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  1. May 27, 2024 · Reformation, the religious revolution that took place in the Western church in the 16th century. Its greatest leaders undoubtedly were Martin Luther and John Calvin. Having far-reaching political, economic, and social effects, the Reformation became the basis for the founding of Protestantism, one of the three major branches of Christianity.

    • Causes & Effects

      List of some of the major causes and effects of the...

    • Ninety-five Theses

      Ninety-five Theses, propositions for debate concerned with...

    • Indulgences

      The Roman Catholic Church conceded very few points to Luther...

    • Anticlericalism

      anticlericalism, in Roman Catholicism, opposition to the...

    • Martin Luther

      Martin Luther, a 16th-century monk and theologian, was one...

    • John Calvin

      John Calvin (born July 10, 1509, Noyon, Picardy, France—died...

    • Protestantism

      The existence of reform efforts in the 15th-century church...

    • John Wycliffe

      John Wycliffe (born c. 1330, Yorkshire, England—died...

    • Counter-Reformation

      Counter-Reformation, in the history of Christianity, the...

    • Why Did The Protestant Reformation Happen?
    • Early Protestant Reformers
    • Martin Luther: A Key Player in The Protestant Reformation
    • John Calvin and The Protestant Reformation
    • What Are The Five Solas of The Protestant Reformation?
    • Significance of The Protestant Reformation
    • Sources

    In the early 16thcentury, a scholar named Erasmus objected to several issues in the Roman Catholic Church, which at the time was the entire Church. He saw four major discrepancies between what the Church was teaching and what Scripture actually taught. 1. Church leaders enjoyed lives of wealth and ease. Erasmus wrote The Praise of Folly, which poke...

    While Erasmus was indeed a protester of many Church practices and teachings, others were likewise concerned and worked towards reform centuries before. In the 14thcentury, John Wycliffe and John Hus sparked reformation by preaching the gospel in the language of the people, not Latin. 1. John Wycliffe Wycliffe and his band of preachers, called Lolla...

    In Martin Luther’s time, Pope Leo X was head of the Church. The Pope’s taste for extravagance drained the treasury in only eight years. But St. Peter’s Basilica needed to be rebuilt, so the pope offered indulgences in exchange for funds to rebuild the cathedral. Indulgences were letters of pardon which guaranteed forgiveness of sins. Luther saw thi...

    Nearly two decades after Martin Luther drove the 95 Theses onto the door of a Catholic church in Germany, John Calvinwas summoned to become a leader of the Protestant movement in Geneva, Switzerland. According to Christian scholars, Calvin had gone to Geneva to avoid the persecution of Protestants in France, and upon his arrival, he was astounded t...

    The Protestant Reformation of the 16th century changed Christianity forever. One of the enduring legacies are The Five Solas, which are five Latin phrases that emerged during the Reformation to summarize the Reformers’ theological convictions about the essentials of Christianity, based on Scripture. 1. Sola Scriptura(Scripture alone) The Bible alon...

    1. The Protestant Reformation birthed Protestantism and the Protestant faith. The Protestant Reformation movement birthed the Protestant denomination, which at the writing of this article, includes nearly 1 billion people. The phrase “ecclesia reformata, semper reformanda” (the church reformed, always reforming) is an appropriate description of the...

    • Dating the Reformation. Historians usually date the start of the Protestant Reformation to the 1517 publication of Martin Luther’s “95 Theses.” Its ending can be placed anywhere from the 1555 Peace of Augsburg, which allowed for the coexistence of Catholicism and Lutheranism in Germany, to the 1648 Treaty of Westphalia, which ended the Thirty Years’ War.
    • The Reformation: Germany and Lutheranism. Martin Luther (1483-1546) was an Augustinian monk and university lecturer in Wittenberg when he composed his “95 Theses,” which protested the pope’s sale of reprieves from penance, or indulgences.
    • The Reformation: Switzerland and Calvinism. The Swiss Reformation began in 1519 with the sermons of Ulrich Zwingli, whose teachings largely paralleled Luther’s.
    • The Reformation: England and the 'Middle Way' In England, the Reformation began with Henry VIII’s quest for a male heir. When Pope Clement VII refused to annul Henry’s marriage to Catherine of Aragon so he could remarry, the English king declared in 1534 that he alone should be the final authority in matters relating to the English church.
  2. The Protestant Reformation was a religious reform movement that swept through Europe in the 1500s. It resulted in the creation of a branch of Christianity called Protestantism, a name used collectively to refer to the many religious groups that separated from the Roman Catholic Church due to differences in doctrine.

  3. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › ReformationReformation - Wikipedia

    The Reformation, also known as the Protestant Reformation and the European Reformation, [1] was a major theological movement in Western Christianity in 16th-century Europe that posed a religious and political challenge to the papacy and the authority of the Catholic Church. Towards the end of the Renaissance, the Reformation marked the ...

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  5. Martin Luther was a German monk and Professor of Theology at the University of Wittenberg. Luther sparked the Reformation in 1517 by posting, at least according to tradition, his "95 Theses" on the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany - these theses were a list of statements that expressed Luther's concerns about certain Church practices - largely the sale of indulgences, but they ...

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