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  1. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Arctic_(tug)Arctic (tug) - Wikipedia

    100002612 [1] Added to NRHP. June 22, 2018. The Arctic was a wooden hulled tugboat that worked on the Great Lakes of North America from 1881 to 1930. In 1930 the Arctic was stripped of her machinery, and abandoned at Manitowoc, Wisconsin. On June 22, 2018, the remains of the Arctic were listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    • Rand & Burger
    • 1.5 miles northeast of the Manitowoc Breakwater Light
    • 1881
    • Tugboat
  2. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › False_BayFalse Bay - Wikipedia

    Jun 25, 2022 · False Bay ( Afrikaans Valsbaai) is a body of water in the Atlantic Ocean between the mountainous Cape Peninsula and the Hottentots Holland Mountains in the extreme south-west of South Africa. The mouth of the bay faces south and is demarcated by Cape Point to the west and Cape Hangklip to the east. The north side of the bay is the low-lying ...

    • Background
    • Description and Construction
    • Final Crossing
    • Collision and Sinking
    • Passengers and Crew
    • Investigation
    • Wreck Site
    • Memorials
    • Commemorations
    • See Also

    Em­press of Ireland was the sec­ond of a set of twin ocean lin­ers or­dered by Cana­dian Pa­cific Steamships dur­ing their early years in op­er­a­tion on the North At­lantic. In 1903, Cana­dian Pa­cific of­fi­cially en­tered the mar­ket for trans-At­lantic pas­sen­ger travel be­tween Great Britain and Canada. In Feb­ru­ary of that year, they had pu...

    In early 1904 work com­menced at Fair­field Ship­build­ing and En­gi­neer­ing in Glas­gow, Scot­land. The lin­ers were de­signed by Fran­cis Elgar, and were spec­i­fied to be twin screw lin­ers with ser­vice speeds of up to 18 knots (33 km/h; 21 mph). Both were of iden­ti­cal ap­pear­ance, with two fun­nels and two masts, with equal pas­sen­ger ca­...

    Em­press of Ireland de­parted Que­bec City for Liv­er­pool at 16:30 local time (EST) on 28 May 1914, manned by a crew of 420 and car­ry­ing 1,057 pas­sen­gers, roughly two-thirds of her total ca­pac­ity. In First Class, the list of pas­sen­gers was rel­a­tively small, with only 87 booked pas­sages. This small num­ber did not how­ever spare the in­c...

    The ship reached Pointe-au-Père, Que­bec (or Fa­ther Point) near the town of Ri­mouski in the early hours of 29 May 1914, where the pilot dis­em­barked. Em­press of Ireland re­sumed a nor­mal out­ward bound course of about N76E, and soon sighted the mast­head lights of Storstad, a Nor­we­gian col­lier, on her star­board bow at a dis­tance of sev­er...

    Total numbers saved and lost

    The exact num­bers of pas­sen­gers and crew of the sunken ship who ei­ther died or were saved was not es­tab­lished until the in­quiry. This was be­cause of dis­crep­an­cies in the names of the pas­sen­gers shown on the man­i­fest (par­tic­u­larly in re­gard to the con­ti­nen­tals) and the names given by the survivors.As a con­se­quence, ini­tial re­ports in the news­pa­pers were incomplete.

    Rescue operations and survivors

    Storstad, which re­mained afloat, low­ered her own lifeboats and began the res­cue of the many sur­vivors in the water. The radio op­er­a­tor at Fa­ther Point who picked up the emer­gency sig­nal from Em­press of Ireland no­ti­fied two Cana­dian gov­ern­ment steam­ers, Eu­reka at Fa­ther Point Wharf and Lady Evelyn at Ri­mouski Wharf. Eu­reka was first on the scene and by 03:00 had re­turned to Fa­ther Point Wharf with 32 sur­vivors and sev­eral bodies. Eu­reka was told to go to Ri­mouski Wha...

    Litigation

    The Cana­dian Pa­cific Rail­way won a court case against A. F. Klave­ness & Co, the own­ers of Storstad, for $2,000,000, which is the val­u­a­tion of sil­ver bul­lion stored on Em­press of Ireland when she sank. The own­ers of Storstad en­tered an un­suc­cess­ful counter claim against the Cana­dian Pa­cific Rail­way for $50,000 dam­ages, con­tend­ing that Em­press of Ireland was at fault and al­leg­ing neg­li­gent nav­i­ga­tion on her part. Storstadwas seized at the re­quest of CPR, and sold...

