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  1. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › KarlsruheKarlsruhe - Wikipedia

    Karlsruhe (/ ˈ k ɑːr l z r uː ə /, US also / ˈ k ɑːr l s-/, German: [ˈkaʁlsˌʁuːə] (); South Franconian: Kallsruh; formerly spelled Carlsruhe) is the second-largest city of the German federal state of Baden-Württemberg after its capital of Stuttgart, and its 313,092 inhabitants make it the 21st largest city of Germany.

    • 115 m (377 ft)
    • Germany
  2. Karlsruhe airfield in the mid 1930s on a US military map from 1952 - Compared to the map of 1928, it is evident that the field has been expanded to the north Source: AMS M841 GSGS 4414, Courtesy Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University

    • N490140 E0082247 (WGS84) Google Maps
    • Baden-Württemberg
    • 375 ft
    • EDIL (1990)
  3. People also ask

    Are there US Army installations in Germersheim and Karlsruhe?

    Which is the smallest Kaserne in Karlsruhe Germany?

    Where are the military post facilities in Karlsruhe?

    Where are the military bases in Germany located?

  4. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › HagsfeldKarlsruhe - Wikipedia

    • Geography
    • History
    • Population
    • Main Sights
    • Government
    • Economy
    • Transport
    • Jewish Community
    • Famous People
    • Notable Contemporary Entertainment and Sports Figures

    Karlsruhe lies completely to the east of the Rhine, and almost completely on the Upper Rhine Plain. It contains the Turmberg in the east, and also lies on the borders of the Kraichgau leading to the Northern Black Forest. The Rhine, one of the world's most important shipping routes, forms the western limits of the city, beyond which lie the towns of Maximiliansau and Wörth am Rhein in the German state of Rhineland-Palatinate. The city centre is about 7.5 km (4.7 mi) from the river, as measured from the Marktplatz (Market Square). Two tributaries of the Rhine, the Alb and the Pfinz, flow through the city from the Kraichgau to eventually join the Rhine. The city lies at an altitude between 100 and 322 m (near the communications tower in the suburb of Grünwettersbach). Its geographical coordinates are WikiMiniAtlas49°00′N 8°24′E / 49.000°N 8.400°E / 49.000; 8.400; the 49th parallel runs through the city centre, which puts it at the same latitude as much of the Canada–United States b...

    According to legend, the name Karlsruhe, which translates as "Charles’ repose" or "Charles' peace", was given to the new city after a hunting trip when Margrave Charles III William of Baden-Durlachwoke from a dream in which he dreamt of founding his new city. A variation of this story claims that he built the new palace to find peace from his wife. Charles William founded the city on June 17, 1715, after a dispute with the citizens of his previous capital, Durlach. The founding of the city is closely linked to the construction of the palace. Karlsruhe became the capital of Baden-Durlach, and, in 1771, of the united Baden until 1945. Built in 1822, the Ständehauswas the first parliament building in a German state. In the aftermath of the democratic revolution of 1848, a republican government was elected there. Karlsruhe was visited by Thomas Jefferson during his time as the American envoy to France; when Pierre Charles L'Enfant was planning the layout of Washington, D.C., Jefferson p...

    The following list shows the most significant groups of foreigners residing in the city of Karlsruhe by country.

    The Stadtgarten is a recreational area near the main railway station (Hauptbahnhof) and was rebuilt for the 1967 Federal Garden Show (Bundesgartenschau). It is also the site of the Karlsruhe Zoo. The Durlacher Turmberg has a look-out tower (hence its name). It is a former keepdating back to the 13th century. The city has two botanical gardens: the municipal Botanischer Garten Karlsruhe, which forms part of the Palace complex, and the Botanischer Garten der Universität Karlsruhe, which is maintained by the university. The Marktplatz has a stone pyramid marking the grave of the city's founder. Built in 1825, it is the emblem of Karlsruhe.The city is nicknamed the "fan city" (die Fächerstadt) because of its design layout, with straight streets radiating fan-like from the Palace. The Karlsruhe Palace (Schloss) is an interesting piece of architecture; the adjacent Schlossgartenincludes the Botanical Garden with a palm, cactus and orchid house, and walking paths through the woods to the n...

