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  1. A-level: Raphael, Portrait of Pope Julius II – Smarthistory

    smarthistory.org › raphael-portrait-of-pope-julius

    A-level: Raphael, Portrait of Pope Julius II by Beth Harris and Steven Zucker Raphael, Portrait of Pope Julius II , 1511, oil on poplar, 108.7 x 81 cm (National Gallery, London)

  2. Portrait of Pope Julius II by Raphael Sanzio: History ...

    arthive.com › 36049~Portrait_of_Pope_Julius_II

    Description of the artwork «Portrait of Pope Julius II» Pope Julius II remained in history as the largest patron of the High Renaissance. It is to him that we owe the appearance of such masterpieces as St. Peter's Basilica, ceiling of the sistine chapel Raphael's frescoes in Vatican stanzas (it. stanza - room).

  3. Portrait of Pope Julius II - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Portrait_of_Pope_Julius_II

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Portrait of Pope Julius II is an oil painting of 1511–12 by the Italian High Renaissance painter Raphael. The portrait of Pope Julius II was unusual for its time and would carry a long influence on papal portraiture.

    • 108 cm × 80.7 cm (43 in × 31.8 in)
    • Raphael
  4. Portrait of Pope Julius II by Raphael in the Borghese Gallery ...

    borghese.gallery › portrait-of-pope-julius-ii
    • History
    • Analysis
    • Patronage
    • Borghese Collection

    The portrait of Pope Julius II was bizarre for its time and would carry a long impact on papal portraiture. From early in its life, it was uncommonly hung at the pillars of the church of Santa Maria del Popolo, on the main route from the north into Rome, on feast and high holy days. Giorgio Vasari, composing long after Julius’ passing, said that “it was so lifelike and true it frightened everybody who saw it, as if it were the living man himself”. The portray exists in numerous adaptations and duplicates, and for many years, a version of the painting which presently hangs within the Uffizi Gallery in Florence was accepted to be the original or prime adaptation, but in 1970 opinion shifted. The initial is as of now accepted to be the version found in the National Exhibition, London. It was then purchased in 1608 by Cardinal Borghese, together with another sixty-nine artworks. The provenance of the copy is unknown: despite the fact that it was mentioned by Friedrich Ramdhor in 1787, i...

    This is one of eleven copies of this painting.Portrayed in three-quarters profile to the right, seated in an armchair, the pope is wearing a mozzetta over his cassock and he has a velvet cap. Previous Papal representations showed them frontally, or kneeling in profile. It was too “extraordinary” at this period to show the sitter so evidently in a specific mood – here lost in thought. The portray can be dated to between June 1511 and March 1512, when Julius let his beard grow as a sign of mourning for the loss in war of the city of Bologna.Raphael had also included fresco portraits of the bearded Julius, representing prior popes, within the Raphael Rooms of the Vatican Palace, in the Mass at Bolsena, with portraits of his daughter Felice della Rovere and Raphael himself within the same group, and in the portray representing Jurisprudence round a window in the Stanza della Segnatura, as well as in the Sistine Madonna.

    Julius II commissioned from Raphael this portray and Madonna of Loreto which resided at Santa Maria del Popolo, at the entrance gate to Rome.Upon the portrait’s completion, it was displayed within the church for eight days, where many people came to see it. The two artworks, about the same size, appear as if they were meant to complement each other. Aside from their dimensions, they also both had a strong vertical orientation. The eyes of the works of art were unhappy and gave a contemplative feeling. The positioning and lighting within the canvases appears to demonstrate that they were implied to each flank an altar in the domed chapel. In spite of the fact that the depictions were paired for a time, through change of ownership the “Madonna of Loreto” is presently located in the Musée Condé, Chantilly.

    The paintings were still recorded as part of the Borghese collection in 1693, as a small inventory number 118 at the bottom left of the London Julius shows. The revelation of this number, hidden by over-paint, in x-ray photographs in 1969 was one of the key pieces of prove establishing the primacy of the London version.It matches a catalogue of works of art in the Palazzo Borghese in Rome in 1693.

