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    • NC Governor term limits

      Governor of North Carolina - Wikipedia
      • Governor of North Carolina. Governors are still limited to only two consecutive four-year terms, but they may run for further non-consecutive terms. Governor Hunt did just that, winning election to a third and fourth term in 1992 and 1996 after being out of the office for the eight years between 1984 and 1992.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Governor_of_North_Carolina#:~:text=Governor of North Carolina. Governors are still limited,for the eight years between 1984 and 1992.
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  2. North Carolina Two Term Limit for Governor and Lieutenant ...

    ballotpedia.org/North_Carolina_Two_Term_Limit...

    Nov 06, 2018 · The North Carolina Two Term Limit for Governor and Lieutenant Governor Amendment was not on the ballot in North Carolina as a legislatively referred constitutional amendment on November 6, 2018 . The measure would have changed the term limit for governors and lieutenant governors from two consecutive terms to two total terms in the same office.

  3. Governor of North Carolina - Ballotpedia

    ballotpedia.org/Governor_of_North_Carolina
    • Current Officer
    • Authority
    • Qualifications
    • Duties
    • Elections
    • Divisions
    • State Budget
    • Historical Officeholders
    • History
    • Noteworthy Events

    The 75th and current governor is Roy Cooper (D). Cooper defeated Pat McCrory (R) in the general election on November 8, 2016. He assumed office on January 1, 2017.

    The state Constitution addresses the office of the governor in Article III, the Executive Department. Under Article III, Section I:

    Candidates for the office of the governor must be: 1. at least 30 years old 2. a citizen of the United States for at least five years 3. a resident of North Carolinafor at least two years Additionally, no governor-elect may take office until he or she has taken an oath before the chief justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court.

    Excepting the governor's use of the State Seal of North Carolina and the gubernatorial power to make vacancy appointments, all constitutional duties are laid out in Article III, Section 5. The governor heads the Council of State. The governor is responsible for preparing and presenting the state budget to the General Assembly of North Carolina. Additionally, the governor of North Carolina has extensive powers of appointment of executive branch officials, some judges, and members of boards and commissions. The governor serves as commander-in-chief of the state military forces except in cases when they are deployed by the federal government. Other duties and privileges of the office include: 1. Residing at the official residence of the Governor 1. Making a periodic address to the state legislature concerning the state of North Carolina and giving recommendations to the legislature 1. Regularly monitoring the state budget to ensure that principal and interest on bonds and notes are pai...

    North Carolinaelects governors in the presidential elections, that is, in leap years. For North Carolina, 2020, 2024, 2028, and 2032 are all gubernatorial election years. Legally, the gubernatorial inauguration is always set for the first day in the January following an election.

    Note: Ballotpedia's state executive officials project researches state official websites for information that describes the divisions (if any exist) of a state executive office. That information for the Governor of North Carolina has not yet been added. After extensive research we were unable to identify any relevant information on state official websites. If you have any additional information about this office for inclusion on this section and/or page, please email us.

    Role in state budget

    1. 1.1. See also: North Carolina state budget and finances The state operates on a biennial budget cycle. The sequence of key events in the budget process is as follows: 1. Budget instruction guidelines are sent to state agencies in July. 2. State agency budget requests are submitted in October. 3. Agency hearings are held in October and December. 4. The governor submits his or her proposed budget to the North Carolina State Legislature in early February. 5. The legislature adopts a budget in...

    Governor's office budget

    The budget for the governor's office in Fiscal Year 2013 was $5,438,279.

    There have been 75 governors of North Carolina since 1776. Of the 75 officeholders, 39 were Democratic, 12 Democratic-Republican, eight Republican, five Federalists, five Whigs, four with no party and two Anti-Federalists.

    Partisan balance 1992-2013

    1. 1.1. See also: Ballotpedia:Who Runs the States and Ballotpedia:Who Runs the States, North Carolina From 1992 to 2013 in North Carolina, there were Democratic governors in office for 20 years, while there were Republican governors in office the two years, including the final year (2013). North Carolina is one of seven states that were run by a Democratic governor for more than 80 percent of the years between 1992 and 2013. North Carolina was under a Republican trifectafor the final year of...

    Conflicts between Gov. Roy Cooper and the General Assembly of North Carolina

    1. 1.1. See also: Conflicts between Gov. Roy Cooper and the General Assembly of North Carolina The 2016 election changed the political landscape of North Carolina. Before the election, Republicans held a state government trifecta, meaning they controlled the governor's office and both chambers of the legislature. As a result of the 2016 election, however, Democrats took control of the governor's office, while Republicans held a 35-15 majority in the Senate and a 74-46 majority in the House, g...

    • Partisan
    • $142,265
  4. NC governor extends Phase 3 COVID-19 rules, lowers gatherings ...

    www.newsobserver.com/news/coronavirus/article...

    Nov 10, 2020 · The governor also is reducing the limit on indoor gatherings from 25 people to 10. Outdoor gathering limits will remain at 50 people. ... Dawn Baumgartner Vaughan covers North Carolina state ...