    Justice

    Karlsruhe is the seat of the German Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht) and the highest Court of Appeals in civil and criminal cases, the Bundesgerichtshof. The courts came to Karlsruhe after World War II, when the provinces of Baden and Württemberg were merged. Stuttgart, capital of Württemberg, became the capital of the new province (Württemberg-Baden in 1945 and Baden-Württembergin 1952). In compensation for the state authorities relocated to Stuttgart, Karlsruhe applie...

    Public health

    There are four hospitals: The municipal Klinikum Karlsruhe provides the maximum level of medical services, the St. Vincentius-Kliniken and the Diakonissenkrankenhaus, connected to the Catholic and Protestant churches, respectively, offer central services, and the private Paracelsus-Klinik basic medical care, according to state hospital demand planning.[citation needed]

    Germany's largest oil refinery is located in Karlsruhe, at the western edge of the city, directly on the river Rhine. The Technologieregion Karlsruhe is a loose confederation of the region's cities in order to promote high tech industries; today, about 20% of the region's jobs are in research and development. EnBW, one of Germany's biggest electric utility companies and a revenue of 19.2 billion € in 2012,is headquartered in the city.

    The Verkehrsbetriebe Karlsruhe (VBK) operates the city's urban public transport network, comprising seven tram routes and a network of bus routes. All city areas can be reached round the clock by tram and a night bus system. The Turmbergbahn funicular railway, to the east of the city centre, is also operated by the VBK. The VBK is also a partner, with the Albtal-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft and Deutsche Bahn, in the operation of the Karlsruhe Stadtbahn, the rail system that serves a larger area around the city. This system makes it possible to reach other towns in the region, like Ettlingen, Wörth am Rhein, Pforzheim, Bad Wildbad, Bretten, Bruchsal, Heilbronn, Baden-Baden, and even Freudenstadt in the Black Forest right from the city centre. The Stadtbahn is known for pioneering the concept of operating trams on train tracks, to achieve a more effective and attractive public transportsystem. Karlsruhe is connected via road and rail, with Autobahn and Intercity Express connections going to...

    Jews settled in Karlsruhe soon after its founding. They were attracted by the numerous privileges granted by its founder to settlers, without discrimination as to creed. Official documents attest the presence of several Jewish families at Karlsruhe in 1717. A year later the city council addressed to the margrave a report in which a question was raised as to the proportion of municipal charges to be borne by the newly arrived Jews, who in that year formed an organized congregation, with Rabbi Nathan Uri Kohen of Metzat its head. A document dated 1726 gives the names of twenty-four Jews who had taken part in an election of municipal officers. As the city grew, permission to settle there became less easily obtained by Jews, and the community developed more slowly. A 1752 Jewry ordinance stated Jews were forbidden to leave the city on Sundays and Christian holidays, or to go out of their houses during church services, but they were exempted from service by court summonses on Sabbaths. T...

    Karl Benz (1844–1929), mechanical engineer and inventor of the first automobile as well as the founder of Benz & Co., Daimler-Benz, and Mercedes-Benz (now part of Daimler AG). He was born in the Ka...
    Siegfried Buback, (1920–1977), then-Attorney General of Germany who fell victim to terrorists of the Rote Armee Fraktionin April 1977 in Karlsruhe
    Christa Bauch, female bodybuilder
    Walther Bensemann, one of the founders of the first southern German soccer club Karlsruher FV and later one of the founders of DFB and the founder of Kicker, Germany's leading soccer magazine
    Oliver Bierhoff, (born 1968), retired football striker and former national team captain for the Germany and Italian Serie A clubs Udinese, A.C. Milan and Chievo; currently working as the German nat...
  5. The smallest kaserne in Karlsruhe, Smiley Barracks, is the seat of the Post Headquarters. The barracks owes its name to T/4 Lester W. Smiley, who was posthumously awarded the Silver Star in WWII. The kaserne was originally built in 1937 and was named Forster Kaserne for General Forster of the German Luftwaffe.