    Aftermath

    On 5 June 1914, Cana­dian Pa­cific an­nounced it had char­tered the Allan Line's Vir­gin­ian to fill in the void in ser­vice in the Cana­dian Pa­cific fleet left by the loss of the Em­press of Ireland, join­ing the Em­press of Britain and other pre­vi­ously ac­quired CP ships on the St. Lawrence Run. The Vir­gin­ian em­barked from her first voy­age from Liv­er­pool under Cana­dian Pa­cific ser­vice on 12 June, which was to have been the next de­par­ture date from Liv­er­pool of the Em­press o...

    The Last Voyage of the Empress

    In 2005 a Cana­dian TV film, The Last Voy­age of the Empress, in­ves­ti­gated the sink­ing with his­tor­i­cal ref­er­ence, model re-en­act­ment, and un­der­wa­ter in­ves­ti­ga­tion. The pro­gram's opin­ion was that the cause of the in­ci­dent ap­peared to be the fog, ex­ac­er­bated by the ac­tions of Kendall. Both cap­tains were in their own way telling the truth, but with Kendall omit­ting the ex­pe­di­ency of ma­nip­u­lat­ing Em­press of Ireland in such a way as to keep his com­pany's ad­ve...

    Salvage operation

    Shortly after the dis­as­ter, a sal­vage op­er­a­tion began on Em­press of Ireland to re­cover the purser's safe and the mail. This was deemed a plau­si­ble ef­fort due to the wreck's rel­a­tively shal­low depth at 130 feet, shal­low enough so that in the af­ter­math of the sink­ing, the main­mast and fun­nels of the Em­press were still vis­i­ble just be­neath the sur­face. The salvers re­cov­ered bod­ies and valu­ables in­side the ship. They were faced with lim­ited vis­i­bil­ity and strong...

    Protecting the site

    In the province of Que­bec, ship­wrecks are not af­forded ex­plicit protection. How­ever, in 1999 the wreck was de­clared a site of his­tor­i­cal and ar­chae­o­log­i­cal im­por­tance and thus be­came pro­tected under the Cul­tural Prop­erty Act and was listed in the reg­is­ter of His­toric Sites of Canada.This was the first time that an un­der­wa­ter site had re­ceived this sta­tus in Que­bec. This pro­tec­tion was im­por­tant be­cause, un­like Ti­tanic, Em­press of Ireland rests at the rel­a...

    A num­ber of mon­u­ments were erected, par­tic­u­larly by the CPR, to mark the bur­ial places of those pas­sen­gers and crew whose bod­ies were re­cov­ered in the days that fol­lowed the tragic sink­ing. For ex­am­ple, there are two mon­u­ments at Ri­mouski. One mon­u­ment is lo­cated on the coastal road be­tween Ri­mouski and Pointe-au-Père and is...

    The hun­dredth an­niver­sary of the sink­ing of Em­press of Ireland was com­mem­o­rated in May 2014, by nu­mer­ous events, in­clud­ing an ex­hi­bi­tion at the Cana­dian Mu­seum of His­tory en­ti­tled Em­press of Ire­land: Canada's Titanic which moved to the Cana­dian Mu­seum of Im­mi­gra­tion at Pier 21in 2015. Canada Post is­sued two stamps to com...

  3. Jun 22, 2022 · USS Arkansas (BB-33) was a dreadnought battleship, the second member of the Wyoming class, built by the United States Navy. She was the third ship of the US Navy named in honor of the 25th state, and was built by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation. She was laid down in January 1910, launched in January 1911, and commissioned into the Navy in September 1912. Arkansas was armed with a main ...

  4. Jun 05, 2022 · .....attendi qualche secondo. #adessonews ultime notizie, foto, video e approfondimenti su: cronaca, politica, economia, regioni, mondo, sport, calcio, cultura e ...

  5. Jun 23, 2022 · “The Forest for the Trees” [“Der Wald vor lauter Bäumen”] (Germany, 2003) (B/B+): An idealistic young teacher moves to a new city to take up a mid-year replacement position teaching Grades 5 and 9. “I hope you don’t mind a little breath of fresh air,” she says when she’s introduced to the existing faculty.