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  1. Biography Parents and upbringing (1898–1908) William James Sidis was born to Jewish emigrants from Ukraine, [better source needed] on April 1, 1898, in New York City.His father, Boris Sidis, PhD, M.D., had emigrated in 1887 to escape political and anti-semitic persecution.

    • Biography
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    • Sidis in Educational Discussions
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    [edit] Parents and upbringing

    William James Sidis was born to Russian-Jewish immigrants on April 1, 1898 in New York City. His father, Boris Sidis, Ph.D., M.D., had emigrated in 1887 to escape political persecution. His mother, Sarah Mandelbaum Sidis, M.D., and her family had fled the pogroms about 1889. Sarah attended Boston University and graduated from its School of Medicine in 1897.[2] William was named after his godfather, Boris's friend and colleague, the American philosopherWilliam James. Boris earned his degrees a...

    [edit] Harvard and college life

    Although the University had previously refused to let his father enroll him at age nine because he was still a child, Sidis set a record in 1909 by becoming the youngest person to enroll at Harvard College. He was 11 years old, and entered Harvard as part of a program to enroll gifted students early. The experimental group included mathematician Norbert Wiener, Richard Buckminster Fuller, and composer Roger Sessions. In early 1910, his mastery of higher mathematics was such that he lectured t...

    [edit] Teaching and further education

    After a group of Harvard students threatened physical harm, his parents secured him a job at the William Marsh Rice Institute for the Advancement of Letters, Science, and Art (now Rice University) in Houston, Texas as a mathematics teaching assistant. He arrived at Rice in December 1915 at the age of 17. He was a Graduate Fellow working toward his doctorate. Sidis taught three classes: Euclidean geometry, non-Euclidean geometry, and trigonometry (he wrote a textbook for the Euclidean geometry...

    Aside from mathematics, subjects on which Sidis wrote or lectured included cosmology, psychology, and Native American history. Some of his ideas concerned cosmological reversibility,[18]"social continuity," [19] and individual rights in the United States.[10] In The Animate and the Inanimate (1925), Sidis predicted the existence of regions of space where the second law of thermodynamics operated in reverse to the temporal direction that we experience in our local area. Everything outside of what we would today call a galaxy would be such a region. Sidis claimed that the matter in this region would not generate light. (These dark areas of the universe are not properly dark matter or black holes as they are used in contemporary cosmology.) This work on cosmology, based on his theory of reversibility of the second law of thermodynamics was the only book published under his name.[18] Sidis' The Tribes and the States (ca. 1935) employs the pseudonym "John W. Shattuck," giving a 100,000-y...

    The debate about Sidis' manner of upbringing occurred within a larger discourse about the best way to educate children. Newspapers criticized the child-rearing methods of Boris Sidis. Most educators of the day believed that schools should expose children to common experiences to create good citizens, and most psychologists thought that intelligence was hereditary — a position that precluded early childhood education at home.[25] The difficulties that Sidis and other highly gifted young students encountered in dealing with the social structure of a university setting helped shape opinion against allowing them to rapidly advance through higher education. The debate over gifted education continues today, and Sidis remains a topic of discussion. Cast in modern standards, scholars usually classify Sidis as a profoundly gifted individual, and some critics use Sidis as the most vivid example of how gifted youth do not always achieve corresponding success as adults — in either material or c...

    LaMay, Craig L. (2003). Journalism and the Debate Over Privacy. LEA's Communication Series. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.. ISBN 9780805846263.
    Wallace, Amy (1986). The prodigy: a biography of William James Sidis, America's greatest child prodigy. New York: E.P. Dutton & Co.. ISBN 0-525-24404-2.
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    • Biography
    • Publications and Subjects of Research
    • Legacy
    • References
    • External Links

    Parents and upbringing

    William James Sidis was born to Jew­ish em­i­grants from Ukraine, on April 1, 1898, in New York City. His fa­ther, Boris Sidis, PhD, M.D., had em­i­grated in 1887 to es­cape po­lit­i­cal persecution. His mother, Sarah (Man­del­baum) Sidis, M.D., and her fam­ily had fled the pogroms in the late 1880s. Sarah at­tended Boston Uni­ver­sity and grad­u­ated from its School of Med­i­cinein 1897. William was named after his god­fa­ther, Boris' friend and col­league, the Amer­i­can philoso­pher Willia...

