Yahoo Web Search

  1. Dictionary - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Dictionary

    A dictionary is a listing of lexemes from the lexicon of one or more specific languages, often arranged alphabetically (or by radical and stroke for ideographic languages), which may include information on definitions, usage, etymologies, pronunciations, translation, etc..

    • History

      The oldest known dictionaries were cuneiform tablets with...

    • Types

      In a general dictionary, each word may have multiple...

    • Pronunciation

      In many languages, such as the English language, the...

    • Examples

      Histories and descriptions of the dictionaries of other...

  2. List of online dictionaries - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › List_of_online_dictionaries

    An online dictionary is a dictionary that is accessible via the Internet through a web browser.They can be made available in a number of ways: free, free with a paid subscription for extended or more professional content, or a paid-only service.

  3. Dictionary - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Online_dictionary

    Dictionary. A dictionary is a type of book which explains the meanings of words or, more precisely, lexemes. The words are arranged in alphabetical order so that they can be found quickly. The word "dictionary" comes from the Latin "dictio" ("saying"). There are several types of dictionaries: dictionaries which explain words and how they are ...

  4. Oxford English Dictionary - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Oxford_English_Dictionary
    • Historical Nature
    • Entries and Relative Size
    • History
    • Formats
    • Relationship to Other Oxford Dictionaries
    • Spelling
    • Reception
    • See Also
    • Further Reading
    • External Links

    As a historical dictionary, the Oxford English Dictionary features entries in which the earliest ascertainable recorded sense of a word, whether current or obsolete, is presented first, and each additional sense is presented in historical order according to the date of its earliest ascertainable recorded use.Following each definition are several brief illustrating quotations presented in chronological order from the earliest ascertainable use of the word in that sense to the last ascertainable use for an obsolete sense, to indicate both its life span and the time since its desuetude, or to a relatively recent use for current ones. The format of the OED's entries has influenced numerous other historical lexicography projects. The forerunners to the OED, such as the early volumes of the Deutsches Wörterbuch, had initially provided few quotations from a limited number of sources, whereas the OEDeditors preferred larger groups of quite short quotations from a wide selection of authors a...

    According to the publishers, it would take a single person 120 years to "key in" the 59 million words of the OED second edition, 60 years to proofread them, and 540 megabytes to store them electronically. As of 30 November 2005, the Oxford English Dictionary contained approximately 301,100 main entries. Supplementing the entry headwords, there are 157,000 bold-type combinations and derivatives; 169,000 italicized-bold phrases and combinations; 616,500 word-forms in total, including 137,000 pronunciations; 249,300 etymologies; 577,000 cross-references; and 2,412,400 usage quotations. The dictionary's latest, complete print edition (second edition, 1989) was printed in 20 volumes, comprising 291,500 entries in 21,730 pages. The longest entry in the OED2 was for the verb set, which required 60,000 words to describe some 430 senses. As entries began to be revised for the OED3 in sequence starting from M, the longest entry became make in 2000, then put in 2007, then runin 2011. Despite i...

    Origins

    The dictionary began as a Philological Society project of a small group of intellectuals in London (and unconnected to Oxford University)::103–4,112 Richard Chenevix Trench, Herbert Coleridge, and Frederick Furnivall, who were dissatisfied with the existing English dictionaries. The society expressed interest in compiling a new dictionary as early as 1844, but it was not until June 1857 that they began by forming an "Unregistered Words Committee" to search for words that were unlisted or poor...

    Early editors

    Richard Chenevix Trench (1807–1886) played the key role in the project's first months, but his appointment as Dean of Westminster meant that he could not give the dictionary project the time that it required. He withdrew and Herbert Coleridge became the first editor.:8–9 On 12 May 1860, Coleridge's dictionary plan was published and research was started. His house was the first editorial office. He arrayed 100,000 quotation slips in a 54 pigeon-hole grid.:9 In April 1861, the group published t...

    Oxford editors

    During the 1870s, the Philological Society was concerned with the process of publishing a dictionary with such an immense scope. They had pages printed by publishers, but no publication agreement was reached; both the Cambridge University Press and the Oxford University Press were approached. The OUP finally agreed in 1879 (after two years of negotiating by Sweet, Furnivall, and Murray) to publish the dictionary and to pay Murray, who was both the editor and the Philological Society president...

