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  1. List of dialects of English - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_dialects_of_the...

    Overview. Dialects can be defined as "sub-forms of languages which are, in general, mutually comprehensible." English speakers from different countries and regions use a variety of different accents (systems of pronunciation) as well as various localised words and grammatical constructions; many different dialects can be identified based on these factors.

  2. Dialects of English - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dialects_of_English

    American English or U.S. English is the dialect (or rather, a variety of dialects) of English language spoken in the United States. It is different in some respects from other variations of English, such as British English. Historically, many types of American English can be traced back to old local dialects of England.

  3. Wikipedia:Userboxes/Language/English/Dialects - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/.../Language/English/Dialects

    This gallery includes userbox templates about dialects of the English language.You may place any of these userboxes on your user page.Some of these templates have multiple options, so visit the template for further information.

  4. Dialect - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dialect

    Examples of a nonstandard English dialect are Southern American English, Western Australian English, New York English, New England English, Mid-Atlantic American or Philadelphia / Baltimore English, Scouse, Brummie, Cockney, and Tyke. The Dialect Test was designed by Joseph Wright to compare different English dialects with each other.

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  6. Category:Dialects of English - Simple English Wikipedia, the ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Dialects_of...

    Pages in category "Dialects of English" The following 22 pages are in this category, out of 22 total.

  7. English is definitely a language, but it once was Anglo-Saxon, a dialect of Old Saxon. Chinese is called a language, but has hundreds of dialects, such as Mandarin, Cantonese, Wu, and Hokkien. Many of them are not mutually intelligible. In past times, travel was difficult and so dialects developed in quite small regions.

  8. American English - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_English

    American English or United States English is the dialect of the English language spoken in the United States of America. It is different in some ways from other types of English, such as British English. Many types of American English came from local dialects in England.

  9. List of dialects of English — Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org/en/List_of_dialects_of_English
    • Creoles
    • Constructed
    • Manual Encodings
    • Code-Switching
    • See Also
    • Further Reading
    • External Links

    Pid­gins and cre­oles exist which are based on, or in­cor­po­rate, Eng­lish, in­clud­ing Chi­nook Jar­gon (a mostly ex­tinct trade lan­guage), Amer­i­can In­dian Pid­gin Eng­lish, and Mang­lish(Malaysian Eng­lish-Malay-Chi­nese-Tamil). A pan-Asian Eng­lish vari­a­tion called Glob­alese has been described.

    Sev­eral con­structed lan­guages exist based on Eng­lish, which have never been adopted as a ver­nac­u­lar. Lan­guage schol­ars have stated that con­structed lan­guages are "no longer of prac­ti­cal use" with Eng­lish as a de facto global lan­guage. 1. Basic English 2. E-Prime 3. European English 4. Globish (Gogate) 5. Globish (Nerriere) 6. Newspeak 7. Special English 8. Simplified English

    The fol­low­ing are port­man­teaus de­vised to de­scribe cer­tain local va­ri­eties of Eng­lish and other lin­guis­tic phe­nom­ena in­volv­ing Eng­lish. Al­though sim­i­larly named, they are ac­tu­ally quite dif­fer­ent in na­ture, with some being gen­uine mixed lan­guages, some being in­stances of heavy code-switch­ing be­tween Eng­lish and an­other lan­guage, some being gen­uine local di­alects of Eng­lish used by first-lan­guage Eng­lish speak­ers, and some being non-na­tive pro­nun­ci­a­tions of Eng­lish. A few port­man­teaus (such as Greek­lish and Fin­gilish) are translit­er­a­tionmeth­ods rather than any kind of spo­ken vari­ant of Eng­lish. 1. Anglish(English stressing words of Germanic origin) 2. Arabish(Arabic English, mostly chat romanization) 3. Army creole (military dialect of acronyms and profanity) 4. Benglish(Bengali English) 5. Bislish(Bisaya English) 6. Chinglish(Chinese English) 7. Czenglish(Czech English) 8. Danglish(Danish English) 9. Dunglish(Dutch English) 10....

    Hickey, Raymond (ed.) (2004). Legacies of Colonial English. Studies in Transported Dialects. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0521175074.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
    Hickey, Raymond (ed.) (2010). Varieties of English in Writing. The Written Word as Linguistic Evidence. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. ISBN 9789027249012.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
    Hickey, Raymond (2014). A Dictionary of Varieties of English. Malden, MA: Wiley- Blackwell. ISBN 978-0-470-65641-9.
    "English Language§Varieties of English", Encyclopædia Britannica(Fifth ed.), Vol. 6 Earth–Everglades, pp. 883–886, 1974
  10. English language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_language

    English is an Indo-European language and belongs to the West Germanic group of the Germanic languages. Old English originated from a Germanic tribal and linguistic continuum along the Frisian North Sea coast, whose languages gradually evolved into the Anglic languages in the British Isles, and into the Frisian languages and Low German/Low Saxon on the continent.

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