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  1. Ford Motor Company (commonly known as Ford) is an American multinational automobile manufacturer headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, United States. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand, and luxury cars under its Lincoln luxury brand.

  2. In 1988 Ford Motor Company sold 80% of Ford-New Holland Inc. to Fiat, and in 1991 Fiat acquired the remaining 20%, with the agreement to stop using the Ford brand by 2000. By 1999, Fiat had discontinued the use of both its own and the Ford name, and united them both under the New Holland brand.

  3. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › FordFord - Wikipedia

    • Ford Motor Company
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    • See Also
    The Ford (painting), a 1644 painting by Claude Lorrain
    Ford, a religious figure in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World
    Ford and Mistress Ford, characters in William Shakespeare's The Merry Wives of Windsor
    Ford Cruller, a character in Psychonauts

    Antarctica

    1. Ford Ice Piedmont 2. Ford Island (Windmill Islands) 3. Ford Massif 4. Ford Nunataks 5. Ford Peak 6. Ford Ranges 7. Ford Rock 8. Ford Spur

    United Kingdom

    1. Ford, Argyll 2. Ford, Buckinghamshire 3. Ford, Derbyshire 4. Ford, Devon, in the parish of Holbeton 5. Ford, Chivelstone, a locationin Devon 6. Ford, Plymouth, the location of Ford (Devon) railway station 7. Ford, East Devon, a locationin Devon 8. Ford, Torridge, a locationin Devon 9. Ford, Gloucestershire 10. Ford, Herefordshire, a location 11. Ford, Merseyside 11.1. Ford (ward) 11.2. Ford railway station (Merseyside) 12. Ford, Northumberland 13. Ford, Pembrokeshire 14. Ford, Shropshire 1...

    United States

    1. Ford, Georgia 2. Ford, Kansas 3. Ford, Kentucky 4. Ford, Virginia 5. Ford, Washington 6. Ford, Wisconsin 7. Ford Block, a historic commercial building in Oneonta, Otsego County, New York 8. Ford Center (Evansville), an indoor arena in Evansville, Indiana 9. Ford Field, a stadium in Detroit, Michigan 10. Ford Hospital, active in the 1920s, Omaha, Nebraska 11. Ford Island, Hawaii

    All pages with titles beginning with Ford
    All pages with titles containing Ford
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    The first-generation F-Series pickup (known as the Ford Bonus-Built) was introduced in 1948 as a replacement for the previous car-based pickup line introduced in 1942. The F-Series was sold in eight different weight ratings, with pickup, panel truck, cab-over engine (COE), conventional truck, and school-bus chassis body styles.

    For the 1953 model year, Ford introduced a second generation of the F-Series trucks. Increased dimensions, improved engines, and an updated chassis were features of the second generation. In another change, the model nomenclature of the F-Series was expanded to three numbers; this remains in use in the present day. The half-ton F-1 became the F-100 (partially influenced by the North American F-100 Super Sabre)[citation needed]; the F-2 and F-3 were combined into the 3⁄4-ton F-250, while the F-4 became the one-ton F-350. Conventional F-Series trucks were F-500 to F-900; COE chassis were renamed C-Series trucks. While the cabs, doors, radiator support, inner fenders, and hoods are the same from 1953 to 1956 F-100 and F-250s (the fenders varied on F-250, F-350, and F-500, and long boxes were only available on the F-250), in 1956, the cab underwent a major revision. Centered around a wraparound windshield, the cab was given new doors, a redesigned dashboard, and an (optional) panoramic...

    Introduced in 1957, the third-generation F-series was a significant modernization and redesign. Front fenders became integrated into the body, and the new Styleside bed continued the smooth lines to the rear of the pickup. The cab-over F-Series was discontinued, having been replaced by the tilt-cab C-Series. In 1959, Ford began in-house production of four-wheel drive pickups.

    Ford introduced a dramatically new style of pickup in 1961 with the fourth-generation F-Series. Longer and lower than its predecessors, these trucks had increased dimensions and new engine and gearbox choices. Additionally, the 1961–1963 models offered an optional unibody design with the cab and bed integrated. The traditional separate cab/bed was offered concurrently. The unibody proved unpopular, and Ford discontinued the option after the 1963 model year. In 1965, the F-Series was given a significant midcycle redesign. A completely new platform, including the "Twin I-Beam" front suspension, was introduced, and continued to be used until 1996 on the F-150 and until 2016 on the F-250/350 4x2. Additionally, the Ranger name made its first appearance in 1965 on a Ford pickup; previously, the Ranger denoted a base model of the Edsel, but starting in 1965, it was used to denote a high-level styling package for F-Series pickups.

    Introduced in 1967, the fifth-generation F-series pickup was built on the same platform as the 1965 revision of the fourth generation. Dimensions and greenhouse glass were increased, engine options were expanded, and plusher trim levels became available during the fifth generation's production run. Suspension components from all 1969 F-Series models are completely interchangeable.

