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    • What was Sarek's relationship with his son Sybok?

      • Captain Jean-Luc Picard, who mind melded with Sarek before he died, also mind melds with Spock in order to share Sarek's thoughts and feelings about his son. Little is known about Sarek's relationship with his oldest son Sybok, but presumably it was a difficult one since Sybok rejected Vulcan ways and was banished from the planet.
  1. Teaser. On a shoreline on Vulcan, Sarek sits in meditation while his wife Amanda brings a smoking bowl of incense and sets it in front of him. As the sounds of a beating heart and heavy breathing drown out the crashing of the waves, Sarek's eyes open, his expression stricken. " Michael! " he gasps.

  2. Here we are at the end in one of the most epic space battle Star Trek has ever put to screen. But was this a Wrath of Khan, or did we descend Into Darkness? ...

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  4. John Carter is having trouble sleeping, so he goes out for a walk and a smoke in the middle of the night. From season 6 of ER, episode 21: Such Sweet Sorrow.

  5. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › SarekSarek - Wikipedia

    Sarek / ˈsærɛk / is a fictional character in the Star Trek media franchise. He is a Vulcan astrophysicist, the Vulcan ambassador to the United Federation of Planets, and father of Spock. The character was originally played by Mark Lenard in the episode "Journey to Babel" in 1967. Lenard later voiced Sarek in the animated series, and appeared ...

  6. Apr 14, 2019 · Goodbyes are in order as Michael Burnham and crew set the stage to make an unexpected sacrifice for the good of the federation. T he latest episode of Star Trek Discovery, “Such Sweet Sorrow ...

  7. Apr 16, 2019 · Here then was an episode which in every way possible lived out the wretchedly-melancholic sadness of Shakespeare’s lines from Romeo and Juliet – “Parting is such sweet sorrow that I shall say goodnight till it be morrow.” – and which underscored the deep and abiding truth of two things – family, real or created, is stronger than ...