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  2. COVID-19 Symptoms Usually Show Up in This Order

    www.healthline.com › health-news › covid-19-symptoms

    “The onset of nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea after onset of respiratory symptoms such as fever and cough may also suggest that a person may have COVID-19.” According to Glatter, the bottom line is...

    • George Citroner
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  4. Roseola - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org › diseases-conditions › roseola
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Risk Factors
    • Complications
    • Prevention

    Roseola is a generally mild infection that usually affects children by age 2. It occasionally affects adults. Roseola is so common that most children have been infected with roseola by the time they enter kindergarten.Two common strains of the herpes virus cause roseola. The condition typically causes several days of fever, followed by a rash.Some children develop only a very mild case of roseola and never show any clear indication of illness, while others experience the full range of signs a...

    If your child is exposed to someone with roseola and becomes infected with the virus, it generally takes a week or two for signs and symptoms of infection to appear — if they appear at all. It's possible to become infected with roseola, but have signs and symptoms too mild to be readily noticeable. Roseola symptoms may include: 1. Fever. Roseola typically starts with a sudden, high fever — often greater than 103 F (39.4 C). Some children also may have a sore throat, runny nose or cough along...

    The most common cause of roseola is the human herpes virus 6, but the cause also can be another herpes virus — human herpes virus 7.Like other viral illnesses, such as a common cold, roseola spreads from person to person through contact with an infected person's respiratory secretions or saliva. For example, a healthy child who shares a cup with a child who has roseola could contract the virus.Roseola is contagious even if no rash is present. That means the condition can spread while an infec...

    Older infants are at greatest risk of acquiring roseola because they haven't had time yet to develop their own antibodies against many viruses. While in the uterus, babies receive antibodies from their mothers that protect them as newborns from contracting infections, such as roseola. But this immunity decreases with time. The most common age for a child to contract roseola is between 6 and 15 months.

    Occasionally a child with roseola experiences a seizure brought on by a rapid rise in body temperature. If this happens, your child might briefly lose consciousness and jerk his or her arms, legs or head for several seconds to minutes. He or she may also lose bladder or bowel control temporarily.If your child has a seizure, seek emergency care. Although frightening, fever-related seizures in otherwise healthy young children are generally short-lived and are rarely harmful.Complications from r...

    Because there's no vaccine to prevent roseola, the best you can do to prevent the spread of roseola is to avoid exposing your child to an infected child. If your child is sick with roseola, keep him or her home and away from other children until the fever has broken.Most people have antibodies to roseola by the time they're of school age, making them immune to a second infection. Even so, if one household member contracts the virus, make sure that all family members wash their hands frequentl...

  5. COVID Symptoms Usually Appear In This Order

    www.yahoo.com › lifestyle › covid-symptoms-usually
    • First: Fever. The first symptom and one of the most common symptoms of COVID is generally a spike in temperature. While some people only experience a slight increase, others report a full blown fever over 100.4.
    • Second: Cough. Another trademark symptom of COVID that people report directly after a fever is a cough. Unlike the wet, mucusy cough of other illnesses, the one associated with the virus is drier in nature.
    • Third: Sore Throat. There are three symptoms that occur after a fever and cough, and can arise simultaneously or independently. The first of them? A sore throat.
    • Also Third: Headache. One of the other three symptoms of the group is a headache. According to one study, headache was reported in 11 to 34 percent of the hospitalized COVID-19 patients and around 6 to 10 percent of all symptomatic patients.
    • Fever. A fever is one way your body fights off disease. It's also the first sign of coronavirus. "Although a fever technically is any body temperature above the normal of 98.6 F (37 C), in practice a person is usually not considered to have a significant fever until the temperature is above 100.4 F (38 C)," reports MedicineNet.
    • Cough. You will likely experience this next. What does a COVID-19 cough feel like and sound like? "Considering that COVID-19 irritates lung tissue, the cough is dry and persistent.
    • Muscle Pain. This is likely to come after the fever and the cough. "Muscle pain—often caused by muscle inflammation (myositis)—isn't an uncommon symptom for a viral infection," according to Health.
    • Nausea and/or Vomiting. After the first three symptoms, you may feel sick to your stomach. “The upper GI tract (i.e., nausea/vomiting) seems to be affected before the lower GI tract (i.e., diarrhea) in COVID-19, which is the opposite from MERS and SARS,” the scientists wrote.
  6. Roseola Rash, Symptoms & Virus Treatment

    www.emedicinehealth.com › roseola › article_em
    • Cause
    • Signs and symptoms
    • Treatment
    • Diagnosis
    • Prevention
    • Names

