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  2. Human Geography, AP Edition Chapter 15 . Appendix 1: AP Human Geography Topic V.A.2. Second Agricultural Revolution . Beginning primarily in the eighteenth and continuing into the nineteenth century, technological advancements rapidly changed agriculture in industrialized regions of the world, particularly Great Britain, Europe, and the United ...

    • Curricular Requirements
    • Required
    • Clarifying Terms
    • Samples
    • ̈ Evidence
    • Required Evidence
    • ̈ Evidence
    • Evidence
    • Clarifying Terms
    • ̈ The Evidence
    • Clarifying Terms
    • Evidence
    • Quantitative geographic data:
    • 3.D, 3.F
    • Evidence
    • Qualitative geographic information:
    • ̈ The syllabus Evidence
    • Clarifying Terms

    The curricular requirements are the core elements of the course. A syllabus must provide explicit evidence of each requirement based on the required evidence statement(s). The Unit Guides and the “Instructional Approaches” section of the AP Human Geography Course and Exam Description (CED) may be useful in providing evidence for satisfying these cu...

    These statements Evidence describe the type of evidence and level of detail required in the syllabus to demonstrate how the curricular requirement is met in the course. Note: Curricular requirements may have more than one required evidence statement. Each statement must be addressed to fulfill the requirement.

    These statements define terms in the syllabus development guide that may have multiple meanings.

    For each curricular of Evidence requirement, three separate samples of evidence are provided. These samples provide either verbatim evidence or clear descriptions of what acceptable evidence could look like in a syllabus.

    The syllabus must cite the title, author, and publication date of a college-level human geography textbook. AND ̈ The syllabus must demonstrate that teachers and students have access to maps and atlases and include at least one example of sources in each of the following categories: text-based qualitative sources quantitative sources visual source...

    ̈ The syllabus must include an outline of course content by unit title or topic using any organizational approach to demonstrate the inclusion of required course content. Note: If the syllabus demonstrates a diferent approach than the units outlined in the AP Human Geography Course and Exam Description (CED), the teacher must indicate where the con...

    The syllabus must briefly describe three student activities, one for each of the three big ideas. Each activity must be labeled with the related big idea.

    ̈ The syllabus must provide a brief description of one or more instructional approaches (e.g., activity or assignment) in which students analyze geographic theories, approaches, concepts, processes, or models in theoretical and/or applied contexts. ̈ The description must be labeled with the skill(s) and/or skill category.

    Processes: successions of events, such as spatial difusion, that lead to transformations of the cultural landscape.

    syllabus must provide a brief description of one or more instructional approaches (e.g., activity or assignment) in which students analyze geographic patterns, relationships, and/or outcomes in applied contexts. ̈ The description must be labeled with the skill(s) and/or skill category.

    Geographic patterns: spatial arrangements of phenomena on the surface of the Earth. Spatial relationships: the relationship or connections of geographic phenomena across the landscape.

    ̈ The syllabus must provide a brief description of one or more instructional approaches (e.g., activity or assignment) in which students analyze and interpret quantitative geographic data represented in maps, tables, charts, graphs, satellite images, and/or infographics. ̈ The syllabus must identify the source(s) used in the activity. The descript...

    numerical geographic data collected and displayed in sources such as charts, graphs, and maps.

    Using data and maps from the Population Reference Bureau’s website worldpopdata.org, students create a table to record data such as: infant mortality rate, total fertility rate, GNI per capita, percent urban, and married women using contraceptives from countries across diferent regions of the world. Individually or as a group, students complete a q...

    ̈ The syllabus must provide a brief description of one or more instructional approaches (e.g., activity or assignment) in which students analyze and interpret qualitative geographic information represented in maps, images (e.g., satellite, photographs, cartoons), and/or landscapes. ̈ The syllabus must describe the source(s) used in the activity. T...

    non-numerical geographic data represented in sources such as maps, satellite images, photographs, and cartoons.

    must provide a brief description of one or more instructional approaches (e.g., activity or assignment) in which students analyze geographic theories, approaches, concepts, processes, and/or models across geographic scales to explain spatial relationships. ̈ The description must be labeled with the skill(s) and/or skill category.

    Geographic scales: size of study area—may involve all the earth (global); a very limited area (local scale) such as a neighborhood or municipality; or something in between (regional or national scales).

  3. Definition: The deliberate effort to modify a portion of Earth's surface through the cultivation of crops and the raising of livestock for sustenance or economic gain. Definition: From the 1700s-1900s. Used technological advances from the industrial revolution to increase production and distribution of goods.

  4. Jan 8, 2023 · The Green Revolution was a period of significant development in agriculture that took place in the mid-20th century, primarily in developing countries. It was characterized by the introduction of high-yield varieties of crops, the use of irrigation and other technological innovations, and the application of chemical fertilizers and pesticides.

  5. industrial revolution. series of inventions that brought new uses to known energy sources and new machines to improve efficiency and enable other other inventions. location theory. predicting where businesses will or should be located. variable costs. energy costs, transportation, and labor costs. friction of distance.

  6. The Second Agricultural Revolution was a period of rapid agricultural development in Britain that took place between the 16th and early 19th centuries. It was characterized by a number of changes and innovations that transformed the way food was produced and consumed. One of the key factors driving the Agricultural Revolution was the enclosure ...

  7. India. Russia. Correct answer: England. Explanation: The Second Agricultural Revolution, also known as the British Agricultural Revolution, took place first in England in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. From there it spread to Europe, North America, and around the world. It involved the introduction of new crop rotation ...