Yahoo Web Search

Search results

  1. ISO 639-3. hnn. Glottolog. hanu1241. This article contains Hanunoo text. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Hanunoo script. Hanunoo, or Hanunó'o ( IPA: [hanunuʔɔ] ), is a language spoken by Mangyans in the island of Mindoro, Philippines . It is written in the Hanunoo script .

    • 13,000 (2000)
    • Mimaropa
  2. Hanunó'o (ᜱᜨᜳᜨᜳᜢ) Hanunó'o is a Philippine language spoken in Mindoro in the Philippines, mainly in Mindoro Oriental Province and Mindoro Occidental Province. In the year 2010 there were about 25,100 Hanunó'o speakers. Hanunó'o is also known as Hanonoo, Hanunoo-Mangyan or Mangyan. Dialects include Gubatnon, Binli, Kagankan ...

  3. Jan 8, 2024 · The Hanunó’o language is an integral part of the cultural and linguistic heritage of the Mangyan people, a group indigenous to the Philippines. This unique language holds deep historical significance, as it represents the identity and traditions of the Mangyan community. The Hanunó’o language is primarily spoken in the Mangyan communities ...

  4. Hanunoo, or Hanunó'o ( IPA: [ hanunuʔɔ] ), is a language spoken by Mangyans in the island of Mindoro, Philippines.

  5. The Hanuno'o live inland from the southernmost tip of Mindoro. In the 1970s, the Hanuno'o numbered 6,000 out of a total of 20-30,000 Mangyan, already a minority on an island inhabited by 300,000 Tagalog and Visayan settlers. One 2000 estimate numbers the Hanuno'o 13,000. According to the 2000 census, 7,702 identified themselves as Hanuno'o in ...

  6. People also ask

  7. Hanunóo. The 7,000 Hanunóo (Bulalakao, Hampangan, Hanono-o, Mangyan) live in an area of 800 square kilometers at the southern end of Mindoro Island (12°30′ N, 121°10′ E), in the Philippines. They speak an Austronesian language, and most are literate, using an Indic-derived script that they write on bamboo.

  8. Hanun ó o. The 7,000 Hanun ó o (Bulalakao, Hampangan, Hanono-o, Mangyan) live in an area of 800 square kilometers at the southern end of Mindoro Island (12 ° 30 ′ N, 121 ° 10 ′ E), in the Philippines. They speak an Austronesian language, and most are literate, using an Indic-derived script that they write on bamboo.

  1. People also search for