    • Geography
    • History
    • Demographics
    • Main Sights
    • Government
    • Economy
    • Transport
    • Jewish Community
    • Famous People
    • Notable Contemporary Entertainment and Sports Figures

    Karl­sruhe lies com­pletely to the east of the Rhine, and al­most com­pletely on the Upper Rhine Plain. It con­tains the Turm­berg in the east, and also lies on the bor­ders of the Kraich­gau lead­ing to the North­ern Black For­est. The Rhine, one of the world's most im­por­tant ship­ping routes, forms the west­ern lim­its of the city, be­yond which lie the towns of Max­i­m­il­iansau and Wörth am Rhein in the Ger­man state of Rhineland-Palati­nate. The city cen­tre is about 7.5 km (4.7 mi) from the river, as mea­sured from the Mark­t­platz (Mar­ket Square). Two trib­u­taries of the Rhine, the Alb and the Pfinz, flow through the city from the Kraich­gau to even­tu­ally join the Rhine. The city lies at an al­ti­tude be­tween 100 and 322 m (near the com­mu­ni­ca­tions tower in the sub­urb of Grünwet­ters­bach). Its ge­o­graph­i­cal co­or­di­nates are 49°00′N 8°24′E / 49.000°N 8.400°E / 49.000; 8.400; the 49th par­al­lel runs through the city cen­tre, which puts it at the same lat­i­...

    Ac­cord­ing to leg­end, the name Karl­sruhe, which trans­lates as "Charles’ re­pose" or "Charles' peace", was given to the new city after a hunt­ing trip when Mar­grave Charles III William of Baden-Durlach, woke from a dream in which he dreamt of found­ing his new city. A vari­a­tion of this story claims that he built the new palace to find peace from his wife. Charles William founded the city on June 17, 1715, after a dis­pute with the cit­i­zens of his pre­vi­ous cap­i­tal, Durlach. The found­ing of the city is closely linked to the con­struc­tion of the palace. Karl­sruhe be­came the cap­i­tal of Baden-Durlach, and in 1771, of the united Baden until 1945. Built in 1822, the Stände­hauswas the first par­lia­ment build­ing in a Ger­man state. In the af­ter­math of the de­mo­c­ra­tic rev­o­lu­tion of 1848, a re­pub­li­can gov­ern­ment was elected here. Karl­sruhe was vis­ited by Thomas Jef­fer­son dur­ing his time as the Amer­i­can envoy to France; when Pierre Charles L'En­fant was...

    The fol­low­ing list shows the most sig­nif­i­cant groups of for­eign­ers re­sid­ing in the city of Karl­sruhe by coun­try.

    The Stadt­garten is a recre­ational area near the main rail­way sta­tion (Haupt­bahn­hof) and was re­built for the 1967 Fed­eral Gar­den Show (Bun­des­garten­schau). It is also the site of the Karl­sruhe Zoo. The Durlacher Turm­berg has a look-out tower (hence its name). It is a for­mer keepdat­ing back to the 13th cen­tury. The city has two botan­i­cal gar­dens: the mu­nic­i­pal Botanis­cher Garten Karl­sruhe, which forms part of the Palace com­plex, and the Botanis­cher Garten der Uni­ver­sität Karl­sruhe, which is main­tained by the uni­ver­sity. The Mark­t­platz has a stone pyra­mid mark­ing the grave of the city's founder. Built in 1825, it is the em­blem of Karl­sruhe.The city is nick­named the "fan city" (die Fächerstadt) be­cause of its de­sign lay­out, with straight streets ra­di­at­ing fan-like from the Palace. The Karl­sruhe Palace (Schloss) is an in­ter­est­ing piece of ar­chi­tec­ture; the ad­ja­cent Schloss­gartenin­cludes the Botan­i­cal Gar­den with a palm, cac­tus a...

    Justice

    Karl­sruhe is the seat of the Ger­man Fed­eral Con­sti­tu­tional Court (Bun­desver­fas­sungs­gericht) and the high­est Court of Ap­peals in civil and crim­i­nal cases, the Bun­des­gericht­shof. The courts came to Karl­sruhe after World War II, when the provinces of Baden and Würt­tem­berg were merged. Stuttgart, cap­i­tal of Würt­tem­berg, be­came the cap­i­tal of the new province (Würt­tem­berg-Baden in 1945 and Baden-Würt­tem­bergin 1952). In com­pen­sa­tion for the state au­thor­i­ties re­...

