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  1. Standard-gauge railway - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_gauge_railroad_tracks

    A standard-gauge railway is a railway with a track gauge of 1,435 mm. The standard gauge is also called Stephenson gauge after George Stephenson, International gauge, UIC gauge, uniform gauge, normal gauge and European gauge in the European Union and Russia. It is the most widely used railway track gauge across the world, with approximately 55% of the lines in the world using it. All high-speed rail lines use standard gauge except those in Russia, Finland, Portugal and Uzbekistan. The distance b

  2. N scale - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OOO_gauge

    N scale is a popular model railway scale. Depending upon the manufacturer, the scale ranges from 1∶148 to 1∶160. In all cases, the gauge is 9 mm or 0.354 in. The term N gauge refers to the track dimensions, but in the United Kingdom in particular British N gauge refers to a 1∶148 scale with 1∶160 track gauge modelling. The terms N scale and N gauge are often inaccurately used interchangeably, as scale is defined as ratio or proportion of the model, and gauge only as a distance ...

    • 1∶148 (United Kingdom), 1∶150 (Japan), 1∶160 (elsewhere)
  3. 5 ft and 1520 mm gauge railways - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five-foot_gauge_railway

    Finland allows its gauge to be 1,520–1,529 mm on first class lines (classes 1AA and 1A, speed 220 - 160 km/h). If the gauge of the rolling stock is kept within certain limits, through running between 1,520 mm ( 4 ft 11 27⁄32 in) railways and Finnish 1,524 mm ( 5 ft) railways is allowed.

  4. The US standard railroad gauge | Hi-Point Firearms Forum ...

    www.hipointfirearmsforums.com/threads/the-us...

    Apr 05, 2011 · The US standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet, 8.5 inches. That’s an exceedingly odd number. Why was that gauge used? Because that’s the way they built them in England, and English expatriates built the US Railroads. Why did the English build them like that?

  5. G scale - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1:22.5

    Incorrect scale/gauge but proportionally a similar size to other popular brands of the time. G scale is 1:22.5, used to model European trains that run on 1,000 mm (3 ft 3 3 ⁄ 8 in) metre gauge track. This scale-gauge combination is called "scale IIm" according to NEM 010. The G comes from the German word groß meaning "big".

    • 45 mm (1.75 in)
    • 1,000 mm (3 ft 3 ³⁄₈ in) metre gauge
  6. A history of track gauge | Trains Magazine

    trn.trains.com/.../2006/05/a-history-of-track-gauge

    Standard gauge is 4 feet, 8-1/2 inches. This is the gauge with which steam railroading began, and it became the common gauge of Britain, North America, and Western Europe except for Spain, Portugal, and Ireland.

  7. Rail Freight | Overview, Rates and Companies - Container xChange

    container-xchange.com/blog/rail-freight-overview

    The New Silk Road: from China to Europe. On the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), more than 6000 trains made the journey from China to Europe in 2018, which is an increase of 72% compared to 2017. Since President Xi Jinping announced the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) in 2013, China has sent more than 11,000 freight trains to Europe and back.

  8. A history lesson for people who think that history doesn't ...

    www.irv2.com/forums/f34/a-history-lesson-for...

    Oct 01, 2017 · A history lesson for people who think that history doesn't matter: What's the big deal about railroad tracks? The US standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet, 8.5 inches.

  9. Why Was Gauge Used? - Model Train Help Blog

    blog.model-train-help.com/2013/01/2550.html

    Jan 15, 2013 · The US standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet, 8.5 inches. That’s an exceedingly odd number. Why was that gauge used? Because that’s the way they built them in England, and English expatriates designed the US railroads. Why did the English build them like that?

  10. Trouble Understanding Curve Radius - Model Train Help ...

    blog.model-train-help.com/2017/01/trouble-understanding...

    Jan 18, 2017 · First, you can fit a nice sized railroad on a baseboard of 11ft. x 38in. You probably can’t fit concentric ovals in this space but there’s room for a lot of railroad. Since you specify OO gauge I assume you are a British modeler. Track radii in Europe are slightly different than in the U.S. Click on the link that JBH provided.

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