Yahoo Web Search

  1. 1988 - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › 1988

    1988 was a crucial year in the early history of the Internet —it was the year of the first well-known computer virus, the 1988 Internet worm. The first permanent intercontinental Internet link was made between the United States (NSFNET) and Europe (Nordunet) as well as the first Internet-based chat protocol, Internet Relay Chat.

  2. Richard Jewell - Bombing at Centennial Olympic Park - HISTORY

    www.history.com › this-day-in-history › bombing-at
    • Incidents
    • Security
    • Crime
    • Trial

    In Atlanta, Georgia, the XXVI Summer Olympiad is disrupted by the explosion of a nail-laden pipe bomb in Centennial Olympic Park. The bombing, which occurred during a free concert, killed a mother who had brought her daughter to hear the rock music and injured more than 100 others, including a Turkish cameraman who suffered a fatal heart attack after the blast. Police were warned of the bombing in advance, but the bomb exploded before the anonymous caller said it would, leading authorities to suspect that the law enforcement officers who descended on the park were indirectly targeted. Within a few days, Richard Jewell, a security guard at the concert, was charged with the crime. However, evidence against him was dubious at best, and in October he was fully cleared of all responsibility in the bombing.

    On January 16, 1997, another bomb exploded outside an abortion clinic in suburban Atlanta, blowing a hole in the buildings wall. An hour later, while police and ambulance workers were still at the scene, a second blast went off near a large trash bin, injuring seven people. As at Centennial Park, a nail-laden bomb was used and authorities were targeted. Then, only five days later, also in Atlanta, a nail-laden bomb exploded near the patio area of a crowded gay and lesbian nightclub, injuring five people. A second bomb in a backpack was found outside after the first explosion, but police safely detonated it. Federal investigators linked the bombings, but no suspect was arrested.

    On January 29, 1998, an abortion clinic was bombed in Birmingham, Alabama, killing an off-duty police officer and critically wounding a nurse. An automobile reported at the crime scene was later found abandoned near the Georgia state line, and investigators traced it to Eric Robert Rudolph, a 31-year-old carpenter. Although Rudolph was not immediately found, authorities positively identified him as the culprit in the Birmingham and Atlanta bombings, and an extensive manhunt began.

    Despite being one of the FBIs most wanted fugitives, Rudolph eluded the authorities for five years by hiding in the mountains in western North Carolina before finally being captured on May 31, 2003. As part of a plea agreement that helped him avoid a death sentence, Rudolph pled guilty to all three bombings, as well as the 1998 murder of a police officer, and was sentenced on July 18, 2005 to four consecutive life terms.

  3. People also ask

    What was the date of the Olympic bombing?

    What was the Atlanta Olympic Games bombing of 1996?

    How old was perpetrator of Atlanta Olympics bombing?

    When was the bombing of Centennial Olympic Park?

  4. Eric Rudolph - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Eric_Rudolph

    Eric Robert Rudolph (born September 19, 1966), also known as the Olympic Park Bomber, is an American terrorist convicted for a series of bombings across the southern United States between 1996 and 1998, which killed two people and injured over 100 others, including the Centennial Olympic Park bombing at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta.

    • Bob Randolph, Robert Randolph, Bobby Rudolph
    • September 19, 1966 (age 54), Merritt Island, Florida, U.S.
    • Carpenter, roofer, handyman
    • American
  5. Centennial Olympic Park bombing - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › Centennial_Olympic_Park_bombing

    The Centennial Olympic Park bombing was a domestic terrorist pipe bombing attack on Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta, Georgia, on July 27, 1996, during the Summer Olympics. The blast directly killed one person and injured 111 others; another person later died of a heart attack. It was the first of four bombings committed by Eric Rudolph.

    • July 27, 1996, 1:20 am (UTC-4)
    • Atlanta, Georgia, United States
    • 2 (including 1 indirect fatality)
    • Pipe bomb
  6. Brief History of the Internet | Internet Society

    www.internetsociety.org › internet › history-internet

    After two years of conferences, tutorials, design meetings and workshops, a special event was organized that invited those vendors whose products ran TCP/IP well enough to come together in one room for three days to show off how well they all worked together and also ran over the Internet. In September of 1988 the first Interop trade show was ...

  7. Weird History presents Timeline and the year 1988. In 1988, we would see one of the largest oil spills ever with the Exxon Valdez, the undisputed heavyweight...

    • 27 min
    • 496.7K
    • Weird History
  8. Atlanta Olympic Games bombing of 1996 | bombing, Georgia ...

    www.britannica.com › event › Atlanta-Olympic-Games

    In 1998 Eric Rudolph, an ardent opponent of abortion, was identified as a suspect in the bombing of an abortion clinic in Birmingham, Alabama, earlier in the year, and later in 1998 he was charged with the Centennial Olympic Park bombing and the 1997 bombings of a gay nightclub and an abortion clinic in Atlanta.

  9. TIME Magazine Cover: Olympic Bombing - Aug. 5, 1996 ...

    content.time.com › time › covers

    Aug 05, 1996 · Aug. 5, 1996. Previous Week's Cover. Following Week's Cover. Buy this Cover. Read the Cover Story.

  10. Olympics on United States television - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Olympics_on_United_States

    The network boasted of being "America's Olympic Network" as it made the longest and most expensive commitment ever since the Olympics were first presented on TV. [ citation needed ] For the 1996 Summer Games, and all Games from 2000 to 2008, NBC paid a total of $3.5 billion, mostly to the International Olympic Committee but also to the USOC and ...

  11. People also search for