    Compact editions

    In 1971, the 13-volume OED1 (1933) was reprinted as a two-volume Compact Edition, by photographically reducing each page to one-half its linear dimensions; each compact edition page held four OED1 pages in a four-up ("4-up") format. The two volume letters were A and P; the first supplement was at the second volume's end. The Compact Edition included, in a small slip-case drawer, a magnifying glass to help in reading reduced type. Many copies were inexpensively distributed through book clubs....

    Electronic versions

    Once the dictionary was digitized and online, it was also available to be published on CD-ROM. The text of the first edition was made available in 1987. Afterward, three versions of the second edition were issued. Version 1 (1992) was identical in content to the printed second edition, and the CD itself was not copy-protected. Version 2 (1999) included the Oxford English Dictionary Additionsof 1993 and 1997. Version 3.0 was released in 2002 with additional words from the OED3 and software imp...

    The OED's utility and renown as a historical dictionary have led to numerous offspring projects and other dictionaries bearing the Oxford name, though not all are directly related to the OEDitself. The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, originally started in 1902 and completed in 1933, is an abridgement of the full work that retains the historical focus, but does not include any words which were obsolete before 1700 except those used by Shakespeare, Milton, Spenser, and the King James Bible. A completely new edition was produced from the OED2 and published in 1993,with revisions in 2002 and 2007. The Concise Oxford Dictionary is a different work, which aims to cover current English only, without the historical focus. The original edition, mostly based on the OED1, was edited by Francis George Fowler and Henry Watson Fowler and published in 1911, before the main work was completed.Revised editions appeared throughout the twentieth century to keep it up to date with changes in English...

    The OED lists British headword spellings (e.g., labour, centre) with variants following (labor, center, etc.). For the suffix more commonly spelt -ise in British English, OUP policy dictates a preference for the spelling -ize, e.g., realize vs. realise and globalization vs. globalisation. The rationale is etymological, in that the English suffix is mainly derived from the Greek suffix -ιζειν, (-izein), or the Latin -izāre. However, -ze is also sometimes treated as an Americanism insofar as the -ze suffix has crept into words where it did not originally belong, as with analyse (British English), which is spelt analyzein American English.

    British prime minister Stanley Baldwin described the OED as a "national treasure". Author Anu Garg, founder of Wordsmith.org, has called it a "lex icon". Tim Bray, co-creator of Extensible Markup Language (XML), credits the OED as the developing inspiration of that markup language. However, despite its claims of authority, the dictionary has been criticized since at least the 1960s from various angles. It has become a target precisely because of its scope, its claims to authority, its British-centredness and relative neglect of World Englishes, its implied but not acknowledged focus on literary language and, above all, its influence. The OED, as a commercial product, has always had to manoeuvre a thin line between PR, marketing and scholarship and one[who?] can argue that its biggest problem is the critical uptake of the work by the interested public.[citation needed] In his review of the 1982 supplement, University of Oxford linguist Roy Harris writes that criticizing the OED is ex...

    Brewer, Charlotte (8 October 2019). "Oxford English Dictionary Research". Examining the OED. The project sets out to investigate the principles and practice behind the Oxford English Dictionary...
    Brewer, Charlotte (2007), Treasure-House of the Language: the Living OED (hardcover), Yale University Press, ISBN 978-0-300-12429-3
    Dickson, Andrew (23 February 2018). "Inside the OED: can the world's biggest dictionary survive the internet?". the Guardian.
    Gilliver, Peter (2016), The Making of the Oxford English Dictionary (hardcover), Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0-199-28362-0
    Oxford University Press pages: Second Edition, Additions Series Volume 1, Additions Series Volume 2, Additions Series Volume 3, The Compact Oxford English Dictionary New Edition, 20-volume printed...
    • United Kingdom
    • 1884–1928 (first edition), 1989 (second edition), Third edition in preparation
  5. Webster's Dictionary - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Merriam-Webster_Online
    • Overview
    • Noah Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language
    • Other dictionaries with Webster's name
    • Webster's Third New International Dictionary (1961)
    • Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary
    • The name Webster used by others

    Webster's Dictionary is any of the dictionaries edited by Noah Webster in the early nineteenth century, and numerous related or unrelated dictionaries that have adopted the Webster's name. "Webster's" has become a genericized trademark in the U.S. for dictionaries of the English language, and is widely used in English dictionary titles. Merriam-Webster is the corporate heir to Noah Webster's original works, which are in the public domain.

