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  1. Roseola - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/roseola/...
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Risk Factors
    • Complications
    • Prevention

    Roseola is a generally mild infection that usually affects children by age 2. It occasionally affects adults. Roseola is so common that most children have been infected with roseola by the time they enter kindergarten.Two common strains of the herpes virus cause roseola. The condition typically causes several days of fever, followed by a rash.Some children develop only a very mild case of roseola and never show any clear indication of illness, while others experience the full range of signs a...

    If your child is exposed to someone with roseola and becomes infected with the virus, it generally takes a week or two for signs and symptoms of infection to appear — if they appear at all. It's possible to become infected with roseola, but have signs and symptoms too mild to be readily noticeable. Roseola symptoms may include: 1. Fever. Roseola typically starts with a sudden, high fever — often greater than 103 F (39.4 C). Some children also may have a sore throat, runny nose or cough along...

    The most common cause of roseola is the human herpes virus 6, but the cause also can be another herpes virus — human herpes virus 7.Like other viral illnesses, such as a common cold, roseola spreads from person to person through contact with an infected person's respiratory secretions or saliva. For example, a healthy child who shares a cup with a child who has roseola could contract the virus.Roseola is contagious even if no rash is present. That means the condition can spread while an infec...

    Older infants are at greatest risk of acquiring roseola because they haven't had time yet to develop their own antibodies against many viruses. While in the uterus, babies receive antibodies from their mothers that protect them as newborns from contracting infections, such as roseola. But this immunity decreases with time. The most common age for a child to contract roseola is between 6 and 15 months.

    Occasionally a child with roseola experiences a seizure brought on by a rapid rise in body temperature. If this happens, your child might briefly lose consciousness and jerk his or her arms, legs or head for several seconds to minutes. He or she may also lose bladder or bowel control temporarily.If your child has a seizure, seek emergency care. Although frightening, fever-related seizures in otherwise healthy young children are generally short-lived and are rarely harmful.Complications from r...

    Because there's no vaccine to prevent roseola, the best you can do to prevent the spread of roseola is to avoid exposing your child to an infected child. If your child is sick with roseola, keep him or her home and away from other children until the fever has broken.Most people have antibodies to roseola by the time they're of school age, making them immune to a second infection. Even so, if one household member contracts the virus, make sure that all family members wash their hands frequentl...

  2. Roseola: Symptoms, causes, and treatment

    www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/320357

    Dec 19, 2017 · Symptoms include fever, runny nose, cough, and sore throat. A rash starts to occur when the fever ends. Roseola is not usually a serious condition. It typically resolves within a week or so after...

    • Jayne Leonard
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  4. Roseola (Sixth Disease): Symptoms, Causes, Treatment & Prevention

    my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/15785...

    Symptoms of roseola appear about ten days after infection. The first sign of illness is a high fever (often above 103° F or 39.5° C). This fever can last from three to seven days. Once the fever goes away, a rash often appears on their stomach that may spread to their back, neck and arms.

  5. Roseola Symptoms and Signs: Causes - eMedicineHealth

    www.emedicinehealth.com/roseola/symptom.htm

    Doctor's Notes on Roseola. Roseola is a mild viral illness of sudden onset and short duration that most frequently affects young children. It is most commonly seen in children age 6 to 24 months. Less frequently, older children, teens, and adults may be infected. Symptoms of roseola depend on the age of the patient.

  6. A child may not have any symptoms for 5-15 days after getting the virus that causes roseola. When symptoms do appear, the first thing you’ll notice is a sudden, high fever (over 103 F) that ...

  7. Dizziness - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dizziness/...
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Risk Factors
    • Complications

    Dizziness is a term used to describe a range of sensations, such as feeling faint, woozy, weak or unsteady. Dizziness that creates the false sense that you or your surroundings are spinning or moving is called vertigo.Dizziness is one of the more common reasons adults visit their doctors. Frequent dizzy spells or constant dizziness can significantly affect your life. But dizziness rarely signals a life-threatening condition.Treatment of dizziness depends on the cause and your symptoms. It's u...

    People experiencing dizziness may describe it as any of a number of sensations, such as: 1. A false sense of motion or spinning (vertigo) 2. Lightheadedness or feeling faint 3. Unsteadiness or a loss of balance 4. A feeling of floating, wooziness or heavy-headednessThese feelings may be triggered or worsened by walking, standing up or moving your head. Your dizziness may be accompanied by nausea or be so sudden or severe that you need to sit or lie down. The episode may last seconds or days a...

    Dizziness has many possible causes, including inner ear disturbance, motion sickness and medication effects. Sometimes it's caused by an underlying health condition, such as poor circulation, infection or injury.The way dizziness makes you feel and your triggers provide clues for possible causes. How long the dizziness lasts and any other symptoms you have also help pinpoint the cause.

    Factors that may increase your risk of getting dizzy include: 1. Age. Older adults are more likely to have medical conditions that cause dizziness, especially a sense of imbalance. They're also more likely to take medications that can cause dizziness. 2. A past episode of dizziness. If you've experienced dizziness before, you're more likely to get dizzy in the future.

    Dizziness can increase your risk of falling and injuring yourself. Experiencing dizziness while driving a car or operating heavy machinery can increase the likelihood of an accident. You may also experience long-term consequences if an existing health condition that may be causing your dizziness goes untreated.

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