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  1. Miss Bud, Edwin Drood's fiancée, has also caught the eye of the high-spirited and hot-tempered Neville Landless. Landless and Edwin Drood take an instant dislike to each other. Later Drood disappears under mysterious circumstances. The story is set in Cloisterham, a lightly disguised Rochester.

    • Charles Dickens, Fildes, Luke, Sir
    • Serialized and book form 1870
    • Plot
    • Characters
    • Suspicions and Hints
    • Original Publication
    • Continuations
    • The Trial of John Jasper
    • Adaptations
    • Pop Culture
    • References

    The novel begins as John Jasper leaves a London opium den. The next evening, Edwin Drood visits Jasper, who is the choirmaster at Cloisterham Cathedral. Edwin confides that he has misgivings about his betrothal to Rosa Bud. The next day, Edwin visits Rosa at the Nuns’ House, the boarding school where she lives. They quarrel good-naturedly, which they apparently do frequently during his visits. Meanwhile, Jasper, having an interest in the cathedral crypt, seeks the company of Durdles, a man who knows more about the crypt than anyone else. Neville Landless and his twin sister Helena are sent to Cloisterham for their education. Neville will study with the minor canon, Rev. Mr. Crisparkle; Helena will live at the Nuns’ House with Rosa. Neville confides to Rev. Mr Crisparkle that he had hated his cruel stepfather, while Rosa confides to Helena that she loathes and fears her music-master, Jasper. Neville is immediately smitten with Rosa and is indignant that Edwin prizes his betrothal lig...

    Edwin Drood: an orphan. When he comes of age, he plans to marry Rosa Bud and go to Egypt, working as an engineer with the firm in which his father had been a partner.
    Rosa Bud: an orphan and Edwin Drood’s fiancée. Their betrothal was arranged by their fathers.
    John Jasper: the choirmaster of Cloisterham Cathedral, Edwin Drood’s uncle and guardian, and Rosa Bud’s music master. He secretly loves Rosa. He visits an opium den in London. It is implied (see ev...
    Neville and Helena Landless: twin orphans. They are from Ceylon, but it is not clear to what extent they are Ceylonese. In their childhood they were mistreated and deprived. Neville is immediately...

    The murderer Although the killer is not revealed, it is generally believed that John Jasper, Edwin’s uncle, is the murderer. There are three reasons: John Forster had the plot described to him by Dickens: “The story … was to be that of the murder of a nephew by his uncle.” Luke Fildes, who illustrated the story, said that Dickens had told him, when they were discussing an illustration, “I must have the double necktie! It is necessary, for Jasper strangles Edwin Drood with it.” Dickens’s son Charles stated that his father had told him unequivocally that Jasper was the murderer. The book gives other hints: It describes a nightly scene in which Jasper goes secretly with Durdles to the graveyard. Jasper sees quicklime, at that time believed to hasten the decomposition of bodies. A day before he disappears, Edwin talks with Princess Puffer in the graveyard. She tells him “Ned” is in great danger. Later it turns out she has been following John Jasper from London, and he told her something...

    The Mystery of Edwin Droodwas scheduled to be published in twelve instalments (shorter than Dickens’s usual twenty) from April 1870 to February 1871, each costing one shilling and illustrated by Luke Fildes. Only six of the instalments were completed before Dickens’s death in 1870. It was therefore approximately half finished. 1. I: April 1870 (chapters 1–5) 2. II: May 1870 (chapters 6–9) 3. III: June 1870 (chapters 10–12) 4. IV: July 1870 (chapters 13–16) 5. V: August 1870 (chapters 17–20) 6. VI: September 1870 (chapters 21–23) Planned instalments never published: 1. VII: October 1870 2. VIII: November 1870 3. IX: December 1870 4. X: January 1871 5. XI, XII: February 1871

