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  1. Also in that category is the Montreal Biodome. It was originally built as a venue for the track cycling and judo events of the 1976 Olympic Games. It was originally built as a venue for the track cycling and judo events of the 1976 Olympic Games.

    • The Olympic Stadium, A Jewel of Modern Architecture
    • A Grandiose Project
    • Chartering A Course Through Troubled Waters; The Building of Anathletic Centre
    • International Acclaim
    • A Piece of Quebec Heritage Still Under Construction
    • Promoting The Olympic Stadium and Its Heritage

    As an architectural project, the Olympic Stadium has beensubject to some of the most intense media coverage in the Province of Quebec’srecent history. For quite some time, its public image was tarnished by thevarious difficulties encountered as it was being built; the considerable timeit took to complete; as well as the substantial over-budget spending that theproject incurred. Nevertheless, the media hype, the complex’s distinctive shapeand it’s unique position in the eastern end of the metropolis all contributedto making the site an essential feature of the Montreal landscape. The OlympicStadium can be seen from about anywhere in the city and is often used as avisual landmark, even by pilots flying over Montreal. This predominant piece ofMontreal’s urban heritage stands out like no other building in the area. The Olympic Complex sits on a site located in the east end ofthe city on a 60-hectare [148.3-acre] lot parallel to rue Sherbrooke. It isclosely linked to Parc Maisonneuve and...

    In 1976, Montreal was asked to host the 21st editionof theSummerOlympic Games. Following the example of Munich’s 1972 edition of the Games,Montreal Mayor Jean Drapeau and his cabinet decided to assemble multipleathletic disciplines on one single site, thereby creating a cohesivearchitectural complex and reducing the necessity of having to move theparticipants from event to event. On the site that was chosen, there was already the CentrePierre-Charbonneau and the Maurice-Richard Arena. Both of are evidence of thecity administration’s previous efforts to renew this particular area of town byinstalling athletic facilities. The modern architecture of the two buildingsdesigned and built during the 1950s would make it possible to integrate themharmoniously into the new organic-style master plan devised by the City ofMontreal’s Public Works Department (which were to be reviewed and revised bythe architect Taillibert) (NOTE 5). A research delegation, lead by Charles A. Boileau, then directo...

    The construction of the Olympic facilities, which began on April 28, 1973, would come to have a negative impact on theentire project. The building project would take place at time when all themajor building sites in the Province of Quebec were undergoing politization. This political context would be joined by escalating syndicaterivalry between the two main labour unions, the Fédération des Travailleursdu Québec (FTQ) [Quebec Federation of Labour] and the Conférération des Syndicats Nationaux(CSN) [Confederation of National Trade Unions], which would then lead to twoconsecutive strikes that would last from November of 1974 into January of 1975,and then again later from May of 1975 to October of 1975. These strikes wouldresult in numerous project setbacks and delays, to the point that, by the endof 1975, it became difficult to determine whether the site would be ready intime for the Games. These setbacks brought about by clashes in labour relationswere joined by yet another factor: t...

    In spite of the financial and political unpleasantness on theconstruction site and the debt amassed while constructing of the maincomponents of the Olympic facilities (the Stadium, Velodrome, Swim Centre andthe Olympic Village)—a debt whose reimbursement would be drawn out over threedecades (NOTE 13)—positive effects fromhosting the 1976 Olympic Games would nevertheless be immediately felt inseveral sectors. A few examples of such effects would include, among others,the athletic facilities housed in the Olympic Stadium Complex that were madeavailable to the general population of the City of Montreal after the Games,the increased touristic affluence generated by Montreal’s newly acquired statusas an international city, as well as the founding of a large number of athleticassociations. Interestingly it is not only these associations that can tracetheir historic origins back to the 1976 Games, but also the practice oforganised amateur sports in the Province of Quebec. It wasn’t until 1...

    The Olympic Complex requires constant maintenance, but some ofthe facilities added on over the years have improved the site. And so, aglassed-in cable car on the outer surface of the tower, which whisks visitorsto the upper levels of the mast, was inaugurated on November 22, 1987. Its unrivalled height and unobstructed view of Montreal make theObservatory a major tourist destination. The excellent panoramic view of thecity from the tower observatory was awarded a 3-star rating from the MichelinGreen Guide in 1992 and the buildings of the Olympic Complex are listed as architecturalpoints of interest. In 1987, a further even more significant improvement to thecomplex was finally completed: the stadium roof. Just as planned in theoriginal blueprints, the roof was a movable Kevlar membrane covering aheretofore-unsurpassed surface area of 23,270 square metres. This solution for covering the Stadium roof proved however to beonly temporary, for the premature wear on the roof membrane cause...

