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    • Who discovered streptomycin?

      • Join Britannica's Publishing Partner Program and our community of experts to gain a global audience for your work! Streptomycin, antibiotic synthesized by the soil organism Streptomyces griseus. Streptomycin was discovered by American biochemists Selman Waksman, Albert Schatz, and Elizabeth Bugie in 1943.
  1. Scientific Discovery of streptomycin - 1946 The idea that tuberculosis and other infectious diseases could be cured with “chemicals” had first been proposed by a colleague of Dr. Robert Koch’s named Paul Ehrlich. Dr.

  2. The antibiotic streptomycin was discovered soon after penicillin was introduced into medicine. Selman Waksman, who was awarded the Nobel Prize for the discovery, has since generally been credited as streptomycin's sole discoverer. However, one of Waksman's graduate students, Albert Schatz, was legally recognized as streptomycin's co-discoverer ...

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  4. Oct 20, 2014 · October 20, 2014 Previous Next Streptomycin was one of the first aminoglycoside drugs to be discovered. In 1943, A. I. Schatz, a graduate student in the Rutgers University lab of antibiotic pioneer S. A. Waksman, isolated it from the soil actinobacterium Streptomyces griseus.

  5. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › StreptomycinStreptomycin - Wikipedia

    History . Streptomycin was first isolated on October 19, 1943, by Albert Schatz, a PhD student in the laboratory of Selman Abraham Waksman at Rutgers University in a research project funded by Merck and Co. Waksman and his laboratory staff discovered several antibiotics, including actinomycin, clavacin, streptothricin, streptomycin, grisein ...

    • 84% to 88% IM (est.) 0% by mouth
    • Kidney
  6. Streptomycin was discovered by American biochemists Selman Waksman, Albert Schatz, and Elizabeth Bugie in 1943. The drug acts by interfering with the ability of a microorganism to synthesize certain vital proteins. It was the first antimicrobial agent developed after penicillin and the first antibiotic effective in treating tuberculosis.