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  1. The US standard railroad gauge is 4 feet, 8 ... - Aviation Humor

    aviationhumor.net/the-us-standard-railroad-gauge...

    The US standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet, 8.5 inches. That’s an exceedingly odd number. Why was that gauge used? Because that’s the way they built them in England, and English expatriates built the US Railroads. Why did the English build them like that? Because the first rail lines were built […]

  2. Rail transport modelling scales - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/.../Rail_transport_modelling_scales

    in Europe: 1:87: 12.00 mm H0 scale using 12 mm (0.472 in) gauge track to represent 3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm) used as "standard" gauge in many African countries, New Zealand, Queensland, Japan, etc. European H0m (metre-gauge) models represent prototype gauges ranging between 850 and 1,250 mm (33.5 and 49.2 in).

  3. The US standard railroad gauge | Hi-Point Firearms Forum ...

    www.hipointfirearmsforums.com/threads/the-us...

    Jan 07, 2011 · The US standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet, 8.5 inches. That’s an exceedingly odd number. Why was that gauge used? Because that’s the way they built them in England, and English expatriates built the US Railroads. Why did the English build them like that?

  4. U.S. Standard Railroad Gauge - Southern California Live Steamers

    www.southerncalifornialivesteamers.com/Show_Tip.asp?ID=4

    The US Standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet, 8.5 inches. That's an exceedingly odd number. Why was that gauge used? Because that's the way they built them in England, and the US railroads were designed by English expatriates.

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  6. W&H MAIN YARDS: US Standard Railroad Gauge

    www.spikesys.com/Trains/st_gauge.html

    The US standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 ft 8 1/2 in (1.44 m). That's an exceedingly odd number. Why is that gauge used? Because that's the way they built them in England, and the US railroads were built by English ex patriots. Why did the English build 'em like that?

  7. Model Railroading 101 - Trainfest

    trainfest.com/model-railroading-101

    A railroad “gauge” refers to track size or width whereas “scale” measures the size relationship between a model train and its real-world train prototype. For example, a Lionel locomotive that is 1/48th the size of the real thing is called 1/48th or 1:48 scale.

  8. Hornby O Scale Model Railroads and Trains for sale | eBay

    www.ebay.com/b/Hornby-O-Scale-Model-Railroads...

    Large Gauge 1 trains became obsolete by the 1930s, and O gauge became the standard. O was largely replaced by OO and HO gauges by the 1960s, but O gauge has become popular once again, with companies like LLC, Lionel, Atlas Model Railroad Co, MTH Electric Trains, and Weavermodels producing O scale trains in exact 1:48 scale.

  9. Used Railroad Tie-Cresote Treated (Common: 7 in. x 9 in. x 8 ...

    www.homedepot.com/p/Used-Railroad-Tie-Cresote...

    The preservative that is used to preserve railroad ties has been banned entirely in the UK for sale to the general public. The response comparing coal tar to red wine is laughable. Water is toxic in large amounts, and you don't compare water to TAR.

    • (210)
    • $18.98
  10. Introduction to HO Scale Narrow Gauge - HOn3 Annual

    hon3annual.com/intro-ho-scale-narrow-gauge

    The gauge of N scale track (9mm) scales out to nearly 31″ in HO. Most American narrow gauge railroads were built to either two foot or three foot gauge, though 30” is a common narrow gauge standard throughout the rest of the world. Throughout Europe, HOn30 is known as “HOe.”

  11. WHAT HORSE'S ASS CAME UP WITH THIS? — Summerhill Stud

    www.summerhill.co.za/blog/2011/12/2/what-horses...

    Dec 02, 2011 · Therefore, the United States standard railroad gauge of 4 feet, 8.5 inches is derived from the original specifications for an Imperial Roman war chariot. In other words, bureaucracies live forever. Now, the twist to the story :