    Harvard University and college life

    Al­though the Uni­ver­sity had pre­vi­ously re­fused to let his fa­ther en­roll him at age 9 be­cause he was still a child, Sidis set a record in 1909 by be­com­ing the youngest per­son to en­roll at Har­vard Uni­ver­sity. In early 1910, Sidis' mas­tery of higher math­e­mat­ics was such that he lec­tured the Har­vard Math­e­mat­i­cal Club on four-di­men­sional bod­ies. No­table child prodigy, cy­ber­net­ics pi­o­neer Nor­bert Wiener, who also at­tended Har­vard at the time and knew Sidis late...

    Teaching and further education

    After a group of Har­vard stu­dents threat­ened Sidis phys­i­cally, his par­ents se­cured him a job at the William Marsh Rice In­sti­tute for the Ad­vance­ment of Let­ters, Sci­ence, and Art (now Rice Uni­ver­sity) in Hous­ton, Texas, as a math­e­mat­ics teach­ing as­sis­tant. He ar­rived at Rice in De­cem­ber 1915 at the age of 17. He was a grad­u­ate fel­low work­ing to­ward his doc­tor­ate. Sidis taught three classes: Eu­clid­ean geom­e­try, non-Eu­clid­ean geom­e­try, and fresh­man math (...

    From writ­ings on cos­mol­ogy, to writ­ings on Amer­i­can In­dian his­tory, to Notes on the Col­lec­tion of Transfers, and sev­eral pur­ported lost texts on an­thro­pol­ogy, philol­ogy, and trans­porta­tion sys­tems, Sidis cov­ered a broad range of sub­jects. Some of his ideas con­cerned cos­mo­log­i­cal re­versibil­ityand "so­cial continuity". In The An­i­mate and the Inanimate (1925), Sidis pre­dicted the ex­is­tence of re­gions of space where the sec­ond law of ther­mo­dy­nam­ics op­er­ated in re­verse to the tem­po­ral di­rec­tion that we ex­pe­ri­ence in our local area. Every­thing out­side of what we would today call a galaxy would be such a re­gion. Sidis claimed that the mat­ter in this re­gion would not gen­er­ate light. Sidis's The Tribes and the States (ca. 1935) em­ploys the pseu­do­nym "John W. Shat­tuck", pur­port­ing to give a 100,000-year his­tory of the Set­tle­ment of the Amer­i­cas, from pre­his­toric times to 1828.In this text, he sug­gests that "there were red m...

    After his death, He­lena Sidis claimed that her brother had an IQ re­ported in Abra­ham Sper­ling's 1946 book Psy­chol­ogy for the Millions as "the very high­est that had ever been obtained", but later au­thors found that some of his bi­og­ra­phers, such as Amy Wal­lace, ex­ag­ger­ated how high his IQ ac­tu­ally was and ex­actly what Sper­ling had claimed.Sper­ling ac­tu­ally wrote: It has been ac­knowl­edged that He­lena and William's mother Sarah had de­vel­oped a rep­u­ta­tion of ex­ag­ger­ated claims about the Sidis family. He­lena had also falsely claimed that the Civil Ser­vice exam William took in 1933 was an IQ test and that his rank­ing was an IQ score of 254. It is spec­u­lated that the num­ber "254" was ac­tu­ally William's place­ment on the list after he passed the Civil Ser­vice exam, as he stated in a let­ter sent to his family. He­lena also claimed that "Billy knew all the lan­guages in the world, while my fa­ther only knew twenty-seven. I won­der if there were any Bi...

    Sources

    1. Wallace, Amy (1986). The Prodigy: a Biography of William James Sidis, America's Greatest Child Prodigy. New York: E.P. Dutton & Co. ISBN 0-525-24404-2.

    Article about William James Sidis at The Straight Dope
  3. Biography Parents and upbringing (1898–1909) William James Sidis was born to Jewish Ukrainian immigrants on April 1, 1898, in New York City. His father Boris Sidis, Ph.D., M.D., had emigrated in 1887 to escape political persecution. His mother Sarah Mandelbaum Sidis, M.D., and her family had fled the pogroms in 1889.

  4. Jul 14, 2021 · William James Sidis, better known by the Family name William James Sidis, was a popular child prodigy. Know his, Estimated Net Worth, Age, Biography Wikipedia Wiki

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