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  1. Dictionary - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dictionary

    2 days ago · A dictionary is a listing of words in one or more specific languages, often arranged alphabetically (or by radical and stroke for ideographic languages), which may include information on definitions, usage, etymologies, pronunciations, translation, etc. or a book of words in one language with their equivalents in another, sometimes known as a lexicon.

  2. Oxford English Dictionary - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxford_English_Dictionary

    6 days ago · The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is the principal historical dictionary of the English language, published by Oxford University Press (OUP). It traces the historical development of the English language, providing a comprehensive resource to scholars and academic researchers, as well as describing usage in its many variations throughout the world.

    • United Kingdom
    • 1884–1928 (first edition), 1989 (second edition), Third edition in preparation
  3. Webster's Dictionary - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Webster's_Dictionary

    5 days ago · Noah Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language. Noah Webster (1758–1843), the author of the readers and spelling books which dominated the American market at the time, spent decades of research in compiling his dictionaries. His first dictionary, A Compendious Dictionary of the English Language, appeared in 1806.

  4. Oxford Dictionary of English - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxford_Dictionary_of_English

    4 days ago · The Oxford Dictionary of English (ODE) is a single-volume English dictionary published by Oxford University Press, first published in 1998 as The New Oxford Dictionary of English (NODE). The word "new" was dropped from the title with the Second Edition in 2003.

    • Judy Pearsall, Patrick Hanks, Catherine Soanes, Angus Stevenson
    • Dictionary
    • 2010
    • 2112
  5. dictionary - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org/wiki/dictionary
    • Etymology
    • Pronunciation
    • Noun
    • Verb

    Borrowed from Medieval Latin dictionarium, from Latin dictionarius, from dictio (“speaking”), from dictus, perfect past participle of dīcō (“speak”) + -arium (“room, place”).

    (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈdɪkʃ(ə)n(ə)ɹi/
    (General American, Canada) enPR: dĭk'shə-nĕr-ē, IPA(key): /ˈdɪkʃənɛɹi/
    Hyphenation: dic‧tion‧ary
    Rhymes: -ɪkʃənɛəɹi

    dictionary (plural dictionaries) 1. A reference work with a list of words from one or more languages, normally ordered alphabetically, explaining each word's meaning, and sometimes containing information on its etymology, pronunciation, usage, translations, and other data. 1.1. 1988, Andrew Radford, chapter 7, in Transformational grammar: a first course, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, page 339: 1.1.1. But what other kind(s) of syntactic information should be included in Lexical Entries? Traditional dictionaries such as Hornby's (1974) Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English include not only categorial information in their entries, but also information about the range of Complementswhich a given item permits (this information is represented by the use of a number/letter code). 1.1. Synonym: wordbook 2. (preceded by the) A synchronic dictionary of a standardised language held to only contain words that are properly part of the language. 2.1. 1930, Norman Li...

    dictionary (third-person singular simple present dictionaries, present participle dictionarying, simple past and past participle dictionaried) 1. (transitive)To look up in a dictionary. 2. (transitive) To add to a dictionary. 2.1. 1866, William Henry Ward, The international day, night, and fog signal telegraph, page 12: 2.1.1. By a reference to the following dictionariedabbreviations, the simplicity and harmony of each sentence will be manifestly apparent; although it does not embrace everything, and could not, as it would be far too voluminous for general use. 2.2. 2001, The Michigan Alumnus, page 25: 2.2.1. Should I use a word that a lot of people use but isn't in the dictionary? Uncle Phil would rather get a root canal than say he was scrapbooking, because the word isn't dictionaried. 3. (intransitive, rare) To compile a dictionary. 3.1. 1864, Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, volume 96, page 334: 3.1.1. They [dictionary-makers] may have had their romance at home — may have been cr...

  6. Wikipedia - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Wikipedia
    • English
    • Danish
    • Italian
    • Japanese
    • Polish

    Alternative forms

    1. wikipedia(when used as a common noun)

    Etymology

    Blend of wiki +‎ encyclopedia, coined by Larry Sanger.

    Pronunciation

    1. (UK) IPA(key): /ˌwɪkɪˈpiːdɪə/ 2. (US) enPR: wĭ'kēpēʹdēə, wĭ'kəpēʹdēə, IPA(key): /ˌwɪkiˈpiːdi.ə/, /ˌwɪkəˈpiːdi.ə/ 3. Rhymes: -iːdiə

    Etymology

    Borrowed from English Wikipedia.

    Proper noun

    Wikipedia (genitive Wikipedias) 1. Wikipedia

    Noun

    Wikipedia c (singular definite Wikipediaen, plural indefinite Wikipediaer) 1. Wikipedia(a version of the encyclopedia project)

    Etymology

    Borrowed from English Wikipedia, blend of Hawaiian wiki + English encyclopedia. Surface analysis: Hawaiian wiki (“speedy”) + Italian -pedia (“-pedia”).

