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      • (Camels are unclean because they chew their cud but do not have divided hoofs.) International Standard Version except you are not to eat the following animals that have divided hooves or ruminate their cud: the camel (because it chews the cud but doesn't have divided hooves, it is to be unclean for you), JPS Tanakh 1917
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    Is it unclean to eat a camel?

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    Which animals are unclean for You?

    Can you eat a camel with a split hoof?

  2. To keep the Israelites distinct from other nations. Many also of these forbidden animals were objects of superstition and idolatry to the heathen. 3. The people were taught to make distinctions between the holy and unholy in their companions and intimate connexions. 4. The law forbad, not only the eating of the unclean beasts, but the touching of them.

  3. Only, this you do not eat, of those bringing up the cud, and of those dividing the hoof: the camel, though it is bringing up the cud, yet the hoof is not dividing—it [is] unclean to you; NET Bible However, you must not eat these from among those that chew the cud and have divided hooves: The camel is unclean to you because it chews the cud even though its hoof is not divided.

    • (24-28) Disposal of The Carcasses of Unclean animals.
    • (29-30) More Unclean Animals: Reptiles and Other Creeping things.
    • (31-38) The Transmission of uncleanness from Unclean animals.
    • (39-40) Carcasses of Clean animals.
    • (41-43) Creeping Animals Considered unclean.
    • (44-47) The Purpose of God’s Dietary Laws.

    ‘By these you shall become unclean; whoever touches the carcass of any of them shall be unclean until evening; whoever carries part of the carcass of any of them shall wash his clothes and be unclean until evening: The carcass of any animal which divides the foot, but is not cloven-hoofed or does not chew the cud, is unclean to you. Everyone who touches it shall be unclean. And whatever goes on its paws, among all kinds of animals that go on all fours, those are unclean to you. Whoever touches any such carcass shall be unclean until evening. Whoever carries any such carcass shall wash his clothes and be unclean until evening. It is unclean to you. a. Whoever touches the carcass of any of them shall be unclean until evening: Unclean animals, when dead, couldn’t just be left in the community to rot; they had to be disposed of. But the people who disposed of the unclean animals had to deal with their uncleanness by washing and a brief (until evening) quarantine. i. This meant that if a...

    “These also shall be unclean to you among the creeping things that creep on the earth: the mole, the mouse, and the large lizard after its kind; the gecko, the monitor lizard, the sand reptile, the sand lizard, and the chameleon. a. The mole, the mouse: This brief grouping of animals that are creeping things that creep on the earth includes mammals such as the mole and the mouse. These are also excluded based on the requirements of verses 1-8 but are repeated here for clarity. b. The large lizard after its kind; the gecko: In addition, these reptiles (also creeping things that creep on the earth) could not be eaten.

    These are unclean to you among all that creep. Whoever touches them when they are dead shall be unclean until evening. Anything on which any of them falls, when they are dead shall be unclean, whether it is any item of wood or clothing or skin or sack, whatever item it is, in which any work is done, it must be put in water. And it shall be unclean until evening; then it shall be clean. Any earthen vessel into which any of them falls you shall break; and whatever is in it shall be unclean: in such a vessel, any edible food upon which water falls becomes unclean, and any drink that may be drunk from it becomes unclean. And everything on which a part of any such carcass falls shall be unclean; whether it is an oven or cooking stove, it shall be broken down; for they are unclean, and shall be unclean to you. Nevertheless a spring or a cistern, in which there is plenty of water, shall be clean, but whatever touches any such carcass becomes unclean. And if a part of any such carcass falls...

    ‘And if any animal which you may eat dies, he who touches its carcass shall be unclean until evening. He who eats of its carcass shall wash his clothes and be unclean until evening. He also who carries its carcass shall wash his clothes and be unclean until evening. a. If any animal which you may eat dies: Seemingly, these laws apply to the natural death of clean animals, not to their butchering for food or death for sacrifice. b. Shall wash his clothes and be unclean until evening: Those handling such carcasses were ceremonially unclean and needed to be cleansed by washing and a brief quarantine.

    ‘And every creeping thing that creeps on the earth shall be an abomination. It shall not be eaten. Whatever crawls on its belly, whatever goes on all fours, or whatever has many feet among all creeping things that creep on the earth—these you shall not eat, for they are an abomination. You shall not make yourselves abominable with any creeping thing that creeps; nor shall you make yourselves unclean with them, lest you be defiled by them. a. Every creeping thing that creeps on the earth shall be an abomination: Many of these animals were considered in verses 29-30. For clarity and emphasis, they are repeated. b. You shall not make yourselves abominable with any creeping thing: It was considered highly sinful and even idolatrous to eat these forbidden creeping things. In the Old Testament, the idea of an abominationis often linked to idolatry.

    For I am the LORD your God. You shall therefore consecrate yourselves, and you shall be holy; for I am holy. Neither shall you defile yourselves with any creeping thing that creeps on the earth. For I am the LORD who brings you up out of the land of Egypt, to be your God. You shall therefore be holy, for I am holy. “This is the law of the animals and the birds and every living creature that moves in the waters, and of every creature that creeps on the earth, to distinguish between the unclean and the clean, and between the animal that may be eaten and the animal that may not be eaten.’” a. For I am the LORD your God: God claims the right to speak to every area of our life, including what we eat. He had the right to tell Israel what to eat and what not to eat. b. You shall therefore consecrate yourselves: One great purpose of the dietary laws of Israel was to consecratethem – to sanctify or set them apart – from the Gentile nations. It made fellowship with those who did not serve God...

  4. 6 And you may eat every animal with cloven hooves, having the hoof split into two parts, and that chews the cud, among the animals. 7 Nevertheless, of those that chew the cud or have cloven hooves, you shall not eat, such as these: the camel, the hare, and the rock hyrax; for they chew the cud but do not have cloven hooves; they are unclean for you .

  5. As he goes forth, he meets one leading a camel along. The sight of this animal, marked as unclean in the law, stirs up his soul to reflect upon God’s having His eye on His people to see if they avoid sin and remember His revealed will; and just because this animal was one of those that it would have been difficult

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