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      • Systemic illness caused by microbial invasion of normally sterile parts of the body is referred to as “sepsis.” This is a term that specifically serves to differentiate an illness of microbial origin from an identical clinical syndrome that can arise in several non-microbial conditions, of which pancreatitis is the archetype.
      www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2043413/
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  2. Oct 27, 2007 · Systemic illness caused by microbial invasion of normally sterile parts of the body is referred to as “sepsis.” This is a term that specifically serves to differentiate an illness of microbial origin from an identical clinical syndrome that can arise in several non-microbial conditions, of which pancreatitis is the archetype.

    • Andrew Lever, Iain Mackenzie
    • Andrew Lever, Iain Mackenzie
    • 2007
    • 2007 Oct
  3. Sepsis is the body’s extreme response to an infection. It is a life-threatening medical emergency. Sepsis happens when an infection you already have triggers a chain reaction throughout your body. Infections that lead to sepsis most often start in the lung, urinary tract, skin, or gastrointestinal tract.

  4. Mar 21, 2019 · Sepsis is a systemic response to infection, manifested by two or more of the SIRS criteria as a result of infection. Severe sepsis: Sepsis associated with organ dysfunction, hypoperfusion, or hypotension; hypoperfusion and perfusion abnormalities may include, but not limited to, lactic acidosis, oliguria, or an acute alteration in mental status

    • Bishal Gyawali, Karan Ramakrishna, Amit S Dhamoon
    • 2019
  5. Oct 25, 2007 · Systemic illness caused by microbial invasion of normally sterile parts of the body is referred to as “sepsis.” This is a term that specifically serves to differentiate an illness of microbial origin from an identical clinical syndrome that can arise in several non-microbial conditions, of which pancreatitis is the archetype.

    • Andrew Lever, Iain Mackenzie
    • 2007