    The sixth-generation F-series was introduced in 1973. This version of the F-series continued to be built on the 1965 fourth-generation's revised platform, but with significant modernization and refinements, including front disc brakes, increased cabin dimensions, full double-wall bed construction, and increased use of galvanized steel. The FE engine series was discontinued in 1976 after a nearly 20-year run, replaced by the more modern 335 and 385 series engines. In 1975, the F-150 was introduced in between the F-100 and the F-250 to avoid certain emission control restrictions. For 1978, square headlights replaced the previous models' round ones on higher trim package models, such as Lariat and Ranger, and in 1979 became standard equipment. Also for 1978, the Ford Bronco was redesigned into a variant of the F-series pickup; 1979 was the last year that the 460 engine was available in a half-ton truck.

    The seventh-generation F-Series was introduced for 1980, marking the first ground-up redesign of the model line since 1965. Alongside an all-new chassis, the pickup trucks received a completely new body. While distinguished by straighter body lines, the aerodynamics of the exterior were optimized to improve fuel economy. Sharing their cab structure with F-Series pickup trucks, medium-duty trucks (F-600 through F-800) underwent their first redesign since 1967. The powertrain line of this generation underwent multiple revisions through its production. At its launch, the engine line was largely carried over from 1979. While the 7.5 L V8 was dropped entirely, a 4.2 L V8 was introduced as the smallest V8 engine. For 1982, a 3.8 L V6 became the standard engine for the F-100. For 1983, to improve the fuel efficiency of the model line, the M-Series engines (the 5.8 L 351M and 6.6 L 400 V8s) were dropped; the latter was replaced by the return of the 7.5 L V8. In response to low demand and po...

    The eighth-generation F-Series was introduced for 1987 as a major revision of the 1980–1986 generation. While the cab was carried over, many body panels were revised, including a completely new front fascia; the interior also underwent a redesign. The long-running Flareside bed design was retired, with all examples produced with Styleside beds. Following the 1986 transition of the 5.0 L V8 to fuel injection, the 4.9 L I6 followed suit for 1987, with the 5.8 L and 7.5 L engines doing so for 1988; the F-Series became the first American pickup truck model line sold without carbureted engines. The same year, the 6.9 L diesel V8 was increased in size to 7.3 L. Following the discontinuation of the three-speed manual, a five-speed manual became standard equipment (a four-speed remained a special-order option until 1989). For 1989, an E4ODfour-speed automatic (overdrive version of the C6 heavy-duty three-speed) was introduced. Slotted between the F-350 and F-600, the F-Super Duty was introd...

    The ninth-generation F-Series was introduced for 1992 as the second redesign of the 1980 F-Series architecture. Adapting design elements from the newly introduced Explorer and redesigned E-Series and Ranger, the F-Series received a slightly lower hoodline, rounding the front fenders, bumper, and grille. Coinciding with a redesign of the interior, the F-Series received a driver-side airbag. After a six-year hiatus, the FlareSide bed made its return, becoming a submodel of the F-150. To appeal to younger buyers, the bodywork of the FlareSide bed was modernized, adapting the fenders of a dual rear-wheel F-350 to a single rear-wheel chassis. To commemorate the 75th anniversary of the first Ford factory-produced truck (the 1917 Ford Model TT), Ford offered a 75th-anniversary package on its 1992 F-series, consisting of a stripe package, an argent-colored step bumper, and special 75th-anniversary logos. In response to the Chevrolet 454SS pickup truck, Ford introduced the SVT Lightning, pow...

    For the 1997 model year, Ford made a substantial change to the F-Series range of trucks, splitting its pickup line into two vehicle families. From the 1970s to the 1990s, pickup trucks had transitioned in usage. Alongside vehicles designed exclusively for work use, the market segment saw a major increase in demand for dual-purpose vehicles for both work and personal use, effectively serving as a second car. To further expand its growing market share, Ford sought to develop vehicles for both types of buyers, repackaging the F-150 in a more contemporary design (as a larger version of the Ranger) while retaining the heavier-duty F-250 and F-350 for customers interested in a work-use vehicle. The tenth-generation F-Series was introduced in January 1996 as a 1997 model. Initially released solely as the F-150, a higher-GVWR F-250 was released in 1997. The model line was marketed alongside its predecessor, pared down to the F-250HD and F-350; for 1999, these were replaced by the Super Duty...

    • Ford Lobo (Mexico, 1992–present)
    • Full-size pickup truck
    • 1948–present
    • Ford
  4. Ford Cargo. The Ford C series is a range of trucks that was assembled by Ford between 1957 and 1990. The first cab-over engine (COE) truck produced with a tilting cab by Ford, the C-series replaced the C-series COE variant of the F-series, produced since 1948. Produced as both a straight/rigid truck and a tractor, a wide range of versions of C ...

    • Medium-duty truck
    • Cab over
    • 1957-1990
    • Ford
  5. The Ford Explorer is a range of SUVs manufactured by Ford Motor Company since the 1991 model year. The first four-door SUV produced by Ford, the Explorer was introduced as a replacement for the two-door Bronco II.

    • 1990–present
    • Ford
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