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  1. Diseases and epidemics of the 19th century - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diseases_and_epidemics_of...

    Yellow fever accounted for the largest number of the 19th-century's individual epidemic outbreaks, and most of the recorded serious outbreaks of yellow fever occurred in the 19th century. It is most prevalent in tropical-like climates, but the United States was not exempted from the fever. [37]

  2. Pandemic - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pandemic

    Yellow fever has been a source of several devastating epidemics. Cities as far north as New York, Philadelphia, and Boston were hit with epidemics. In 1793, one of the largest yellow fever epidemics in U.S. history killed as many as 5,000 people in Philadelphia—roughly 10% of the population.

  3. Yellow Plague | Article about Yellow Plague by The Free ...

    encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Yellow+Plague

    Yellow fever begins suddenly after an incubation period of three to five days. In mild cases only fever and headache may be present. The severe form of the disease commences with fever, chills, bleeding into the skin, rapid heartbeat, headache, back pains, and extreme prostration.

  4. Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia | Yellow Fever

    philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/archive/yellow-fever

    Yellow Fever in Philadelphia. Billy G. Smith and Paul Sivitz, Montana State University.. Yellow Fever broke out in epidemic proportion in 1793, 1797, 1798, and 1799. The most severe, and one of the most deadly in American history, occurred in 1793, when an estimated 5,000 inhabitants died.

  5. Viruses were confirmed as human pathogens in 1901, with the discovery of the yellow fever virus by Walter Reed. [5] Immunology made a great advance towards the end of the 19th century, through rapid developments, in the study of humoral immunity ( antibodies ) and cellular immunity ( T cells and dendritic cells ).

  6. Yellow Fever in Alabama | Encyclopedia of Alabama

    www.encyclopediaofalabama.org/article/h-3990

    Jun 05, 2018 · Yellow fever is a tropical and subtropical disease that had a significant impact on Alabama's history and early settlement. The exact origins of the disease are unclear, but historians generally believe that it evolved in Africa and spread via colonial trade to the Americas in the sixteenth century. Recorded by the earliest French settlers in Mobile in 1704, the last outbreak was reported in ...

  7. Yellow fever virus - definition of ... - The Free Dictionary

    www.thefreedictionary.com/yellow+fever+virus

    Define yellow fever virus. yellow fever virus synonyms, yellow fever virus pronunciation, yellow fever virus translation, English dictionary definition of yellow fever virus. n. An infectious tropical disease caused by a flavivirus transmitted by mosquitoes of the genera Aedes, especially A. aegypti, and Haemagogus and...

  8. Yellow disease - definition of yellow disease by The Free ...

    www.thefreedictionary.com/yellow+disease

    Define yellow disease. yellow disease synonyms, yellow disease pronunciation, yellow disease translation, English dictionary definition of yellow disease. xanthochromia. Translations. English: xan·tho·chro·mi·a n. xantocromía, color amarillento visto en placas de la piel o en el líquido.

  9. Yellow fir | Article about yellow fir by The Free Dictionary

    encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/yellow+fir

    Looking for yellow fir? Find out information about yellow fir. A strong, medium-density, medium- to coarse-textured softwood; widely used for plywood and as lumber and timber in construction work Explanation of yellow fir

  10. Yellow Plague - definition of Yellow Plague by The Free ...

    www.thefreedictionary.com/Yellow+Plague

    Yellow Plague synonyms, Yellow Plague pronunciation, Yellow Plague translation, English dictionary definition of Yellow Plague. n. An infectious tropical disease caused by a flavivirus transmitted by mosquitoes of the genera Aedes, especially A. aegypti, and Haemagogus and...