    Over the years, the Olympic facilities have stirred up thebitter criticism of some of the most critical journalists and caricaturists.Nevertheless, 80% of all Quebecois are said to have a positive opinion of theComplex (NOTE 19). In spite of itslively controversial history, the Stadium remains a remarkable accomplishmentthat will eventually find its rightful place as a part of the Province ofQuebec’s architectural heritage for many generations to come. For no otherbuilding, neither in the province nor elsewhere in Canada can even begin tocompare with the singular uniqueness of the Montreal Olympic Stadium—and itseems that it is here to stay and it will be around for a long while yet. Not only did Taillibert succeed in innovating techniques whilebuilding the Montreal Olympic Park (the Stadium was the first time anintegrated approach for pre-stressing and post-tensioning concrete, as well asfor using structural textiles thathad ever been used (NOTE 20)), but the architect also was suc...

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    • The Logistics
    • The Ecosystems
    • More from Montreal

    What: Biodôme Where:4777 Pierre-de Coubertin Ave, Montreal, Quebec H1V 1B3, Canada Cost for Biodôme Only:Adult/5-17/0-4 $21.50/$10.75/Free Cost for Biodôme, Jardin Botanique, and the Planetarium: Adult/5-17/0-4 $52.50/$26.25/Free Covid Notes: Canada is currently closed to US tourists at the time of writing during Covid. Make sure you check the websiteto verify the museum is open and learn about special procedures for visiting.

    As you explore the Biodôme, you will encounter plants and animals from 5 different ecosystems: 1. Tropical Rainforest 2. Gulf of St. Lawrence 3. Laurentian Maple Forest 4. Labrador Coast 5. Sub-Antarctic Islands The lush forests are a lot of fun to wander through. The tropical rainforest ranges from very humid 72°F to 82°F. If you think the Northeast is quite hot and humid, at 70-80% humidity, this will be even more so. While the Biodôme is not a zoo, it is similar to Safari Parkin San Diego in that they focus on the entire ecosystem where plants and a wide variety of animals co-exist together. As long as the animals aren’t dangerous, they are allowed to freely roam inside the ecosystem and you might see some of the animals on the path. If you are interested in the forests of Canada, the Laurentian Maple Forestis the place for you. Here, you will see beavers, otters, lynxes, and other typical plants and animals of the Quebec forests. At one point one of our kids asked what kind of t...

    After the Biodôme, we decided to take a walk around Rue St Catherine, through Chinatown, and then to Old Montreal. While this vacation was quite a long time ago and things could have definitely changed, our impression was that the old town was best. Some other parts were a slightly rundown – not bad, but not hugely impressive either. Montreal can make a great road trip destination when traveling with kids!

    • Spy the best view over Montreal from Parc Mont-Royal. What better way to start a visit to the city than by gleaning a bird’s eye view from above? Nestled at the very heart of Parc Mont lies a viewing point of Mont-Royal.
    • Soak up some history at Chateau Ramezay. For those looking to enjoy a slice of history, the Chateau Ramezay provides just the ticket. Situated in the very heart of Old Montréal, the Château was constructed in the early 18th-century and has been a museum since 1949.
    • Visit Basilica Notre Dame. At the top of nearly every Montreal Bucket List, the Notre Dame Basilica is a must-see. Built-in the Gothic Revival style, one of the best highlights of the Basilica comes from when the ecclesiastical building was first constructed.
    • Go back in time at the Pointe à Calliere Museum. Established in the 1990s and located in Old Town Montreal, the Pointe-à- Callière Museum is a must-visit for any history buff, especially for those who want to gain a better understanding of the story of Montréal.
  3. Jul 09, 2018 · The Basilica was built in the 1800’s. The massive church has stunning, dynamic stained glass art pieces, and magnificent architecture. It is definitely a must see while in Montreal. Montreal Biodome. Located in Olympic Park the Montreal Biodome allows visitors to explore the four beautiful ecosystems in North America. Mount Roya l.

    • Development
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    • Cultural Life

    Montreal was a city of the interior, in contrast to Quebec City, which was the administrative capital and the main port where exchanges with France took place. Montreal soon became the great centre of the fur trade. Coureurs de bois, voyageurs and such famous explorers as René-Robert Cavelier de La Salle, Daniel Dulhut, Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville and Pierre Gaultier de La Vérendrye all set out from the city. These traders and explorers methodically explored the North American continent from the Gulf of Mexico to the Rockiesand established a network of trading posts to secure furs for the Montreal fur trade. The fur trade relied on the labour of Indigenous peoples and did not provide much employment in Montreal itself. Strong dependence on this single industry and the region’s weak agricultural output resulted in slow population growth early on. At the end of the 17th century, for example, the city had just over 1,000 inhabitants. Almost one century later, in 1789, the population ha...

    The city of Montreal encompasses the whole island of Montreal and some smaller surrounding islands. There are many riverside parks all around the island and along the Lachine Canal. Mont Royal dominates Montreal's landscape, and determined its settlement pattern for many years. After a trial period at Pointe-à-Callière, a point of land at the confluence of the St. Lawrence River and a smaller river, Montreal's founder, Paul de Chomedey de Maisonneuve, moved to an elevated site (25 m) farther from the river near Place d'Armes. This would become the site of Vieux ("Old ") Montreal, enclosed between 1718 and 1744 by a wall which was demolished in the early 19th century. Few visible traces of the early French settlement remain. Some exceptions include the Order of Saint-Sulpice Seminary built in 1685, and the residence of Governor of Montreal Claude de Ramezay, Château Ramezay, built in 1705. Most of the old buildings still in existence date from the 19th century, as the area's wealthy...

