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  1. County of Tyrol - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/County_of_Tyrol

    The County of Tyrol was an estate of the Holy Roman Empire established about 1140. Originally a jurisdiction under the sovereignty of the Counts of Tyrol, it was inherited by the Counts of Gorizia in 1253 and finally fell to the Austrian House of Habsburg in 1363. In 1804 the Princely County of Tyrol, unified with the secularised prince-bishoprics of Trent and Brixen, became a crown land of the Austrian Empire in 1804 and from 1867 a Cisleithanian crown land of Austria-Hungary. Today the territo

    • History

      At least since German king Otto I had conquered the former...

    • Counts of Tyrol

      County bequeathed to Albert's son-in-law: 1. Meinhard I...

  2. Tyrol - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyrol_(region)

    The southern part of Tyrol is located in Northern Italy and the northern part in Western Austria. The region consists of present-day Tyrol–South Tyrol–Trentino Euroregion, including Cortina d'Ampezzo, Fodóm (Buchenstein), Col (Verseil), Valvestino, Magasa and Pedemonte. Capital.

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  4. Tyrol (state) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyrol_(state)
    • Overview
    • Geography
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    Tyrol (/tɪˈroʊl, taɪ-, ˈtaɪroʊl/; German: Tirol (listen); Italian: Tirolo Italian pronunciation:; is a federal state (Bundesland) in western Austria. It comprises the Austrian part of the historical Princely County of Tyrol. It is a constituent part of the present-day Euroregion Tyrol–South Tyrol–Trentino (together with South Tyrol and Trentino in Italy). The capital of Tyrol is Innsbruck.

    The state of Tyrol is separated into two parts, divided by a 7-kilometre wide strip. The larger territory is called North Tyrol and the smaller area is called East Tyrol. The neighbouring Austrian state of Salzburg stands to the east, while on the south Tyrol has a border with the Italian province of South Tyrol which was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire before the First World War. With a land area of 12,683.85 km2, Tyrol is the third-largest state in Austria. Tyrol shares its borders with th

    In ancient times, the region was split between the Roman provinces of Raetia and Noricum. From the mid-6th century, it was resettled by Germanic Bavarii tribes. In the Early Middle Ages it formed the southern part of the German stem duchy of Bavaria, until the Counts of Tyrol, former Vogt officials of the Trent and Brixen prince-bishops at Tyrol Castle, achieved imperial immediacy after the deposition of the Bavarian duke Henry the Proud in 1138, and their possessions formed a state of the Holy

    The Gross domestic product of the state was 34.6 billion € in 2018, accounting for 9% of the Austria's economic output. GDP per capita adjusted for purchasing power was 40,900 € or 136% of the EU27 average in the same year.

    Tyrol has long been a central hub for European long-distance routes and thus a transit land for trans-European trade over the Alps. As early as the 1st century B.C. Tyrol had one of the most important north-south links of the Roman Empire, the Via Claudia Augusta. Roman roads crossed the Tyrol from the Po Plain in present-day Italy, following the course of the Etsch and Eisack in present South Tyrol over the Brenner and then following the northern Wipp valley to Hall. From there roads branched a

    • 12,640.17 km² (4,880.40 sq mi)
    • Innsbruck
    • AT-7
    • Austria
  5. The (Princely) County of Tyrol was an es­tate of the Holy Roman Em­pire es­tab­lished about 1140. Orig­i­nally a ju­ris­dic­tion under the sov­er­eignty of the Counts of Tyrol, it was in­her­ited by the Counts of Go­rizia in 1253 and fi­nally fell to the Aus­trian House of Hab­s­burg in 1363.

  6. The (Princely) County of Tyrol was an estate of the Holy Roman Empire established about 1140. Originally a jurisdiction under the sovereignty of the Counts of Tyrol, it was inherited by the Counts of Gorizia in 1253 and finally fell to the Austrian House of Habsburg in 1363.

  7. County of Tyrol

    enacademic.com/dic.nsf/enwiki/11583030

    The County of Tyrol, Princely County from 1504, was a State of the Holy Roman Empire, from 1814 a province of the Austrian Empire and from 1867 a Cisleithanian crown land (Kronland) of Austria-Hungary.

  8. Meinhard I, Count of Gorizia-Tyrol - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meinhard_I,_Count_of...

    Meinhard and Albert IV of Tyrol also had to pay a compensation and to renounce certain possessions including Mittersill, Virgen, Matrei and Oberdrauburg. Upon the death of Count Albert IV of Tyrol in 1253, Meinhard and his brother-in-law, Count Gebhard of Hirschberg , split Tyrol, of which Meinhard took the southern part with Meran , in ...

  9. Tyrolean - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyrolean

    Tyrolean may refer to: . Anything from Tyrol (state) (Austria), South Tyrol (Italy) or the historical County of Tyrol or region of Tyrol; Tyrolean Zugspitze Cable Car; Tyrolean Airways

  10. Margaret, Countess of Tyrol - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret,_Countess_of_Tyrol

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Margaret, nicknamed Margarete Maultasch (1318 – 3 October 1369), was the last Countess of Tyrol from the House of Gorizia (Meinhardiner), and an unsuccessful claimant to the Duchy of Carinthia. Upon her death, Tyrol became united with the Austrian hereditary lands of the Habsburg dynasty.

  11. County of Gorizia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/County_of_Görz

    In 1253 the Counts of Gorizia inherited the County of Tyrol, from 1271 onwards ruled by the Gorizia-Tyrol branch which became extinct in the male line in 1335. The younger line ruled the comital lands of Gorizia and Lienz until its extinction in 1500, whereafter the estates were finally acquired by the Austrian House of Habsburg .