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  1. 2nd millennium - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › 2nd_millennium

    2 days ago · The second millennium of the Anno Domini or Common Era was a millennium spanning the years 1001 to 2000 (11th to 20th centuries; in astronomy: JD 2 086 667.5 – 2 451 909.5).. It encompassed the High and Late Middle Ages of the Old World, the Islamic Golden Age and the period of Renaissance, followed by the Early Modern period, characterized by the Wars of Religion in Europe, the Age of ...

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  3. Anno Domini - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Anno_Domini

    4 days ago · The terms Anno Domini (AD) and before Christ (BC) are used to label or number years in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The term anno Domini is Medieval Latin and means "in the year of the Lord", [1] but is often presented using "our Lord" instead of "the Lord", [2] [3] taken from the full original phrase " anno Domini nostri Jesu Christi ...

  4. 1942 - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › 1942

    2 days ago · 1942 was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1942nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 942nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 42nd year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1940s decade.

  5. 1940 - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › 1940

    2 days ago · 1940 was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1940th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 940th year of the 2nd millennium, the 40th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1940s decade.

  6. Gregorian calendar - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Gregorian_calendar

    15 hours ago · The Gregorian calendar is the calendar used in most of the world. It was introduced in October 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII as a minor modification of the Julian calendar, reducing the average year from 365.25 days to 365.2425 days, and adjusting for the drift in the 'tropical' or 'solar' year that the inaccuracy had caused during the intervening centuries.