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  1. Yellow fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow_fever

    3 days ago · For the Yellow Plague of Rhos in medieval Wales, see Maelgwn Gwynedd. Yellow fever is a viral disease of typically short duration. In most cases, symptoms include fever, chills, loss of appetite, nausea, muscle pains particularly in the back, and headaches. Symptoms typically improve within five days.

    • Aedes Aegypti

      Aedes aegypti, the yellow fever mosquito, is a mosquito that...

  2. Yellow fever. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to navigation Jump to search. Yellow fever is an acute viral haemorrhagic disease transmitted by infected mosquitoes. The illness can cause bleeding problems. It is called yellow because it makes the skin and the eyes yellow in colour, like it does with jaundice .

  3. History of yellow fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_yellow_fever

    May 18, 2020 · The evolutionary origins of yellow fever most likely lie in Africa. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the virus originated from East or Central Africa, with transmission between primates and humans, and spread from there to West Africa. The virus as well as the vector Aedes aegypti, a mosquito species, were probably brought to the western hemisphere and the Americas by slave trade ships from Africa after the first European exploration in 1492. The first outbreaks of disease that were probably

  4. Yellow fever vaccine - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow_fever_vaccine

    5 days ago · The yellow fever 17D vaccine is considered safe, with over 500 million doses given and very few documented cases of vaccine associated illness (62 confirmed cases and 35 deaths as of January 2019). In no case of vaccine-related illness has there been evidence of the virus reverting to a virulent phenotype.

    • Subcutaneous injection
    • YF-Vax, Stamaril
    • Yellow fever
    • AU: B2, US: N (Not classified yet)
  5. Yellow - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow

    3 days ago · The yellow-fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti) is a mosquito so named because it transmits dengue fever and yellow fever, the mosquito-borne viruses. Yellowjackets are black-and-yellow wasps of the genus Vespula or Dolichovespula (though some can be black-and-white, the most notable of these being the bald-faced hornet , Dolichovespula maculata ).

    • (60°, 100%, 100%)
    • 575–585 nm
  6. Immunity (medical) - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immunity_(medical)

    Viruses were confirmed as human pathogens in 1901, with the discovery of the yellow fever virus by Walter Reed. [5] Immunology made a great advance towards the end of the 19th century, through rapid developments, in the study of humoral immunity ( antibodies ) and cellular immunity ( T cells and dendritic cells ).

  7. 1793 Philadelphia yellow fever epidemic - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow_Fever_Epidemic_of_1793

    2 days ago · From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Redirected from Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793) Jump to navigation Jump to search. The Arch Street wharf, where the first cluster of cases was identified. During the 1793 yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia, 3,000 or more people were listed in the official register of deaths between August 1 and November 9.

  8. Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

    2 days ago · the free encyclopedia that anyone can edit. 5,997,619 articles in English. From today's featured article. Julia Voth in costume as Jill Valentine. Jill Valentine is a fictional character in Resident Evil, a survival horror video game series created by the Japanese company Capcom. Appearing in the original Resident Evil (1996), she featured as ...

  9. Q fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Q_fever

    May 17, 2020 · Retinal vasculitis is a rare manifestation of Q fever. The chronic form of Q fever is virtually identical to endocarditis (i.e. inflammation of the inner lining of the heart), which can occur months or decades following the infection. It is usually fatal if untreated.