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  1. Standard-gauge railway - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard-gauge_railway

    A standard-gauge railway is a railway with a track gauge of 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1 ⁄ 2 in).The standard gauge is also called Stephenson gauge after George Stephenson, International gauge, UIC gauge, uniform gauge, normal gauge and European gauge in Europe.

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  3. Track gauge - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_gauge

    Regular freight and passenger services began on the standard gauge Mombasa–Nairobi railway in 2017 and on the standard gauge Addis Ababa–Djibouti railway in 2018. Lines for iron ore to Kribi in Cameroon are likely to be 1,435 mm ( 4 ft 8 1 ⁄ 2 in ) standard gauge with a likely connection to the same port from the 1,000 mm ( 3 ft 3 3 ⁄ 8 ...

  4. A history of track gauge | Trains Magazine

    trn.trains.com/railroads/abcs-of-railroading/...track-gauge

    The gauge of a railroad is the distance between the inside vertical surfaces of the head of the rail. Standard gauge is 4 feet, 8-1/2 inches. This is the gauge with which steam railroading began, and it became the common gauge of Britain, North America, and Western Europe except for Spain, Portugal, and Ireland.

  5. Standard gauge rail connection from Asia to Europe opens in ...

    trn.trains.com/Railroad-News/News-Wire/2013/10/Standard...

    Trains magazine offers railroad news, railroad industry insight, commentary on today's freight railroads, passenger service (Amtrak), locomotive technology, railroad preservation and history, railfan opportunities (tourist railroads, fan trips), and great railroad photography.

  6. The US standard railroad gauge is 4 feet, 8.5 inches. That’s ...

    wearesc.com/forum/index.php?threads/the-us...

    The US standard railroad gauge is 4 feet, 8.5 inches. That’s an exceedingly odd number. The US standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet, 8.5 inches. That’s an exceedingly odd number. Why was that gauge used? Because that’s the way they built them in England, and English expatriates built the US Railroads.

  7. Railroad Routes: Why are the rail gauges in Russia and China ...

    www.quora.com/Railroad-Routes-Why-are-the-rail...

    May 14, 2017 · Russia standardized on 5' (=1524 mm) early on; back in the 1850s, when the first major railways in the empire were built, that gauge was quite popular internationally (lots of railway in southern states of the US had it until some years after the ...

  8. Are all train tracks the same width throughout countries or ...

    www.quora.com/Are-all-train-tracks-the-same...

    Oct 18, 2017 · Its more about suiting the equipment to the gauge of the track and the envelope of the loading gauge regardless of the country - things are more complex than that!

  9. The US standard railroad gauge | Hi-Point Firearms Forum ...

    www.hipointfirearmsforums.com/threads/the-us...

    Jan 07, 2011 · The US standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet, 8.5 inches. That’s an exceedingly odd number. Why was that gauge used? Because that’s the way they built them in England, and English expatriates built the US Railroads. Why did the English build them like that?

  10. The Railroad Gauge | deltavan1

    deltavan1.wordpress.com/.../02/18/the-railroad-gauge

    Feb 18, 2017 · Therefore, the United States standard railroad gauge of 4 feet, 8.5 inches is derived from the original specifications for an Imperial Roman war chariot. In other words, bureaucracies live forever. So the next time you are handed a specification, procedure, or process, and wonder, ‘What horse’s ass came up with this?’, you may be exactly ...

  11. Railroad Track Gauges - TheArtofPressBrake

    www.theartofpressbrake.com/.../railroad-track-gauges

    Railroad Track Gauges … Fascinating Stuff . . . Railroad Tracks. The U.S. Standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet, 8.5 inches. That’s an exceedingly odd number. Why was that gauge used? Because that’s the way they built them in England, and English expatriates designed the U.S. Railroads.