    Noah Webster, the author of the readers and spelling books which dominated the American market at the time, spent decades of research in compiling his dictionaries. His first dictionary, A Compendious Dictionary of the English Language, appeared in 1806. In it, he popularized features which would become a hallmark of American English spelling and included technical terms from the arts and sciences rather than confining his dictionary to literary words. Webster was a proponent of English spelling

    Noah Webster's assistant, and later chief competitor, Joseph Emerson Worcester, and Webster's son-in-law Chauncey A. Goodrich, published an abridgment of Noah Webster's 1828 American Dictionary of the English Language in 1829, with the same number of words and Webster's full definitions, but with truncated literary references and expanded etymology. Although it was more successful financially than the original 1828 edition and was reprinted many times, Noah Webster was critical of it. Worcester

    After about a decade of preparation, G. & C. Merriam issued the entirely new Webster's Third New International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged in September 1961. Although it was an unprecedented masterwork of scholarship, it was met with considerable criticism for its descriptive approach. The dictionary's treatment of "ain't" was subject to particular scorn, since it seemed to overrule the near-unanimous denunciation of that word by English teachers.

    Merriam-Webster introduced its Collegiate Dictionary in 1898 and the series is now in its eleventh edition. Following the publication of Webster's International in 1890, two Collegiate editions were issued as abridgments of each of their Unabridged editions. With the ninth edition, the Collegiate adopted changes which distinguish it as a separate entity rather than merely an abridgment of the "Third New International." Some proper names were returned to the word list, including names of Knights

    Since the late 19th century, dictionaries bearing the name Webster's have been published by companies other than Merriam-Webster. Some of these were unauthorized reprints of Noah Webster's work; some were revisions of his work. One such revision was Webster's Imperial Dictionary, based on John Ogilvie's The Imperial Dictionary of the English Language, itself an expansion of Noah Webster's American Dictionary. Following legal action by Merriam, successive US courts ruled by 1908 that Webster's en

  6. People also ask

    What does Wikipedia stand for in English Dictionary?

    Is there such a thing as an online dictionary?

    Where does the term WikiWikiWeb come from?

    What makes the Oxford English Dictionary a historical dictionary?

  7. Online Etymology Dictionary - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Etymonline
    • Overview
    • Description
    • Reviews and reputation

    The Online Etymology Dictionary is a free online dictionary, written and compiled by Douglas Harper that describes the origins of English-language words.

    Douglas Harper, an American Civil War historian and copy editor for LNP Media Group, compiled the etymology dictionary to record the history and evolution of more than 50,000 words, including slang and technical terms. The core body of its etymology information stems from The Barnhart Dictionary of Etymology by Robert Barnhart, Ernest Klein's Comprehensive Etymology Dictionary of the English Language, The Middle English Compendium, The Oxford English Dictionary, and the 1889-1902 Century Diction

    The Online Etymology Dictionary has been referenced by Oxford University's "Arts and Humanities Community Resource" catalog as "an excellent tool for those seeking the origins of words" and cited in the Chicago Tribune as one of the "best resources for finding just the right word". It is cited in academic work as a useful, though not definitive, reference for etymology. In addition, it has been used as a data source for quantitative scholarly research.

    • English
    • Private
  8. Wikipedia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Wikipedia

    Wikipedia (/ ˌ w ɪ k ɪ ˈ p iː d i ə / wik-ih-PEE-dee-ə or / ˌ w ɪ k i-/ wik-ee-) is a free content, multilingual online encyclopedia written and maintained by a community of volunteer contributors through a model of open collaboration, using a wiki-based editing system.

  9. Fictionary - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Fictionary

    Fictionary, also known as The Dictionary Game or simply Dictionary, is a word game in which players guess the definition of an obscure word. Each round consists of one player selecting and announcing a word from the dictionary, and other players composing a fake definition for it.

  10. Wikipedia - definition of Wikipedia by The Free Dictionary

    www.thefreedictionary.com › Wikipedia

    Wikipedia synonyms, Wikipedia pronunciation, Wikipedia translation, English dictionary definition of Wikipedia. a Web site or database developed by a community of users, allowing any user to add and edit content Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree...

  11. People also search for