  5. Governor of North Carolina - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Governor_of_North_Carolina

    Until an amendment was added to the state constitution in 1971, North Carolina governors could only serve a single four-year term and could not run for re-election. After the amendment was passed, in 1980 James B. Hunt became the first governor in state history to be elected to a second term.

  6. 2021 Governor's Chairs by State

    www.thegreenpapers.com/G21/Governor.phtml?v=i

    Governor Kay Ivey • Ascended to the chair 10 April 2017 following the resignation of Governor Robert J. Bentley (Republican). First elected: 2018. • Chair up for regular election: Tuesday 8 November 2022 • The current Governor is unaffected by the State's term limit.

  7. NC governor election 2020: Cooper vs. Forest | Raleigh News ...

    www.newsobserver.com/news/politics-government/...

    Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper has been reelected to a second term, the Associated Press reports, defeating Republican challenger Lt. Gov. Dan Forest. With more than 99% of precincts reporting, Cooper ...

  8. Length of Terms of Office of STATE Governors

    www.thegreenpapers.com/Hx/LengthOfTermGovernor.phtml
    • Background
    • Elections
    • Election results
    • Electoral history
    • History

    ALASKA was not admitted as a constituent State of the American Union until 1959 but, in anticipation of imminent Statehood, had elected its first State officers the previous year. ARIZONA was not admitted as a constituent State of the American Union until 1912 but, in anticipation of imminent Statehood, had elected its first State officers the previous year. CALIFORNIA was not admitted as a constituent State of the American Union until 1850 but, in anticipation of imminent Statehood, had elected its first State officers the previous year. In 1879, a Governor was elected to a transitional 3-year term in order to accommodate a change in the date of State elections from odd-numbered years to even-numbered years. In IOWA, an election for Governor was held in 1854 for a 4-year term which, however, ended up being a transitional term as a result of the ratification of a new State Constitution in 1857 which scheduled State elections for odd-numbered years. In 1903, a Governor was purposely elected to a transitional term in order to allow State elections to return to even-numbered years (per an Amendment to the State Constitution). KANSAS was not admitted as a constituent State of the American Union until 1861 but, in anticipation of imminent Statehood, had elected its first State officers two years earlier: the Governor elected that year served a transitional term until the ordinary sequence of State elections in even-numbered years could be established. LOUISIANA's legislature elected its Governor until 1846. Since popular election alone of the Governor was first instituted, the State has always authorized a term of office of 4 years for its Governor: however, the new State Constitution of 1845 purposely provided for a transitional term to which a Governor would be elected in 1846 and his successor elected for a full 4-year term in 1849; this 4-year term, in turn, ended up being a transitional term as a result of the ratification of a new State Constitution in 1852 which provided for a transitional term to which a Governor would be elected in 1852 and his successor elected for a full 4-year term in 1855. The State was under U.S. Military Government in the aftermath of the Civil War which- along with the ratifications of new State Constitutions in both 1864 and 1868- effectively interfered with its ordinary schedule of State elections. LOUISIANA ratified yet another new State Constitution in 1879 which provided for the election of a new Governor in the same election in which the new Constitution was being voted on (thereby effectively reducing the term of the Governor elected for a 4-year term in 1876); the Governor so elected in 1879 was purposely permitted to serve until his successor was elected for a 4-year term in 1884. In addition, beginning with this State Constitution of 1879 and up through 1960, LOUISIANA held its State elections in April of Presidential Election years (thus, separately from elections for Federal office in November of the same year); however: beginning in 1964, the State began moving its elections back into the Winter of Presidential Election years and then, eventually, into the Fall of the odd-numbered year immediately preceding a Presidential Election year: please note that LOUISIANA never allowed its Governors less than a 4-year a term of office during this period (1972 happens to be the last time the State elected its Governor in an even-numbered year [at the beginning of February in that particular year], while 1975 happens to be the first time the State elected its Governor in an odd-numbered year during this \\"transition\\" [in December of that particular year]; the State has been electing its Governors to a 4-year term in the Fall of odd-numbered years ever since.) MARYLAND's legislature elected its Governor until 1838. Since popular election of the Governor was first instituted, the State has always authorized a term of office of 4 years for its Governor: however, an election for Governor was held in 1861 for a 4-year term which, however, ended up being a transitional term as a result of the ratification of a new State Constitution in 1864 which scheduled State elections for even-numbered years; pursuant to this new Constitution, an election for Governor was held in 1864 for a 4-year term which, however, ended up being a transitional term as a result of the ratification of a new State Constitution in 1867 which returned State elections to odd-numbered years. In 1923, a Governor was purposely elected to a transitional term in order to allow State elections to return to even-numbered years (per an Amendment to the State Constitution). MICHIGAN was not admitted as a constituent State of the American Union until 1837 but, in anticipation of imminent Statehood, had elected its first State officers two years earlier. In 1851, a Governor was purposely elected to a transitional term in order to allow for State elections in even-numbered years (per a new State Constitution ratified in 1850). In 1883, MINNESOTA purposely elected a Governor to a transitional 3-year term in order to allow for State elections in even-numbered years (per an Amendment to the State Constitution). MISSISSIPPI adopted a new State Constitution in 1890 under which the Governor elected to a 4-year term in 1889 had his term of office purposely extended for two more years, so that his successor would be elected to a 4-year term in 1895: the State has elected its Governor in odd-numbered years immediately preceding a Presidential Election year ever since. MONTANA was admitted as a constituent State of the American Union in 1889: the Governor elected that year served a transitional term until the ordinary sequence of State elections in even-numbered years could be established. NEBRASKA was not admitted as a constituent State of the American Union until 1867 but, in anticipation of imminent Statehood, had elected its first State officers the previous year. NEVADA was admitted as a constituent State of the American Union in 1864: the Governor elected that year served a transitional term until the ordinary sequence of gubernatorial elections in even-numbered years not coinciding with Presidential Election years could be established. NEW HAMPSHIRE held two elections for Governor in 1878: the first was held in March of that year in order to elect a successor to the Governor who had been elected, as per the State Constitution then in force, to a 1-year term in State elections held the previous March; the second was the first election of a Governor to a 2-year term the immediately following November, per an Amendment to that Constitution which not only extended the term of office of the State's Governor but also moved the date of State elections to November of even-numbered years. NEW MEXICO was not admitted as a constituent State of the American Union until 1912 but, in anticipation of imminent Statehood, had elected its first State officers the previous year: the Governor elected that year [1911] served a purposely extended 4-year term (in the midst of which an Amendment to the State Constitution reduced the Governor's term of office to 2 years beginning in 1916). NEW YORK's State Constitution originally required that a vacancy in the office of Governor be filled by election to a full Term of Office. From 1777 through 1813, Governors were elected to a full Term of Office every 3 years but the Governor so elected in 1816 (Daniel Tompkins who had been declared elected Vice President of the United States by Congress in Tabulation Joint Session [1817], by the way) resigned, necessitating an election for Governor to a full 3-year term in 1817. Subsequently, an election for Governor was held in 1820 for a 3-year term which, however, ended up being a transitional term as a result of the ratification of a new State Constitution in 1821 which, thereafter, scheduled State elections for even-numbered years (concomitantly reducing the Governor's tem to 2 years beginning in 1822). NORTH DAKOTA was admitted as a constituent State of the American Union in 1889: the Governor elected that year served a transitional term until the ordinary sequence of State elections in even-numbered years could be established. OHIO's State Constitution originally required that a vacancy in the office of Governor be filled by election to a full Term of Office. In 1803 and 1805, Governors were elected to a full Term of Office every 2 years but the result of the election for Governor in 1807 was disputed: unable to otherwise resolve this dispute, the legislature declared the office vacant and authorized a new election of Governor to a full 2-year term (as constitutionally required in the case of a vacancy, as aforesaid) in 1808: elections for Governor to full 2-year terms followed from 1810 through 1848. An election for Governor was held in 1850 for a 2-year term which, however, ended up being a transitional term as a result of the ratification of a new State Constitution in 1851 which, thereafter, scheduled State elections for odd-numbered years. In 1905, the State purposely elected a Governor to a transitional 3-year term in order to allow for State elections in even-numbered years (per an Amendment to the State Constitution).