    Pronunciation

    1. (standard) IPA(key): /wi.kiˈpe.dia/ 2. (alternative pronunciations) IPA(key): /vi.kiˈpe.dia/, /wi.kiˈpi.dia/, /vi.kiˈpi.dia/ 3. Hyphenation: wi‧ki‧pé‧dia

    Proper noun

    Wikipedia f 1. Wikipedia 1.1. la Wikipedia in lingua italiana/inglese/spagnola ― the Wikipediain Italian/English/Spanish language

    Romanization

    Wikipedia 1. Rōmaji transcription of ウィキペディア

    Etymology

    From English Wikipedia.

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /vʲi.kʲiˈpɛd.ja/

    Proper noun

    Wikipedia f 1. (Internet) Wikipedia

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  8. English Wikipedia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_Wikipedia

    2 days ago · The English Wikipedia is the English-language edition of the free online encyclopedia Wikipedia.Founded on 15 January 2001, it is the first edition of Wikipedia and, as of November 2020, has the most articles of any edition.

  9. English - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org/wiki/English
    • Etymology
    • Pronunciation
    • Adjective
    • Noun
    • Proper Noun
    • Verb
    • See Also
    • Further Reading

    From Middle English Englisch, English, Inglis, from Old English Englisċ (“of the Angles; English”), from Engle (“the Angles”), a Germanic tribe +‎ -isċ; equal to Angle +‎ -ish. Compare Dutch Engels, Danish engelsk, Old French Englesche (whence French anglais), German englisch, Spanish inglés, ultimately derived from Proto-Indo-European *h₂enǵʰ- (“narrow”) (compare Sanskrit अंहु (áṃhu, “narrow”), अंहस् (áṃhas, “anxiety, sin”), Latin angustus (“narrow”), Old Church Slavonic ѫзъкъ (ǫzŭkŭ, “narro...

    1. (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɪŋɡlɪʃ/, (non-standard) /ˈɪŋɡəlɪʃ/ 2. (US) IPA(key): /ˈɪŋɡlɪʃ/, (also) /ˈɪŋlɪʃ/ 3. Hyphenation: Eng‧lish

    English (comparative more English, superlative most English) 1. Of or pertaining to England. 2. English-language; of or pertaining to the language, descended from Anglo-Saxon, which developed in England. 3. Of or pertaining to the people of England (to Englishmen and Englishwomen).quotations ▼ 1. 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 2, in The Celebrity: 4. Of or pertaining to the avoirdupois system of measure. 5. (Amish) Non-Amish, so named for speaking English rather than a variety of German.

    English (countable and uncountable, plural English or Englishes) 1. (plural) The people of England; Englishmen and Englishwomen. 2. (Amish, plural) The non-Amish; non-Amish people. 3. (uncountable) Ability to employ the English language correctly or idiomatically. 4. The English-language term or expression for something. 5. (uncountable) Specific language or wording in English; English text or statements in speech, whether in translation or otherwise. 6. (printing, dated) A size of type betwe...

    English 1. The language originating in England but now spoken in all parts of the British Isles, the Commonwealth of Nations, North America, and other parts of the world. 2. A variety, dialect, or idiolect of spoken and or written English.quotations ▼ 1. 2003, Amy Tan, \\"Mother Tongue\\", in The Opposite of Fate: Memories of a Writing Life, page 278 3. English language, literature, composition as a subject of study 4. An English surname​ originally denoting a non-Celtic or non-Danish person in B...

    English (third-person singular simple present Englishes, present participle Englishing, simple past and past participle Englished) 1. (transitive, archaic) To translate, adapt or render into English.quotations ▼ 1. 1621, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed by Iohn Lichfield and Iames Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 216894069; The Anatomy of Melancholy: […], 2nd corrected and augmented edition, Oxford: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short...

    1. English (disambiguation) on the English Wikipedia. English Wikipedia 2. English language on Wikipedia.Wikipedia 3. English literature on Wikipedia.Wikipedia 4. English studies on Wikipedia.Wikipedia 5. English people on Wikipedia.Wikipedia 1. Wiktionary's coverage of English terms

    1. English at OneLook Dictionary Search 2. ISO 639-1 code en, ISO 639-3 code eng 3. Ethnologue entry for English, en

  10. Wiki definition and meaning | Collins English Dictionary

    www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/wiki

    5 days ago · Wiki definition: A wiki is a website that allows anyone visiting it to change or add to the material in... | Meaning, pronunciation, translations and examples

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