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  1. So today, as an Orthodox Christian, I don’t have to feel guilty for my imperfections; I can offer them to Christ and allow His power to be made perfect in my weakness (2 Cor 12:9). All of us come to Christ as imperfect people, as we are, but we don’t stay that way. He transfigures us to be more like Him the longer we stay close to Him. *****.

    • I Believe The Orthodox Church Really Is The One, True Church of Christ.
    • Orthodoxy Gives Me Something to do.
    • Orthodoxy Gives Me A Way to See and Touch God physically.
    • Change Is Really Hard.
    • Orthodoxy Really Is One Church.
    • Orthodoxy Is A Faith For The Whole Life.
    • Orthodoxy Is A Faith For The Whole World.
    • Orthodoxy Is A Faith For The Whole person.
    • Orthodoxy Is Both Mystical and Rational.
    • Orthodoxy Is ascetical.

    There’s a lot that could be said here, but the reason why I believe this is that I examined both the Scriptures and the early history of Christianity, and I became convinced that the only church that matches them both is Orthodoxy. Particularly formative for me were the writings of St. Ignatius of Antioch, a disciple of the Apostle John. The church...

    I don’t mean that I was bored and needed something to entertain me. I mean that the Christian life as I had been taught it prior to becoming Orthodox was essentially non-critical. I had been “saved,” and there was really nothing criticalto do after that. I should try to be moral, of course, and get other people to get saved, too, but those things w...

    The Son of God became the Son of Mary, and that means that He became visible and touchable in a truly material way. In Orthodoxy, the implications of the doctrine of the Incarnation are that the divine presence — holiness — actually becomes present in and alters the material world. Now, one can argue that that presence is uniquely present only in o...

    People sometimes joke that Orthodoxy is not really an “organized religion,” with emphasis on “organized.” There is no pope handing down uniform instructions to the whole Church; our chiefest prelates often can’t seem to get along; and it seems like we’re never going to get around to holding that Great and Holy Council we’ve been talking about for n...

    Unlike the denominationalism of the Protestant world, the various churches of Orthodoxy really do have to talk to each other and work things out. A Presbyterian and a Lutheran may each recognize each other as Christian, but they have almost no stake in each other’s internal church life. The same even holds true of someone belonging to the PCA and s...

    Because Orthodoxy comes with a vast set of expressions of its tradition, you can never exhaust it all. There is always something new not just to learn but to become. While we don’t really “arrive” until the next life (and I’d argue even that is not an arrival; that is, it’s not the end of the road of salvation), there are many way-stations in this ...

    There are no “target demographics” for Orthodoxy. We don’t do market research to figure out how to attract young people, old people, urban people, suburban people, or whatever particular demographic we might desire for our parish. A parish can often have a certain degree of commonality among members, but that isn’t by inherent design. There was no ...

    Mankind is not just emotionally moved by beauty, but he aches to be near it, to create it as much as that is possible. More than any other iteration of Christian faith, the Orthodox Church knows how to envelop the worshiper with beauty in all five (or more!) senses, both otherworldly beauty that transports the worshiper and otherworldly beauty that...

    Some Orthodox will oppose the mystical to the rational, but that’s a mistake, I believe. For all the apophatic theology (theology which emphasizes our inability to know God with our minds), there is also a lot of cataphatic theology (theology that makes clear, positive truth claims) in the tradition of the Church. We don’t have to choose one or the...

    No Christian body takes asceticism as seriously as Orthodoxy does. Roman Catholicism has it in its tradition, but it is mostly ignored. Yet Orthodoxy expects all Christians to fast, to stand vigil, to be as non-possessive as possible, etc., and it provides a programme for how to do that. You don’t have to make it up for yourself, because the tradit...

  2. Oct 25, 2023 · I became an Orthodox Christian because I was drawn to the beauty and depth of the ancient liturgical traditions, the rich spiritual heritage, and the strong sense of community. The Orthodox Church offered me a way to connect with God in a profound way and live out my faith in a tangible and meaningful manner.

  3. journeytoorthodoxy.com › 2015 › 11Why I Am Orthodox

    Nov 11, 2015 · There are many reasons why I am Orthodox, but the Church’s uncompromising loyalty to the ancient Christian faith is a major one. I am thankful that it has been preserved over the centuries in order to provide an alternative to today’s empty relativism and the worship of modernity. Pontius Pilate asked,

    • I believe the Orthodox Church really is the one, true Church of Christ. There’s a lot that could be said here, but the reason why I believe this is that I examined both the Scriptures and the early history of Christianity, and I became convinced that the only church that matches them both is Orthodoxy.
    • Orthodoxy gives me something to do. I don’t mean that I was bored and needed something to entertain me. I mean that the Christian life as I had been taught it prior to becoming Orthodox was essentially non-critical.
    • Orthodoxy gives me a way to see and touch God physically. The Son of God became the Son of Mary, and that means that He became visible and touchable.
    • Change is really hard. People sometimes joke that Orthodoxy is not really an “organized religion,” with emphasis on “organized.” There is no pope handing down uniform instructions to the whole Church; our chiefest prelates often can’t seem to get along; and it seems like we’re never going to get around to holding that Great and Holy Council we’ve been talking about for nearly a century.
  4. 5 days ago · The official designation of the church in Eastern Orthodox liturgical or canonical texts is “the Orthodox Catholic Church.”. Because of the historical links of Eastern Orthodoxy with the Eastern Roman Empire and Byzantium (Constantinople), however, in English usage it is referred to as the “Eastern” or “Greek Orthodox” Church.

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  6. Sep 1, 2014 · Wearing a cross, displaying an icon are public expressions of the identity that tell others, “I am an Orthodox Christian.” Learning about Orthodox Christianity, reading the Bible, the lives of saints, the writings of the past, going to Sunday school, attending a lecture, reading Orthodox literature also shape an Orthodox identity.

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