    Public health

    There are four hos­pi­tals: The mu­nic­i­pal Klinikum Karlsruhe pro­vides the max­i­mum level of med­ical ser­vices, the St. Vincentius-Kliniken and the Di­akonis­senkranken­haus, con­nected to the Catholic and Protes­tant churches, re­spec­tively, offer cen­tral ser­vices, and the pri­vate Paracel­sus-Klinik basic med­ical care, ac­cord­ing to state hos­pi­tal de­mand planning.[citation needed]

    Ger­many's largest oil re­fin­ery is lo­cated in Karl­sruhe, at the west­ern edge of the city, di­rectly on the river Rhine. The Tech­nolo­giere­gion Karlsruhe is a loose con­fed­er­a­tion of the re­gion's cities in order to pro­mote high tech in­dus­tries; today, about 20% of the re­gion's jobs are in re­search and de­vel­op­ment. EnBW, one of Ger­many's biggest elec­tric util­ity com­pa­nies and a rev­enue of 19.2 bil­lion € in 2012,is head­quar­tered in the city.

    The Verkehrs­be­triebe Karl­sruhe (VBK) op­er­ates the city's urban pub­lic trans­port net­work, com­pris­ing seven tram routes and a net­work of bus routes. This net­work is well de­vel­oped and all city areas can be reached round the clock by tram and a night bus sys­tem. The Turm­berg­bahn fu­nic­u­lar rail­way, to the east of the city cen­tre, is also op­er­ated by the VBK. The VBK is also a part­ner, with the Alb­tal-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft and Deutsche Bahn, in the op­er­a­tion of the Karl­sruhe Stadt­bahn, the rail sys­tem that serves a larger area around the city. This sys­tem makes it pos­si­ble to reach other towns in the re­gion, like Et­tlin­gen, Wörth am Rhein, Pforzheim, Bad Wild­bad, Bret­ten, Bruch­sal, Heil­bronn, Baden-Baden, and even Freuden­stadt in the Black For­est right from the city cen­tre. The Stadt­bahn is well known in trans­port cir­cles around the world for pi­o­neer­ing the con­cept of op­er­at­ing trams on train tracks, to achieve a more ef­fec­tive and...

    Jews set­tled in Karl­sruhe soon after its founding. They were at­tracted by the nu­mer­ous priv­i­leges granted by its founder to set­tlers, with­out dis­crim­i­na­tion as to creed. Of­fi­cial doc­u­ments at­test the pres­ence of sev­eral Jew­ish fam­i­lies at Karl­sruhe in 1717. A year later the city coun­cil ad­dressed to the mar­grave a re­port in which a ques­tion was raised as to the pro­por­tion of mu­nic­i­pal charges to be borne by the newly ar­rived Jews, who in that year formed an or­ga­nized con­gre­ga­tion, with Rabbi Nathan Uri Kohen of Metzat its head. A doc­u­ment dated 1726 gives the names of twenty-four Jews who had taken part in an elec­tion of mu­nic­i­pal of­fi­cers. As the city grew, per­mis­sion to set­tle there be­came less eas­ily ob­tained by Jews, and the com­mu­nity de­vel­oped more slowly. A 1752 Jewry or­di­nance stated Jews were for­bid­den to leave the city on Sun­days and Chris­t­ian hol­i­days, or to go out of their houses dur­ing church ser­vices,...

    Karl Benz (1844–1929), mechanical engineer and inventor of the first automobile as well as the founder of Benz & Co., Daimler-Benz, and Mercedes-Benz (now part of Daimler AG). He was born in the Ka...
    Siegfried Buback, (1920–1977), then-Attorney General of Germany who fell victim to terrorists of the Rote Armee Fraktionin April 1977 in Karlsruhe
    Dennis Aogo, German football defender who currently plays for VfB Stuttgart
    Christa Bauch, female bodybuilder
    Walther Bensemann is one of the founders of the first southern German soccer club Karlsruher FV and later he became one of the founders of DFB and the founder of Kicker, which is Germany's leading...
    Oliver Bierhoff, (born 1968), retired German football striker and former national team captain for the Germany and Italian Serie A clubs Udinese, A.C. Milan and Chievo; currently working as the Ger...
  6. My first assignment as a newly minted LT, was with the 78th Engr Bn (C), then stationed at a barracks north of Karlsruhe, Germany in 1964. Shortly thereafter we move to a station south of Karlsruhe (at Ettlingen) named Rheinland Kasserne. The 78th also included an ADM (Atomic Demoltion Munnitions) platoon.