    Montreal has had three distinct decades of rapid growth since the mid-19th century: 1851–61, 1901–11 and 1951–61. Demographic growth has largely been the result of an influx of people from outside the city, as the periods of rapid growth coincided with the arrival of large numbers of immigrants. The most significant growth, however, was a result of internal migration, as a significant number of French Canadians and smaller numbers of English-speaking Canadians living in Quebec rural areas moved to the city. Natural growth was also a major contributing factor after the Second World War. Between 1966 and 1981 the number of city residents declined, then rose slightly to stabilize at just over 1 million. During that period most of the population increase occurred in the suburban cities. In 1996, 31 per cent of the metropolitan area population lived in Montreal proper, down from 80 per cent in 1931. The 2002 amalgamation of the island of Montreal altered that trend as the city population...

    After having an economy based on the fur trade for 150 years, Montreal evolved into a diversified commercial metropolis, focusing on both international trade and the distribution of manufactured goods. Industry played a growing role from the mid-19th century, and in the 20th century the services sector expanded with the rise of financial institutions, universities and engineering firms. In the late 1960s Montreal experienced much slower growth than in previous decades. Toronto’s rise as the unchallenged metropolis of Canada led to hundreds of corporate head offices relocating there. This process gained momentum during the 1960s and 1970s and was fuelled in part by many anglophones’ fears of the changing political and linguistic environment. This loss was only partly offset by the tremendous rise of major corporations owned or developed by francophone entrepreneurs (such as Bombardier or Quebecor) or by the provincial government (Hydro-Quebec and Caisse de Dépôt et Placement). At the...

    Montreal has long been a key seaport in eastern North America. The constant improvement of navigation above and below the city began with the construction of the Lachine Canal in 1825 and continued with the deepening of the channel between Montreal and Quebec City in 1851. Before the opening of the St. Lawrence Seawayin 1959 all goods destined for or coming from the Great Lakes had to be transshipped at Montreal. In 2011 its container traffic made up 28 per cent of the international container traffic in Canada, making it second only to Vancouver. Port facilities now extend over 26 kilometres on the island of Montreal and handle close to 30 million tonnes of cargo and 2,200 ships per year. Long a major Canadian grain-exporting centre, Montreal's harbour has become one of the leading container-handling ports on the Eastern seaboard of North America. In 1978, the outdated facilities in its core area were transferred to the Old Port Corporation, an organization created to develop touris...

    Historically Montreal has been a leading communications centre in Canada and also plays a distinct role as the home of most French-language media in the country. The city houses the corporate headquarters, the head stations, and the main studios of four francophone television networks: the federally owned Radio-Canada (the French-language equivalent of the CBC), the provincially owned educational Télé-Quebec, and the privately owned TVA and V, formerly Quatre-saisons. The francophone radio networks are located in Montreal, including community radio station CIBL, Université de Montreal’s student radio station CISM, and CHOQ.FM, Université du Quebec a Montreal’s student radio station. This concentration stimulates the whole cultural scene, allowing Montreal to be one of the leading media centres for international French speakers. The anglophone population is also well served with two local television stations, CBC and CTV, and many local radio stations. Montreal has three French-langu...

    Starting in 1796 Montreal’s municipal affairs were administered by magistrates not accountable to citizens for their actions. In 1832 Montreal got its first charter, which had a life-span of four years and allowed property owners to elect a city council. However, the city charter was not renewed in1836 because the provincial legislature was out of session due to political unrest in Lower Canada (Quebec). Because the charter was not renewed the magistrates resumed their administrative role until the city was granted a new charter in 1840. In 1851 the people were empowered to elect the mayor, although only property owners and certain tenants had this privilege. In its first decades the city council resembled a private club for important Montreal businessmen. In the late 19th century poor administration and corruption at city hall led some businessmen to form reformist groups. After a public inquiry, the provincial government created an elected four-member Board of Control, which limit...

    A strong francophone population gives Montreal a distinctive character among large North American cities. It is the main centre of expression and diffusion of French Canadian culture, as well as the meeting place between the French and American cultures. The anglophone minority also has its particular cultural institutions in the city. Montreal is an important university centre, with two French-speaking universities: Université de Montreal and Université du Quebec à Montreal, and two English-speaking universities: McGill and Concordia. Located in Montreal, the Quebec National Library has copies of all works published in the province. A new library building opened to the public in 2005 and is the home of the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Quebec (BAnQ), and serves as the central library for the island of Montreal. The Musée des Beaux-Arts, established in 1860, contains a general collection, while the Musée d’Art Contemporain collects the works of contemporary artists. Other m...

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