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  1. Spanish profanity - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Cabron

    4 days ago · The Spanish language employs a wide range of swear words that vary between Spanish speaking nations and in regions and subcultures of each nation. Idiomatic expressions, particularly profanity, are not always directly translatable into other languages, and so most of the English translations offered in this article are very rough and most likely do not reflect the full meaning of the ...

  2. Trique languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Trique_language

    4 days ago · The Triqui (/ ˈ t r iː k i /), or Trique, languages are a family of Oto-Manguean spoken by 30,000 Trique people of the Mexican states of Oaxaca and the state of Baja California in 2007 (due to recent population movements). They are also spoken by 5,000 immigrants to the United States.

  3. Judaeo-Spanish - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Ladino_language

    5 days ago · Judaeo-Spanish is the language spoken by Sephardi Jews expelled from Spain in 1492. It is a language derived from Spanish and spoken by 150,000 people in communities in Israel, Turkey, the former Yugoslavia, Greece, Morocco, Majorca, the Americas, among many other places.

  4. Basque language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Basque_language

    3 days ago · The Spanish Constitution of 1978 states in Article 3 that the Spanish language is the official language of the nation, but allows autonomous communities to provide a co-official language status for the other languages of Spain.

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  6. Cantabrian dialect - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Cantabrian_dialect

    Mar 01, 2021 · The preservation of the voiceless glottal fricative was usual in Middle Spanish, before the /h/ in words like /humo/, from Latin fumus, resulted in Modern Spanish /umo/. Every Cantabrian dialect keeps /f/ before consonants such as in /'fɾi.u/ (cold), just as Spanish and Astur-Leonese do.

    • 3,000 (2011)
    • Spain
  7. en - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org › wiki › en

    4 days ago · Abbreviation of English.··The name of the Latin-script letter N. The ems and ens at the beginnings and ends. (typography) A unit of measurement equal to half an em (half the ...

  8. Chinese language - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Chinese_language

    3 days ago · The Chinese language is the group of languages used by Chinese people in China and elsewhere. It forms part of a language family called the Sino-Tibetan family of languages. Chinese includes many regional language varieties, the main ones being Mandarin , Wu , Yue and Min .

  9. Equivocate definition and meaning | Collins English Dictionary

    www.collinsdictionary.com › english › equivocate

    3 days ago · Equivocate definition: When someone equivocates , they deliberately use vague language in order to deceive... | Meaning, pronunciation, translations and examples

  10. slang - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org › wiki › slang
    • English
    • Afrikaans
    • Cebuano
    • Czech
    • Danish
    • Dutch
    • French
    • Indonesian
    • Limburgish
    • Polish

    Pronunciation

    1. enPR: slăng, IPA(key): /slæŋ/ 2. (US, pre-/ŋ/ tensing) enPR: slăng, IPA(key): /sleɪŋ/ 3. Rhymes: -æŋ, -eɪŋ

    Etymology 1

    1756, meaning "special vocabulary of tramps or thieves", origin unknown. Possibly derived from a North Germanic source, related to Norwegian Nynorsk slengenamn (“nickname”), slengja kjeften (“to abuse verbally”, literally “to sling one's jaw”), related to Icelandic slengja (“to sling, throw, hurl”), Old Norse slyngva (“to sling”). Not believed to be connected with language or lingo.

    Etymology

    From Dutch slang (“snake, serpent”), from Middle Dutch slange (“snake, serpent”), from Old Dutch slango (“snake, serpent”), from Proto-Germanic *slangô (“snake, serpent”).

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): [slɑŋ]

    Noun

    slang (plural slange) 1. snake; serpent 1.1. 1983, E. P. Groenewald et al. (translators), Bybel, Genesis 3:2: 1.1.1. Die vrou het die slang geantwoord: “Ons mag eet van die vrugte van die bome in die tuin. 1.1.1.1. The woman answered the serpent: “We may eat of the fruit of the trees in the garden.

    Etymology

    Borrowed from English slang. A misnomer.

    Noun

    slang 1. (colloquial, informal) twang, foreign accent

    Adjective

    slang 1. (colloquial, informal) (usually of English speakers) Having a regional or foreign accent.

    Noun

    slang m 1. slang

    Etymology 1

    Borrowed from English slang.

    Etymology 2

    See slange.

    Etymology 1

    From Middle Dutch slange, from Old Dutch slango, from Proto-Germanic *slangô (“snake, serpent”).

    Etymology 2

    Borrowed from English slang.

    Anagrams

    1. glans, langs

    Etymology

    From English slang

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /slaŋɡ/

    Noun

    slang m (plural slangs) 1. English slang 1.1. Twain fut un des premiers auteurs provenant des terres intérieures des États-Unis qui a su capturer la distinction, le slangcomique et l'iconoclasme de sa nation.

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /s(ə)laŋ/

    Etymology 1

    From Dutch slang (“snake, hose”), from Middle Dutch slange, from Old Dutch slango, from Proto-Germanic *slangô (“snake, serpent”).

    Etymology 2

    From English slang.

    Etymology 1

    From Dutch slang.

    Etymology 2

    Borrowed from English slang.

    Etymology

    From English slang.

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /slank/

    Noun

    slang m inan 1. slang (jargon or cant)

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