    CONNECTICUT held two elections for Governor in 1876: the first was held in April of that year in order to elect a successor to the Governor who had been elected, as per the State Constitution then in force, to a 1-year term in State elections held the previous April; the second was the first election of a Governor to a 2-year term the immediately following November, per an Amendment to that Constitution which not only extended the term of office of the State's Governor but also moved the date of State elections to November of even-numbered years.

    [NOTE: for more detail about these more recent changes in the dates of LOUISIANA's State elections, please see the table re: Dates of DIRECT PRIMARY Elections re: Major Party Nominations for Statewide and/or Federal Office which includes the dates of LOUISIANA's State general elections during the period in question.]

    SOUTH CAROLINA's legislature elected its Governor until 1865. The State's first popular election for Governor was held in 1865 for a 4-year term which, however, ended up being a transitional term as a result of the ratification of a new State Constitution in 1868 which scheduled State elections, thereafter, for even-numbered years.

    VERMONT was not admitted as a constituent State of the American Union until 1791 but- although claimed by NEW YORK prior to that date- operated under its own Constitution as something of an independent \\"Republic\\" until so achieving Statehood.

  9. NC Gov. Cooper: North Carolina Lowers Indoor Gathering Limit ...

    governor.nc.gov/news/north-carolina-lowers...

    Nov 10, 2020 · Nov 10, 2020. Governor Roy Cooper announced today that North Carolina’s indoor mass gathering limit will be lowered to 10 people in an effort to drive down North Carolina’s key COVID-19 metrics. Executive Order 176 will go into effect on Friday, November 13 and will be in place through Friday, December 4.

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