    Supplying a conclusion to The Mystery of Edwin Drood has occupied writers from the time of Dickens’ death to the present day. The first three attempts to complete the story were undertaken by Americans. The first, by Robert Henry Newell, published under the pen name Orpheus C. Kerr in 1870, was as much a parody as a continuation, transplanting the story to the United States. It is a “burlesque” farce rather than a serious attempt to continue in the spirit of the original story. The second ending was written by Henry Morford, a New York journalist. He travelled to Rochester with his wife and published the ending serially during his stay in England from 1871–1872. In this ending, Edwin Drood survives Jasper’s murder attempt. Datchery is Bazzard in disguise, but Helena disguises herself as well to overhear Jasper’s mumbling under the influence of opium. Entitled John Jasper’s Secret: Sequel to Charles Dickens’ Mystery of Edwin Drood, it was rumoured to have been authored by Charles Dic...

    In January 1914 the Dickens Fellowship organised a dramatic “trial” in the King’s Hall, Covent Garden. John Jasper (played by Frederick T. Harry) stood trial for the murder of Edwin Drood. G. K. Chesterton, best known for the Father Brown mystery stories, was the judge, and George Bernard Shaw was the foreman of the jury, which was made up of other authors. J. Cuming Walters, author of The Complete Edwin Drood, led the prosecution, while Cecil Chesterton acted for the defence. Proceedings were very light-hearted; Shaw in particular made wisecracks at the expense of others present. For instance, Shaw claimed that if the prosecution thought that producing evidence would influence the jury then “he little knows his functions”. The jury returned a verdict of manslaughter, Shaw stating that it was a compromise on the grounds that there was not enough evidence to convict Jasper but that they did not want to run the risk of being murdered in their beds. Both sides protested and demanded th...

    Films

    To date, there have been four film adaptations of The Mystery of Edwin Drood. The first two silent pictures released in 1909 (British) and 1914 (American) are unavailable to the general public and have been little-seen since they were released. These were followed by: 1. Mystery of Edwin Drood(1935) released by Universal Pictures and directed by Stuart Walker, starring Claude Rains as Jasper, Douglass Montgomery as Neville, Heather Angel as Rosa, Valerie Hobson as Helena, and David Manners as...

    Television

    The Mystery of Edwin Droodis a 1960 British television miniseries in eight episodes, starring Donald Sinden as John Jasper, Richard Pearson as Rev Crisparkle and Tim Seely as Edwin Drood. There was a BBC television version, adapted with an original ending by Gwyneth Hughes and directed by Diarmuid Lawrence, aired on BBC Two on 10 and 11 January 2012 and on the PBS series Masterpieceon 15 April 2012. Taina Edvina Druda (The Mystery of Edwin Drood) is a TV miniseries produced in Russia in 1980,...

    Radio

    On 5 and 12 January 1953, the CBS Suspense radio programme aired a two-part adaptation of The Mystery of Edwin Drood. It depicts John Jasper (played by Herbert Marshall) as the killer, tricked into giving himself away. A five-part adaptation based on the Leon Garfield completion written by David Buck and directed by Gordon House was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on the Classic Serial 4 March 1990 to 1 April 1990.The cast included Ian Holm as Jasper, John Moffatt as Datcherly, Gareth Thomas as Cris...

    In The Long Divorceby Edmund Crispin, the protagonist adopts the pseudonym Datchery when asked to investigate a crime.
    Edwin Drood is the name of a fictional band from the TV series Jonathan Creek.
    Edwin Drood is the name of the protagonist in the novel The Man with the Golden Torc, the first novel in the Secret History series by Simon R. Green.
    The 1999 novel Disgrace by J. M. Coetzee references Edwin Droodas the novel that Lucy reads before the crime on her farm.
  2. The Mystery of Edwin Drood. (miniseries) The Mystery of Edwin Drood is a 2012 British television adaptation of the unfinished 1870 novel by Charles Dickens, adapted with a new ending by Gwyneth Hughes, produced by Lisa Osborne, and directed by Diarmuid Lawrence. It was aired in the United Kingdom on BBC2 as two one-hour parts on 10 and 11 ...

