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  1. John Harvard (clergyman) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Harvard_(clergyman)

    John Harvard (bapt. November 29, 1607 – September 14, 1638) was an English minister in Colonial America whose deathbed bequest to the "schoale or Colledge" founded two years earlier by the Massachusetts Bay Colony was so gratefully received that it was consequently ordered "that the Colledge agreed upon formerly to bee built at Cambridg shalbee called Harvard Colledge."

  2. Somerville, Massachusetts - Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org/en/Somerville,_Massachusetts

    Somerville (/ˈsʌmərvɪl/ SUM-ər-vil) is a city located directly to the northwest of Boston, and north of Cambridge, in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. As of 2019[update], the United States Census estimated the city to have a total population of 81,360 people. With an area of 4.11 square miles, the city has a density of 19,893 people per square mile, making it the most ...

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  4. Northeastern University - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northeastern_University...

    Northeastern University (NU or NEU) is a private research university in Boston, Massachusetts.Established in 1898, the university offers undergraduate and graduate programs on its main campus in Boston as well as regional campuses in Charlotte, North Carolina; Seattle, Washington; San Jose, California; San Francisco, California; Toronto, Vancouver, and Portland, Maine.

    • 1898; 122 years ago
    • Lux, Veritas, Virtus (Latin)
  5. Columbia Heights (Washington, D.C.)

    enacademic.com/dic.nsf/enwiki/11564797

    This article is about the neighborhood. For the Metro station, see Columbia Heights (WMATA station). The Tivoli Theatre, a renovated landmark on 14th Street NW, is a symbol of Columbia Heights. Columbia Heights is a neighborhood in central…

    • Life
    • Founder of Harvard College
    • Memorials and Tributes
    • Further Reading
    • External Links

    Early life

    Har­vard was born and raised in South­wark, Sur­rey, Eng­land, (now part of Lon­don), the fourth of nine chil­dren of Robert Har­vard (1562–1625), a butcher and tav­ern owner, and his wife Kather­ine Rogers (1584–1635), a na­tive of Strat­ford-upon-Avon whose fa­ther, Thomas Rogers (1540–1611), was an as­so­ci­ate of Shake­speare's fa­ther (both served on the bor­ough cor­po­ra­tion's coun­cil). Har­vard was bap­tised in the parish church of St Sav­iour's (now South­wark Cathe­dral) and at­te...

    Marriage and career

    In 1636, Har­vard mar­ried Ann Sadler (1614–55) of Ring­mer, sis­ter of his col­lege class­mate John Sadler's, at St Michael the Archangel Church, in the parish of South Malling, Lewes, East Sussex.[citation needed] In the spring or sum­mer of 1637, the cou­ple em­i­grated to New Eng­land, where Har­vard be­came a free­man of Mass­a­chu­setts and, set­tling in Charlestown, a teach­ing elder of the First Church there and an as­sis­tant preacher. In 1638, a tract of land was deeded[clarificatio...

    Death

    On 14 Sep­tem­ber 1638, Har­vard died of tu­ber­cu­lo­sis and was buried at Charlestown's Phipps Street Bury­ing Ground. In 1828, Har­vard Uni­ver­sity alumni erected a gran­ite mon­u­ment to his mem­ory there, his orig­i­nal stone hav­ing dis­ap­peared dur­ing the Amer­i­can Rev­o­lu­tion.

    Two years be­fore Har­vard's death the Great and Gen­eral Court of the Massachu­setts Bay Colony‍—‌de­sir­ing to "ad­vance learn­ing and per­pet­u­ate it to pos­ter­ity: dread­ing to leave an il­lit­er­ate min­istry to the churches, when our pre­sent min­is­ters shall lie in the dust"‍—‌ap­pro­pri­ated £400 to­ward a "schoale or colledge" at what was then called Newtowne.In an oral will spo­ken to his wife the child­less Har­vard, who had in­her­ited con­sid­er­able sums from his fa­ther, mother, and brother,be­queathed to the school £780‍—‌half of his mon­e­tary es­tate‍—‌with the re­main­der to his wife;per­haps more importantly he also gave his scholar's li­brary com­pris­ing some 329 ti­tles (to­tal­ing 400 vol­umes, some ti­tles being mul­ti­vol­ume works).:192In grat­i­tude, it was sub­se­quently or­dered "that theColledgeagreed upon for­merly tobeebuilt atCam­bridg shal­beecalled Har­vardColledge." (Even be­fore Har­vard's death, New­towne had been renamed Cam­bridge, after t...

    A statue in Har­vard's honor—not, how­ever, a like­ness of him, there being noth­ing to in­di­cate what he had looked like—is a promi­nent fea­ture of Har­vard Yard (see John Har­vard statue) and was fea­tured on a 1986 stamp, part of the United States Postal Ser­vice's Great Amer­i­cans se­ries. A fig­ure rep­re­sent­ing him also ap­pears in a stained-glass win­dow in the chapel of Em­manuel Col­lege, Uni­ver­sity of Cam­bridge. The John Har­vard Li­brary in South­wark, Lon­don, is named in Har­vard's honor, as is the Har­vard Bridge that con­nects Boston to Cambridge.There is a memo­r­ial win­dow in his honor in South­wark Cathe­dral.

    Rendle, William (1885). John Harvard, St. Saviour's, Southwark, and Harvard University, U.S.A. London: J.C. Francis.
    Shelley, Henry C. (1907). John Harvard and His Times. Boston, MA: Little, Brown, and Co.
    Potter, Alfred Claghorn (1913). Catalogue of John Harvard's library. Cambridge: J. Wilson.
  6. Wikimania 2006/Announcements - Meta

    meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Wikimania_2006/Announcements

    The Wikimania Awards were created to promote the creation of excellent free content around the world. The Awards are being held in conjunction with Wikimania 2006 (August 4-6, at Harvard University), the second annual international conference celebrating Wikimedia's projects and the use of wikis to organize knowledge.

  7. Northeastern University (NU, formerly NEU) is a private research university in Boston, Massachusetts, established in 1898.It is categorized as an R1 institution (Doctoral Universities: Highest Research Activity) by the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education.

  8. John Harvard (clergyman) - The Reader Wiki, Reader View of ...

    thereaderwiki.com/en/John_Harvard_(clergyman)

    John Harvard (bapt. November 29, 1607 – September 14, 1638) was an English minister in Colonial America whose deathbed bequest to the "schoale or Colledge" founded two years earlier by the Massachusetts Bay Colony was so gratefully received that it was consequently ordered "that the Colledge agreed upon formerly to bee built at Cambridg shalbee called Harvard Colledge."

  9. College Football Playoff – 4 team playoff system for determining national champions at the highest level of college football beginning in 2014. Bowl Championship Series – The primary method of determining the national champion at the highest level of college football from 1998–2013; preceded by the Bowl Alliance (1995–1997) and the Bowl ...

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