Yahoo Web Search

  1. About 277,000 search results
  1. Oct 27, 2009 · Churchill was born at the family’s estate near Oxford on November 30, 1874. He was educated at the Harrow prep school, where he performed so poorly that he did not even bother to apply to Oxford or...

    • 4 min
  2. Mini Bio (1) Born in Blenheim Palace, the residence of his grandfather, the 7th Duke of Marlborough. His father was the Duke's third son, Lord Randolph Churchill. His mother, Jennie Jerome, was the daughter of an American financier. After passing through famous English public schools such as Harrow, he went on to fulfill his ambition for a life ...

    • Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill
    • WinnieThe British BulldogThe Father of Europe
  3. People also ask

    What was Winston Churchill’s family background?

    Did Churchill have anything going for him by 1899?

    Where did Winston Churchill go to school?

    What did Winston Churchill do in the First World War?

  4. Jan 19, 2009 · Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill, born at Blenheim Palace to the second son of a Duke, was brought up by a nanny in large houses full of servants. His education was typical of the Victorian aristocrat, passing from private boarding schools to Harrow and then to Sandhurst. He did not excel at all of his studies.

    • Winston Churchill’s Early Life
    • Churchill and Politics
    • Failures and Redemption
    • Wartime Prime Minister
    • Churchill’s Postwar Years
    • Churchill’s Death and Legacy
    • Churchill Controversy

    The eldest of two sons, Churchill was born on Nov. 30, 1874, at his family’s estate in Blenheim, Oxfordshire, England. His parents were politician Lord Randolph Churchill and Jennie Jerome, an American heiress. Winston Churchill was a direct descendant of the First Duke of Marlborough, and his American grandfather was a wealthy stock trader and min...

    The story of Churchill’s exploits made him something of a celebrity. The notoriety was useful as he was elected to the House of Commons as a Conservative in 1900 at the age of 25. A champion of social reform and improved conditions for workers, he came into conflict with Conservative views and by 1904 had "crossed the floor" to join the Liberal Par...

    Between the world wars, Churchill held several political posts including Secretary of State for War and Air and Secretary of State for the Colonies. His perspective on Britain’s preeminent position in the world was similar to many other leaders of the nation. "Churchill, like many politicians and soldiers of his day, was an ardent imperialist," Tuc...

    With the rise of Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany, Churchill vigorously opposed the British government’s policy of appeasement and argued for rearmament according to Richard Toye, professor of history at University of Exeter in his book "Winston Churchill: Politics, Strategy and Statecraft(opens in new tab)" (Bloomsbury Academic, 2017). Churchill unde...

    After the defeat of Germany in 1945, Churchill attended the Potsdam Conference, and the first national election in years loomed. On July 5, 1945, the Conservative Party lost in a landslide to the Labour Party, and Clement Attlee succeeded Churchill as Prime Minister. On the surface, it seemed that Churchill, the victorious wartime leader, would eas...

    After a series of strokes, Winston Churchill died at the age of 90, on January 24, 1965. Traditionally, the Queen is the last to arrive at a public event; however, Queen Elizabeth II broke protocol, arriving for Churchill’s state funeral before the family of the deceased in a poignant display of respect for the Churchill family. Possessed of a rapi...

    Despite his deserved place as one of the great leaders of the 20th century, Winston Churchill remains a controversial figure in some respects. His own steadfast belief that he was a man of destiny sometimes led to overbearing, rash and unsound decisions. His views on race and empire have recently come under scrutiny. "Regarding Churchill, the prese...

    • Churchills
    • Site
    • Architect
    • Funding The Construction
    • Design and Architecture
    • Interior
    • Pipe Organs
    • Park and Gardens
    • Failing Fortunes
    • 9th Duke of Marlborough

    John Churchill was born in Devon. Although his family had aristocratic relations, it belonged to the minor gentry rather than the upper echelons of 17th-century society. In 1678, Churchill married Sarah Jennings, and in April that year, he was sent by Charles II to The Hague to negotiate a convention on the deployment of the English army in Flander...

    The estate given by the nation to Marlborough for the new palace was the manor of Woodstock, sometimes called the Palace of Woodstock, which had been a royal demesne, in reality little more than a deer park. Legend has obscured the manor's origins. King Henry I enclosed the park to contain the deer. Henry II housed his mistress Rosamund Clifford (s...

    The architect selected for the ambitious project was a controversial one. The Duchess was known to favour Sir Christopher Wren, famous for St Paul's Cathedral and many other national buildings. The Duke however, following a chance meeting at a playhouse, is said to have commissioned Sir John Vanbrugh there and then. Vanbrugh, a popular dramatist, w...

    The precise responsibility for the funding of the new palace has always been a debatable subject, unresolved to this day. The palace as a reward was mooted within months of the Battle of Blenheim, at a time when Marlborough was still to gain many further victories on behalf of the country. That a grateful nation led by Queen Anne wished and intende...

    Vanbrugh planned Blenheim in perspective; that is, to be best viewed from a distance. As the site covers some seven acres (28,000 m²) this is also a necessity. The plan of the palace's principal block (or corps de logis) is a rectangle (see plan) pierced by two courtyards; these serve as little more than light wells. Contained behind the southern f...

    The internal layout of the rooms of the central block at Blenheim was defined by the court etiquette of the day. State apartments were designed as an axis of rooms of increasing importance and public use, leading to the chief room. The larger houses, like Blenheim, had two sets of state apartments each mirroring each other. The grandest and most pu...

    The Long Library organ was built in 1891 by the famous London firm of Henry Willis & Sons at a cost of £3,669. It replaced a previous organ built in 1888 by Isaac Abbott of Leeds, which was removed to St Swithun's church, Hither Green. Originally erected in the central bay, with its back to the water terraces, the Norwich firm of Norman & Beard mov...

    Blenheim sits in the centre of a large undulating park, a classic example of the English landscape garden movement and style. When Vanbrugh first cast his eyes over it in 1704 he immediately conceived a typically grandiose plan: through the park trickled the small River Glyme, and Vanbrugh envisaged this marshy brook traversed by the "finest bridge...

    On the death of the 1st Duke in 1722, as both his sons were dead, he was succeeded by his daughter Henrietta. This was an unusual succession and required a special Act of Parliament, as only sons can usually succeed to an English dukedom. When Henrietta died, the title passed to Marlborough's grandson Charles Spencer, Earl of Sunderland, whose moth...

    Charles, 9th Duke of Marlborough (1871–1934) can be credited with saving both the palace and the family. Inheriting the near-bankrupt dukedom in 1892, he was forced to find a quick and drastic solution to the problems. Prevented by the strict social dictates of late 19th-century society from earning money, he was left with one solution: he had to m...

  5. Winston Churchill was born on November 30, 1874. Winston was a stocky redhead with a speech problem. He was lazy at school, although he did like math and history.

  1. People also search for