    • Summary
    • Characters
    • Hints and Suspicions
    • Continuations
    • The Trial of John Jasper
    • Original Publication
    • Adaptations
    • Pop Culture References
    • External Links

    The novel begins as John Jasper leaves a London opium den.The next evening, Edwin Drood visits Jasper, who is the choirmaster at Cloisterham Cathedral. Edwin confides that he has misgivings about his betrothal to Rosa Bud. The next day, Edwin visits Rosa at the Nuns' House, the boarding school where she lives. They quarrel good-naturedly, which they apparently do frequently during his visits. Meanwhile, Jasper, having an interest in the cathedral crypt, seeks the company of Durdles, a man who knows more about the crypt than anyone else. Neville Landless and his twin sister Helena are sent to Cloisterham for their education. Neville will study with the minor canon, Rev. Mr. Crisparkle; Helena will live at the Nuns' House with Rosa. Neville confides to Rev. Mr Crisparkle that he had hated his cruel stepfather, while Rosa confides to Helena that she loathes and fears her music-master, Jasper. Neville is immediately smitten with Rosa and is indignant that Edwin prizes his betrothal ligh...

    Edwin Drood: an orphan. When he comes of age, he plans to marry Rosa Bud and go to Egypt, working as an engineer with the firm in which his father had been a partner.
    Rosa Bud: an orphan and Edwin Drood's fiancée. Their betrothal was arranged by their fathers.
    John Jasper: the choirmaster of Cloisterham Cathedral, Edwin Drood's uncle and guardian, and Rosa Bud's music master. He secretly loves Rosa. He visits an opium den in London. It is implied (see ev...
    Neville and Helena Landless: twin orphans. They are from Ceylon, but it is not clear to what extent they are Ceylonese. In their childhood they were mistreated and deprived. Neville is immediately...

    The murderer

    Although the killer is not revealed, it is generally believed that John Jasper, Edwin's uncle, is the murderer. There are three reasons: 1. John Forster had the plot described to him by Dickens: "The story ... was to be that of the murder of a nephew by his uncle." 2. Luke Fildes, who illustrated the story, said that Dickens had told him, when they were discussing an illustration, "I must have the double necktie! It is necessary, for Jasper strangles Edwin Drood with it." 3. Dickens's son Cha...

    Dick Datchery

    Datchery appears some time after Edwin's disappearance and keeps a close eye on Jasper. A strong argument can be made for Tartar. Datchery is described at one point as walking with his hands clasped behind him – "as the wont of such buffers is", a walking stance frequently associated with naval officers pacing a quarter-deck. Frequently there are similar expressions used to describe both characters. There are hints that he is in disguise, and this theme has been taken up in adaptations of the...

    Supplying a conclusion to The Mystery of Edwin Droodhas occupied writers from the time of Dickens's death to the present day. The first three attempts to complete the story were undertaken by Americans. The first, by Robert Henry Newell, published under the pen name Orpheus C. Kerr in 1870,was as much a parody as a continuation, transplanting the story to the United States. It is a "burlesque" farce rather than a serious attempt to continue in the spirit of the original story. The second ending was written by Henry Morford, a New York journalist. He travelled to Rochester with his wife and published the ending serially during his stay in England from 1871–1872. In this ending, Edwin Drood survives Jasper's murder attempt. Datchery is Bazzard in disguise, but Helena disguises herself as well to overhear Jasper's mumbling under the influence of opium. Entitled John Jasper's Secret: Sequel to Charles Dicken's Mystery of Edwin Drood, it was rumoured to have been authored by Charles Dick...

    In January 1914, John Jasper (played by Frederick T. Harry) stood trial for the murder of Edwin Drood in London. The "trial" was organised by the Dickens Fellowship. G. K. Chesterton, best known for the Father Brown mystery stories, was the judge, and George Bernard Shaw was the foreman of the jury, which was made up of other authors. J. Cuming Walters, author of The Complete Edwin Drood, led the prosecution, while Cecil Chestertonacted for the defence. Proceedings were very light-hearted; Shaw in particular made wisecracks at the expense of others present. For instance, Shaw claimed that if the prosecution thought that producing evidence would influence the jury then "he little knows his functions". The jury returned a verdict of manslaughter, Shaw stating that it was a compromise on the grounds that there was not enough evidence to convict Jasper but that they did not want to run the risk of being murdered in their beds. Both sides protested and demanded that the jury be discharge...

