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  1. Friulian language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Friulian_language

    15 hours ago · Friulian (/ f r i ˈ uː l i ə n / free-OO-lee-ən) or Friulan (natively furlan or marilenghe; Italian: friulano; German: Furlanisch; Slovene: furlanščina) is a Romance language belonging to the Rhaeto-Romance family, spoken in the Friuli region of northeastern Italy.

    • 420,000 (native) (2015), 600,000 (total)
    • Italy
  2. Harry Potter in translation - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Harry_Potter_in_translation

    15 hours ago · The Spanish translation has been adapted to three regions: Europe, Latin America and Southern Cone. Others translations have adaptations that were published seemingly to enhance the identity of minority communities of speakers: Montenegrin (an adaptation of Serbian ) and Valencian (an adaptation of Catalan ).

  3. Anglicism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Anglicism

    1 day ago · An anglicism is a word or construction borrowed from English by another language. With the rise in Anglophone media and global spread of British and US cultures in the 20th and 21st centuries, many English terms have entered popular usage in other tongues.

  4. At sign - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › At_sign

    1 day ago · The at sign, @, is normally read aloud as "at"; it is also commonly called the at symbol, commercial at or address sign.It is used as an accounting and invoice abbreviation meaning "at a rate of" (e.g. 7 widgets @ £2 per widget = £14), but it is now seen more widely in email addresses and social media platform handles.

    • .mw-parser-output .monospaced{font-family:monospace,monospace}U+0040 @ COMMERCIAL AT (HTML @ · @)
    • U+FF20 @ FULLWIDTH COMMERCIAL AT (HTML @), U+FE6B ﹫ SMALL COMMERCIAL AT (HTML ﹫)
  5. German language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › German_language

    1 day ago · The German language (Deutsch, pronounced ()) is a West Germanic language mainly spoken in Central Europe.It is the most widely spoken and official or co-official language in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, and the Italian province of South Tyrol.

  6. broken - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org › wiki › broken
    • Etymology
    • Pronunciation
    • Adjective

    From Middle English broken, from Old English brocen, ġebrocen, from Proto-Germanic *brukanaz, past participle of Proto-Germanic *brekaną (“to break”). Cognate with Dutch gebroken (“broken”), German Low German broken (“broken”), German gebrochen (“broken”).

    enPR: brōk'ən, IPA(key): /ˈbɹəʊkən/
    Rhymes: -əʊkən

    broken (comparative more broken, superlative most broken) 1. Fragmented, in separate pieces. 1.1. (of a bone or body part) Fractured; having the bone in pieces. 1.1.1. My arm is broken! 1.1.2. the ground was littered with brokenbones 1.1.3. One recent morning the team had to replace a brokenweather research station. 1.2. (of skin) Split or ruptured. 1.2.1. A dog bit my leg and now the skin is broken. 1.3. (of a line)Dashed, made up of short lines with small gaps between each one and the next. 1.4. (of sleep) Interrupted; not continuous. 1.4.1. 1906, Jack London, White Fang: 1.4.1.1. Then the circle would lie down again, and here and there a wolf would resume its brokennap. 1.5. (meteorology, of the sky) Five-eighths to seven-eighths obscured by clouds; incompletely covered by clouds. 1.5.1. Tomorrow: brokenskies. 1.6. (of a melody) having periods of silence scattered throughout; not regularly continuous. 1.6.1. 1906, Rudyard Kipling, Puck of Pook's Hill, London: Penguin Books, publi...

  7. cinema - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org › wiki › cinema
    • English
    • Catalan
    • Italian
    • Portuguese

    Etymology

    Borrowed from French cinéma, shortening of cinématographe (term coined by the Lumière brothers in the 1890s), from Ancient Greek κίνημα (kínēma, “movement”) + Ancient Greek -γράφειν (-gráphein, “write(record)”).