  5. Portrait of Pope Julius II - Infogalactic: the planetary ...

    infogalactic.com › info › Portrait_of_Pope_Julius_II
    • Composition
    • Provenance
    • Gallery
    • References

    The presentation of the subject was unusual for its time. Previous Papal portraits showed them frontally, or kneeling in profile. It was also "exceptional" at this period to show the sitter so evidently in a particular mood – here lost in thought. The intimacy of this image was unprecedented in Papal portraiture, but became the model, "what became virtually a formula", followed by most future painters, including Sebastiano del Piombo and Diego Velázquez. The painting "established a type for papal portraits that endured for about two centuries." According to Erica Langmuir, "it was the conflation of ceremonial significance and intimacy which was so startling, combined with Raphael's ability to define the inner structure of things along with their outer texture". The painting can be dated to between June 1511 and March 1512, when Julius let his beard grow as a sign of mourning for the loss in war of the city of Bologna. Raphael had also included fresco portraits of the bearded Julius,...

    The provenances of the various versions of this painting are constructed based on documents, analysis of the paintings and preliminary sketches. For over two centuries the prime version of the painting remained together with the Madonna of Loreto, first at Santa Maria del Popolo until 1591, then in private collections; then for a time in the early 19th century its location was unknown. Until 1970 it was commonly believed that the London version of the painting was a studio copy of a Raphael original, which was believed to be the version in the Uffizi Gallery, Florence. In 1969 Konrad Oberhuber of the National Gallery of Art in Washington asked the National Gallery to take x-ray photographs of their version. These revealed that the background of the painting behind the chair had been entirely repainted, concealing an inventory number from the Borghese collection and the green textile hanging now visible after the overpaint was removed in 1970. Small paint samples removed during this...

    Julius in The Mass at Bolsena
    Julius commissioned the Sistine Madonnain the last year of his life
    Lua error in Module:Citation/CS1/Identifiers at line 47: attempt to index field 'wikibase' (a nil value).
    Chilvers, Ian (2004). The Oxford Dictionary of Art. Oxford University Press US. ISBN 978-0-19-860476-1. Retrieved 29 June 2010.
    Lua error in Module:Citation/CS1/Identifiers at line 47: attempt to index field 'wikibase' (a nil value).
    Gould, Cecil (October 2004). "A Raphael Goose Turns into a Swan". Apollo. Retrieved June 29, 2010.
  6. STÄDEL PURCHASES PORTRAIT OF POPE JULIUS II BY RAPHAEL AND ...

    queue.typepad.com › renaissance_faires › 2011

    Dec 07, 2011 · The portrait of Pope Julius II is one of Raphael’s most famous works. It was in Rome between June 1511 and March 1512 that the artist executed his likeness of this highly art-minded – but also extremely strong-willed and irascible – pope. It shows the bearded pope in a three-quarter view, life-size, sitting in an armchair.

  7. 1 Raphael’s Julius II: Treatment, Purpose, and Iconography of Il Papa Terribile “A man is many men, to diverse men and times; and not even the greatest portraitist can show all these features in one moment’s face.”1 Raphael may not have been successful in showing all the features of Pope Julius II, but he did capture the essence of the man known as the warrior pope.

  8. Portrait of Pope Julius II (after Raphael) is one of artworks by Titian Vecelli. Artwork analysis, large resolution images, user comments, interesting facts and much more.

  9. What major objectives informed the patronage of Julius II?

    www.academia.edu › 9845795 › What_major_objectives

    The iconic portrait of Julius II painted by Raphael in 1511 (fig. 4) also provides us with interesting clues supporting the 'warrior Pope' 9, as he was also called, theory. 10 While in Melozzo's fresco of the Founding of the Vatican Library (fig. 1) the cardinal is depicted with a clean-shaven face, in Raphael's portrait, Julius II appears wearing a beard.

  10. Dec 14, 2011 · On December 6 2011, the Städel Museum in Frankfurt announced its possession of a workshop copy of Raphael's Portrait of Pope Julius II.A picture with a convoluted provenance and attribution history, it made the perfect candidate for a case study in the manner of my ongoing Raphael project.

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