kingdom of Galicia and the Junta continued to formally exist until the State Liberal Reform of 1833, at the time of the provincial division under the regency of Maria Christina of the Two Sicilies. Galicia regained its territorial unity for twenty-four days by the constitution of the Junta de Gobierno de Galicia following a liberal armed uprising in 1846, the Mártires de Carral, but never regained the status of a kingdom.

    The establishment in 1500 of the Real Audiencia del Reino de Galicia (a permanent royal tribunal), and later the forced reformation and submission of the Galician monasteries to the Castilian ones, represented the integration de factoof the Kingdom of Galicia in the Crown of Castile. From 1480 to 1485, the Santa Hermandad and the new official, endorsed with local supporters, worked jointly harassing economically and militarily the noblemen, who were largely against the new order impulsed by the Monarchs. But the resistance was ended with the dead of their leader, the Count of Lemos, together with the wars fought and gained against Marshal Pardo de Cela and Count Pedro Madruga; the first one was beheaded in Mondoñedo in 1483, whilst Pedro was deposed in 1485 by his own son, Álvaro, a long shot to save the lineage of Soutomaior. This corps, reinforced with mercenary troops and under the pretension of pacifying the country and getting rid of adventurers and thieves, was also used as fi...

    Royal pantheon of the
    Sepulcher of count Raymond of Burgundy, lord of Galicia (Totius Galletie Imperator)(d. 1107)
    Sepulcher of king Alfonso IX (Rex Legionis et Gallecie) (d. 1230)
    Sepulcher of count Pedro Fróilaz de Traba (Orbem Galletie Imperante), protector of king Alfonso VII(d. 1128)
  5. About: Kingdom of Galicia

    dbpedia.org › resource › Kingdom_of_Galicia

    The Kingdom of Galicia (Galician: Reino de Galicia, or Galiza; Spanish: Reino de Galicia; Portuguese: Reino da Galiza; Latin: Galliciense Regnum) was a political entity located in southwestern Europe, which at its territorial zenith occupied the entire northwest of the Iberian Peninsula.

  6. Kingdom of the Suebi - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Suebi_Kingdom_of_Galicia

    The Kingdom of the Suebi ( Latin: Regnum Suevorum ), also called the Kingdom of Gallæcia ( Latin: Regnum Gallæciae) or Suebi Kingdom of Gallæcia ( Latin: Gallaecia suevorum regnum ), was a Germanic post-Roman kingdom that was one of the first to separate from the Roman Empire.

  7. About: Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia

    dbpedia.org › page › Kingdom_of_Galicia–Volhynia

    Roman the Great united the principalities of Halych (Galicia) and Volhynia into a state that existed from 1199 to 1349. Along with Novgorod and Vladimir-Suzdal, it was one of the three most important powers to emerge from the collapse of Kievan Rus'.

  8. Timeline of Galician history - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Timeline_of_Galician_History

    Ordoño II of Galicia, becomes King of Kingdom of León, after the death of his brother García I of León. The capital city of the Kingdom of Asturias is moved from Oviedo to León, from now on Kingdom of León. Kingdom of Galicia inside Kingdom of León. 916 - Ordoño II of León is defeated by the Emir Abd-ar-Rahman III in Valdejunquera.

  9. Kingdom of Galicia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    22-mrt-2014 - Kingdom of Galicia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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