    Pronunciation

    1. (US) IPA(key): /ˈsɪn.ə.mə/ 2. (UK) IPA(key): /ˈsɪn.ɪ.mə/, /ˈsɪn.ɪ.mɑː/

    Noun

    cinema (countable and uncountable, plural cinemas) 1. (countable) A movie theatre, a movie house 1.1. The cinemais right across the street from the restaurant. 1.2. Synonyms: movie theatre (rare), movie theater (chiefly US), movie house (chiefly US), pictures (regional, dated) 2. (film, uncountable) Films collectively. 2.1. Despite the critics, he produced excellent cinema. 3. (film, uncountable) The film and movie industry.quotations ▼ 3.1. 2013 June 29, “Travels and travails”, in The Econom...

    Noun

    cinema m (plural cinemes) 1. cinema

    Etymology

    Borrowed from French cinéma, from Ancient Greek κίνημα (kínēma, “movement”).

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /ˈt͡ʃi.ne.ma/, [ˈt͡ʃiːn̺emä] 2. Hyphenation: cì‧ne‧ma

    Noun

    cinema m (invariable) 1. (art and industry) cinema 1.1. Il cinema è una lingua universale. —Pier Paolo Pasolini 1.1.1. Cinema is a universal language. 2. (movie theatre) cinema, movie theater, film theatre 2.1. Synonyms: cinematografo, sala cinematografica

    Etymology

    Borrowed from French cinéma or a reduction of cinematógrafo, ultimately from Ancient Greek κίνημα (kínēma, “movement”).

    Pronunciation

    1. (Portugal, Brazil) IPA(key): /siˈne.mɐ/ 2. Homophone: sinema

    Noun

    cinema m (plural cinemas) 1. cinema; movie theater (building where films are shown to an audience) 2. (uncountable) cinema (the art or industry of making films) 2.1. Synonym: cinematografia 3. cinema (films from a particular place or of a particular style as a group)

  8. date - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org › wiki › date
    • English
    • Aromanian
    • Danish
    • French
    • Interlingua
    • Italian
    • Latin
    • Novial
    • Old French
    • Portuguese

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /deɪt/ 2. Rhymes: -eɪt

    Etymology 1

    From Middle English date, from Old French date, datil, datille, from Latin dactylus, from Ancient Greek δάκτυλος (dáktulos, “finger”) (from the resemblance of the date to a human finger), probably a folk-etymological alteration of a word from a Semitic source such as Arabic دَقَل‎ (daqal, “variety of date palm”) or Hebrew דֶּקֶל‎ (deqel, “date palm”).

    Etymology 2

    From Middle English date, from Old French date, from Late Latin data, from Latin datus (“given”), past participle of dare (“to give”); from Proto-Indo-European *deh₃- (“to give”).

    Numeral

    date 1. Alternative form of dzatse

    Etymology

    From English date.

    Noun

    date c (singular definite daten, plural indefinite dates) 1. a date (meeting with a lover or potential lover)

    Verb

    date (imperative date, infinitive at date, present tense dater, past tense datede, perfect tense har datet) 1. to date(someone)

    Etymology

    From Old French date, a borrowing from Late Latin data, from the feminine of Latin datus.

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /dat/

    Noun

    date f (plural dates) 1. date (point in time)

    Participle

    date 1. past participle of dar

    Noun

    date f 1. plural of data

    Verb

    date 1. second-person plural present of dare 2. second-person plural imperative of dare

    Participle

    date 1. feminine plural of dato

    Verb

    date 1. second-person plural present active imperative of dō

    Participle

    date 1. vocative masculine singular of datus

    Noun

    date c (plural dates) 1. date (point in time)

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Late Latin data, from the feminine of Latin data.