    Roseola is primarily caused by a virus called human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and less commonly by human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7). These viruses are different from the viruses that cause genital herpes and cold sores, although they belong to the same family of viruses. While roseola is spread from person to person, the exact mechanism of transmission is not well defined. Experts postulate that respiratory secretions are most likely involved. The incubation period between virus exposure and onset of symptoms (fever, etc.) is nine to 10 days

    The signs and symptoms of HHV-6 (or HHV-7) infection vary depending upon the age of the patient. Infants and toddlers routinely will develop a sudden high fever that lasts for three to five days. In addition, irritability, swollen glands (lymph nodes) in the front or back of the neck, runny nose, and possibly mild diarrhea may be present. Within 12-24 hours of the fever breaking, a rash rapidly appears. The rash is mainly located on the neck, abdomen, and trunk/back but may extend to the extremities. The rash appears as separate, raised 3 mm-5 mm lesions (papules) or as similarly sized flat (macular) spots. The skin is mildly red in color and temporarily blanches with pressure. The rash is not itchy or painful. The rash is not contagious, and it lasts for one to two days and does not return.

    While the seizure may look very frightening, it is usually quite harmless (benign). Febrile seizures are not associated with long-term neurological side effects or brain damage. Anticonvulsant medication is rarely prescribed either to treat or prevent febrile seizures. A very important responsibility is to keep calm and help the child to the floor and loosen any clothing around the neck. Turn the child on one side so saliva can flow from the mouth. Protect his head against the hard ground by use of a cushion or pillow. Do not put anything in the child's mouth. It is impossible to swallow your tongue. Children are often drowsy and desire to sleep following a seizure. After the seizure, you should contact the child's health-care provider to determine if your child should be immediately examined.

    Since the diagnosis of roseola is generally made by the characteristic history and physical examination findings, laboratory studies and/or radiologic evaluation are rarely necessary. In the unusual case, laboratory testing exists to demonstrate elevation of antibodies to HHV-6 (or HHV-7). This may be necessary if the patient's immune system is compromised.

    Prevention of roseola is difficult because during the incubation period (time between exposure to the virus and development of symptoms) the infected child is contagious but has no symptoms. General health awareness and avoidance of ill and febrile children will lessen the exposure risk to roseola and other infectious diseases. No vaccine exists to prevent roseola. Since this is a viral infection, antibiotics are of no value. Routine antiviral agents (for example, acyclovir) have minimal effect and are not recommended.

    Over the years, roseola has had several different names including roseola infantum, roseola infantilis, and exanthem subitum. In the past, roseola was also called sixth disease, underscoring the fact that it was one of the six childhood viral skin infections, and the illness lasts for approximately six days. Other childhood diseases that were once known only by a numerical name include scarlet fever, measles, and German measles.

  7. Symptoms of Coronavirus: Early Signs, Serious Symptoms and More

    www.webmd.com › lung › covid-19-symptoms

    COVID-19 is a respiratory condition caused by a coronavirus. Some people are infected but don’t notice any symptoms. Most people will have mild symptoms and get better on their own. But about 1 in...

  8. Apr 28, 2020 · Research studies have found the virus has an incubation period of up to 14 days. Although COVID-19 symptoms can show up as early as one day or as late as 14 days after exposure, the average ...

  9. Oct 08, 2020 · Mild symptoms of Covid-19 can include fever, cough, sore throat, malaise, headache, muscle pain, congestion or runny nose, loss of taste or smell, and diarrhea, according to the US Centers for...

  10. Coronavirus Symptoms May Take 5 or More Days

    www.aarp.org › onset-of-covid-19-symptoms

    Mar 12, 2020 · En español | On average, it takes 5.1 days from the point of infection before the onset of symptoms of COVID-19, according to the latest estimates by researchers studying the epidemiology of the new coronavirus.

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