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      • Scandinavian country from Dane, the people's name, + Danish mark "border" (see mark (n.1)). The modern form is attested from late 14c. (from earlier Denemarke, c. 1200, from Old English Dene-mearce), but originally it meant western Scandinavia generally, "the lands of the Danes and Northmen."
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    What is the Danish border to Germany?

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  2. denmark | Search Online Etymology Dictionary

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    Scandinavian country from Dane, the people's name, + Danish mark "border" (see mark (n.1)). The modern form is attested from late 14c. The modern form is attested from late 14c. (from earlier Denemarke , c. 1200, from Old English Dene-mearce ), but originally it meant western Scandinavia generally, "the lands of the Danes and Northmen."

  3. Etymology of Denmark - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Etymology_of_Denmark

    The etymology of the name Denmark (Danish: Danmark), and especially the relationship between Danes and Denmark and the unifying of Denmark as a single kingdom, is a subject which attracts some debate. In Old Norse, the country was called Danmǫrk, referring to the Danish March, viz. the marches of the Danes. The Latin and Greek name is Dania.

  4. Scandinavian country from Dane, the people's name, + Danish mark "border" (see mark (n.1)). The modern form is attested from late 14c. The modern form is attested from late 14c. (from earlier Denemarke , c. 1200, from Old English Dene-mearce ), but originally it meant western Scandinavia generally, "the lands of the Danes and Northmen."

  5. Schleswig-Holstein German or Danish • FamilySearch

    www.familysearch.org › wiki › en
    • German Or Danish?
    • Timeline
    • Political History
    • Language
    • Conclusion
    • Online Resources

    How might you determine the nationality of an ancestor whose information came on a printed form in German, but whose dates and places were handwritten in Danish and the issuing administration was located in a city which lies unequivocally in Danish territory? Is he German or Danish because of historical, political, cultural or genetic origins? In the final analysis would you call him Danish or German? Here are a few thoughts:

    9th centuryThe Danish Kingdom borders on the Frankish Empire (roughly modern Holstein) 12th centurySchleswig becomes a duchy of Denmark, Holstein a German duchy 18th century Under Frederik IV (1773) the two duchies become Danish territories 1864Denmark loses the war against Prussia and Austria, and so has to relinquish the two duchies. Nordschleswig (Sønderjylland) becomes Prussian property. Holstein falls to Austria. Schleswig-Holstein becomes a Kondominium(joined governance over an area) 1867Schleswig-Holstein becomes a Prussian province 1920A vote is taken by the population of Sønderjylland. The majority of the people vote to be part of Denmark. The border between Denmark and Germany changes to present specifications.

    When Denmark ruled over the two duchies, Schleswig and Holstein, the political fusion was a Personal Union (relationship between separate, sovereign states where each kept their own laws). Schleswig and Holstein were often parceled between royal linesHowever, each ruler would implement the laws and agreements of the Personal Union. They all would adhere to the same person as their head of state, the King of Denmark. The duchies were administered by the “Deutsche Kanzlei” in Kopenhagen.

    With the integration of Schleswig-Holstein into the Prussian state, the question of nationality was raised again and became the reason of much dispute. The language of the educated was German. Since the Reformation an education was a German one. The language of the people is "Niedersächsisch" (Low German). In the Frisian districts of Schleswig approx. 28,000 speak Frisian, in the north of Schleswig, except in the cities, people speak Plattdänisch (a form of Danish dialect). Here for approx. 110,000 people Danish is the language in church and school. (see Staatshandbuch für die Herzogthümer Schleswig-Holstein). In 1832 the Danes ordered Danish to be the judicial and administrative language where it was spoken in churches and taught in schools. In Sønderjylland (Nordschleswig) Danish news papers and libraries and an institution of higher learning (Rödding) were established. In 1840 Danish was the official language. By 1848 the border between the Danish and German languages became that...

    The historical, cultural and linguistic situation in the geographical area around the present-day border between Denmark and Germany has been so fluid and complex, that it might be difficult to make a definite pronouncement on an ancestor’s nationality. Perhaps additional family records or information reveal which language was used in the home. This might well end up being the most useful criterion for deciding.

    Arbeitskreis Volkszahl-Register is a volunteer group transcribing census records. On their homepage is a section named Toppgrafie Schleswig-Holstein 1854 where you can find links to two PDF files, Beschreibungen and Ortewhich link to brief histories and descriptions of the places in the Duchies of Schleswig, Holstein and Lauenburg, the Principality of Lübeck and the Free and Hanseatic Cities of Hamburg and Lübeck.

  6. Danes (Germanic tribe) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Danes_(Germanic_tribe)

    The Danes were a North Germanic tribe inhabiting southern Scandinavia, including the area now comprising Denmark proper, and the Scanian provinces of modern-day southern Sweden, during the Nordic Iron Age and the Viking Age. They founded what became the Kingdom of Denmark.

  7. Danish minority of Southern Schleswig - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Danish_minority_of

    The Danevirke between Hollingstedt and the Eckernförde bay was a Danish border wall towards Germany. Schleswig (Southern Jutland) was in the Viking Age still a direct part of the Kingdom of Denmark. First in the 13th century it became a fiefdom of Denmark. Old Danish were spoken north of a line between the Eider, Treene and Eckernförde Bay.

  8. Denmark's New Government Rolls Back an Anti ... - TIME.com

    world.time.com › 2011/10/06 › a-slap-to-europes-far

    Oct 06, 2011 · German Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle, who had criticized Denmark’s border plans, praised the about-face. “This is a decision in favour of liberty for European citizens,” he said in a statement. Denmark’s coalition will abolish the Immigration Ministry—a strong signal that the far-right’s grip on immigration really is over.

  9. Danes - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Danish_people

    Danes are a North Germanic ethnic group native to Denmark and a modern nation identified with the country of Denmark. This connection may be ancestral, legal, historical, or cultural. Danes generally regard themselves as a nationality and reserve the word "ethnic" for the description of recent immigrants, sometimes referred to as "new Danes". The contemporary Danish ethnic identity is based on the idea of "Danishness", which is founded on principles formed through historical cultural connections

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