    Noun

    date f (oblique plural dates, nominative singular date, nominative plural dates) 1. date (point in time) 2. date (fruit)

    Verb

    date 1. first-person singular present subjunctive of datar 2. third-person singular present subjunctive of datar 3. first-person singular imperative of datar 4. third-person singular imperative of datar

  9. right - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org › wiki › right
    • English
    • Middle English
    • Spanish

    Alternative forms

    1. reight (Yorkshire) 2. rite (informal)

    Pronunciation

    1. (Received Pronunciation) enPR: rīt, IPA(key): /ˈɹaɪt/ 2. (General American) enPR: rīt, IPA(key): /ˈɹaɪt/, [ˈɹaɪʔ(t̚)] 3. (adverb: exactly; immediately): 3.1. (dialectal, includes Western Canada, Northern England, Midlands) IPA(key): /ˈɹeɪt/, [ˈɹeɪʔt̚] 4. Rhymes: -aɪt 5. Homophones: rite, wright, Wright, write, rate (dialectal; certain senses only)

    Etymology 1

    From Middle English right, riȝt, reȝt, from Old English riht, ryht, reht (“right”), from Proto-Germanic *rehtaz (“right, direct”), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃reǵtós (“having moved in a straight line”), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃reǵ- (“to straighten, direct”). An Indo-European past participle, it became a Germanic adjective which has been used also as a noun since the common Germanic period. Cognate with West Frisian rjocht, Dutch recht, Dutch rek, German recht and Recht, Swedish rätt and r...

    Alternative forms

    1. reȝt, riȝte, riȝt, ryȝt, ryght, righte, riht

    Etymology

    From Old English riht; from Proto-Germanic *rehtaz.

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /rixt/, [riçt] 2. Rhymes: -ixt

    Noun

    right m (plural rights) 1. (baseball) right fielder

  10. druid - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org › wiki › druid
    • English
    • Irish
    • Old Irish
    • Polish
    • Scottish Gaelic

    Etymology

    Borrowed from French druide, from Old French, via Latin Druidae, from Gaulish *druwits, from Proto-Celtic *druwits (literally “oak-knower”), from Proto-Indo-European *dóru (“tree”) and *weyd- (“to see”). The earliest record of the term in Latin is by Julius Caesar in the first century B.C. in his De Bello Gallico. The native Celtic word for "druid" is first attested in Latin texts as druides (plural) and other texts also employ the form druidae (akin to the Greek form). Cognate with the later...

    Pronunciation

    1. (UK) IPA(key): /ˈdɹuː.ɪd/ 2. Rhymes: -uːɪd

    Noun

    druid (plural druids) 1. One of an order of priests among certain groups of Celtsbefore the adoption of Abrahamic religions.

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /d̪ˠɾˠɪdʲ/

    Etymology 1

    From Old Irish truit f (“starling”), from Proto-Celtic *trozdis, from Proto-Indo-European *trosdos (“thrush”); compare Latin turdus, German Drossel, and English thrush.

    Etymology 2

    From Old Irish druitid (“shuts, closes; moves close (to), presses (against); approaches; moves away from, abandons”), possibly related to Welsh drws (“door”).

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /ˈdru.iðʲ/

    Noun

    druïd 1. inflection of druí: 1.1. accusative/dative singular 1.2. nominative/vocative/accusative dual 1.3. nominative plural

    Etymology

    From Gaulish *druwits, from Proto-Celtic *druwits (literally “oak-knower”), from Proto-Indo-European *dóru (“tree”) and *weyd- (“to see”).

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /ˈdru.it/

    Noun

    druid m pers (feminine druidka) 1. druid

    Etymology 1

    From Old Irish truit f (“starling”), from Proto-Celtic *trozdi-, from Proto-Indo-European *trozdo- (“thrush”).

    Etymology 2

    From Old Irish druitid (“shuts, closes; moves close (to), presses (against); approaches; moves away from, abandons”), possibly related to Welsh drws (“door”).

    References

    1. “druid” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN. 2. Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “truit”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language 3. Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “druitid”, in eDIL: Electronic Dicti...

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