    The Mystery of Edwin Drood was scheduled to be published in twelve instalments (shorter than Dickens's usual twenty) from April 1870 to February 1871, each costing one shilling and illustrated by Luke Fildes. Only six of the instalments were completed before Dickens's death in 1870. It was therefore approximately half finished. 1. I: April 1870 (chapters 1–5) 2. II: May 1870 (chapters 6–9) 3. III: June 1870 (chapters 10–12) 4. IV: July 1870 (chapters 13–16) 5. V: August 1870 (chapters 17–20) 6. VI: September 1870 (chapters 21–23) Planned instalments never published: 1. VII: October 1870 2. VIII: November 1870 3. IX: December 1870 4. X: January 1871 5. XI, XII: February 1871

    Films

    To date, there have been four film adaptations of The Mystery of Edwin Drood. The first two were silent pictures released in 1909 and 1914. They are unavailable to the general public and have been little-seen since they were released. These were followed by: 1. Mystery of Edwin Drood (1935) released by Universal Pictures and directed by Stuart Walker, starring Claude Rains as Jasper, Douglass Montgomery as Neville, Heather Angel as Rosa, Valerie Hobson as Helena, and David Mannersas Drood. 2....

    Television

    A two-part drama, adapted with an original ending by Gwyneth Hughes and directed by Diarmuid Lawrence, aired on BBC Two on 10 and 11 January 2012 and on the PBS series Masterpieceon 15 April 2012.

    Radio

    On 5 and 12 January 1953, the CBS Suspense radio programme aired a two-part adaptation of The Mystery of Edwin Drood. It depicts John Jasper (played by Herbert Marshall) as the killer, tricked into giving himself away. A five-part adaptation based on the Leon Garfield completion written by David Buck and directed by Gordon House was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on the Classic Serial 4 March 1990 to 1 April 1990. The cast included Ian Holm as Jasper, John Moffatt as Datcherly, Gareth Thomas as Cri...

    In The Long Divorce by Edmund Crispin, the protagonist adopts the pseudonym Datchery when asked to investigate a crime.
    Edwin Drood is the name of a fictional band from the TV series Jonathan Creek.
    Edwin Drood is the name of the protagonist in the novel The Man with the Golden Torc, the first novel in the Secret History series by Simon R. Green.
    The 1999 novel Disgrace by J. M. Coetzee references Edwin Droodas the novel that Lucy reads before the crime on her farm.
    The Mystery of Edwin Drood at Internet Archive.
    The Mystery of Edwin Drood public domain audiobook at LibriVox
    The Mystery of Edwin Drood—The original manuscript of the novel, held by the Victoria and Albert Museum (requires Adobe Flash).
  3. Drood later disappears under mysterious circumstances. The story is set in Cloisterham, a lightly disguised Rochester. Mr Crisparkle, for example, lives in a clergy house in Minor Canon Corner, which corresponds to a genuine address within the precincts of Rochester Cathedral, namely Minor Canon Row.

    • World Heritage Encyclopedia
    • The Mystery of Edwin Drood
  4. Mar 10, 2019 · THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD by the Connecticut Repertory Theatre (CRT) at the Harriet S. Jorgensen Theatre on the campus of the University of Connecticut in Storrs, CT closes on March 10.

  5. Jun 15, 2012 · Dickens also chose another house in Rochester to be “The Nuns’ House” in The Mystery of Edwin Drood. “Eastgate House” is an Elizabethan townhouse, which has been a Dickens Museum since 1923. In its grounds is the Swiss chalet in which Dickens penned several of his novels.