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  1. 2nd millennium BC - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › 2nd_millennium_BC

    The 2nd millennium BC spanned the years 2000 through 1001 BC. In the Ancient Near East, it marks the transition from the Middle to the Late Bronze Age.The Ancient Near Eastern cultures are well within the historical era: The first half of the millennium is dominated by the Middle Kingdom of Egypt and Babylonia.

  2. Neo-Babylonian Empire - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Neo-Babylonian_Empire

    By the end of the second millennium BC, Marduk was sometimes just referred to as Bêl, meaning "lord". ... 626–539 BCE Late Period Twenty-sixth Dynasty of Egypt

  3. Egypt - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Egypt

    A second period of disunity heralded the arrival of the first foreign ruling dynasty in Egypt, that of the Semitic Hyksos. The Hyksos invaders took over much of Lower Egypt around 1650 BCE and founded a new capital at Avaris.

  4. Hebrew calendar - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Hebrew_calendar

    The Jewish calendar's epoch (reference date), 1 Tishrei AM 1, is equivalent to Monday, 7 October 3761 BCE in the proleptic Julian calendar, the equivalent tabular date (same daylight period) and is about one year before the traditional Jewish date of Creation on 25 Elul AM 1, based upon the Seder Olam Rabbah.

  5. Pakistan - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Pakistan

    The Vedic period (1500–500 BCE) was characterised by an Indo-Aryan culture; during this period the Vedas, the oldest scriptures associated with Hinduism, were composed, and this culture later became well established in the region. Multan was an important Hindu pilgrimage centre.

  6. Millennium - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Millennium

    A millennium (plural millennia or millenniums) is a period of one thousand years, sometimes called a kiloannum (ka), or kiloyear (ky).Sometimes, the word is used specifically for periods of a thousand years that begin at the starting point (initial reference point) of the calendar in consideration (typically the year "1") and at later years that are whole number multiples of a thousand years ...

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