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  1. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Middle_IrishMiddle Irish - Wikipedia

    Middle Irish, sometimes called Middle Gaelic (Irish: An Mheán-Ghaeilge), is the Goidelic which was spoken in Ireland, most of Scotland and the Isle of Man from c. 900–1200 AD; it is therefore a contemporary of late Old English and early Middle English.

    • Grammar

      Middle Irish is a fusional, VSO, nominative-accusative...

    • Example

      The following is a poem in Middle Irish about Eógan Bél,...

    • Outdated Definition
    • Gaelic/Irish
    • Lebor Bretnach
    • A Bit More, please...?
    • Pronunciation

    This is entirely obsolete. "Middle Irish" is today only used for the form of the language used in the 10th to 12th centuries, i.e. after Old Irish but before Classical (Early Modern) Irish. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 195.16.202.19 (talk • contribs) . 1. You seem to know what you're talking about; can you then edit the article or provide a reference for more information so we can do the same? --Saforrest 17:20, 8 April 2006 (UTC) 1.1. The anon is quite right; I'm adding some sources showing that the term "Middle Irish" refers to the language only to the end of the 12th century. —Angr21:53, 2 February 2007 (UTC)

    "Gaelic" and "Irish" do not mean the same thing. Irish is a Gaelic language but not all Gaelic languages are Irish. "Middle Irish" is (historically at least) the most common name applied to the medieval form of Gaelic which was spoken across half the British Isles so even though Middle Gaelic ("Irish" is, of course, an English exonym and "Middle Irish" an anachronism) would be a far more accurate term to use its fairly reasonable to have the article under the "Middle Irish" heading. However there is no reason to mislead by referring to all Gaelic dialects as "the Irish language" in the body of the text. While "Middle Irish" is often used as a blanket term (as inaccurate as this is) for medieval Gaelic "Irish language" is not. siarach (talk) 23:36, 17 January 2008 (UTC) 1. Nevertheless, the language is called Middle Irish in the literature, and it's not Wikipedia's place to change that. See WP:NOR. —Angr If you've written a quality article... 05:03, 18 January 2008 (UTC) 1.1. It is a...

    Why is that there? What is said has nothing to do with Irish, Middle or not. It should be on a page about Lebor Bretnach, if anything, not Middle Irish. If it stays, it should be made relevant to the page topic somehow. Graidan (talk) 19:55, 17 November 2014 (UTC)

    This article is rather meagre, especially compared to the Old Irish article. In particular, I miss a lot of linguistic information: what makes it distinct from Old Irish and Early Modern Irish? How did the sounds evolve? Where did the grammar stand on the continuum from synthetic to analytic? Did the dual still exist? The accusative case? How far apart were the dialects at this stage? There must be enough people around here who know. Steinbach (talk) 13:42, 12 April 2016 (UTC)

    In addition to the above complaint, I'd like to remark the following. According to the article, the name of the language was 'Gaoidhealg', pronounced [ˈɡɯːʝeɫɡ]. Was that really the pronunciation in Middle Irish? Or is that rather how this word would be pronounced by a modern speaker of Irish? Back in the 10th century, it probably sounded more like [gaʊðjæɫg]. Or maybe I'm mistaken - but isn't it very unlikely that a scribe back than would have written his language so un-phonetically? Steinbach (talk) 12:47, 4 December 2017 (UTC)

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  3. Irish ( Gaeilge in Standard Irish ), sometimes controversially referred to as Gaelic, is a Goidelic language of the Insular Celtic branch of the Celtic language family, which is a part of the Indo-European language family. Irish originated on the island of Ireland and was the population's first language until the late 18th century.

  4. Middle Irish is the form of Irish used from the 10th to 12th centuries; it is therefore a contemporary of late Old English and early Middle English. It is the language of a large amount of literature, including the entire Ulster Cycle .

  5. www.wikizero.com › en › Middle_Irish_languageWikizero - Middle Irish

    Middle Irish, sometimes called Middle Gaelic (Irish: An Mheán-Ghaeilge), is the Goidelic which was spoken in Ireland, most of Scotland and the Isle of Man from c. 900–1200 AD; it is therefore a contemporary of late Old English and early Middle English.

  6. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Irish_peopleIrish people - Wikipedia

    Ireland: The Irish Publishing Co. ISBN 978-0-517-06408-5. Retrieved 17 March 2013. McLaughlin, Mark G. (1980). The Wild Geese: The Irish Brigades of France and Spain. Christopher Warner, illustrator. Osprey Publishing. ISBN 978-0-85045-358-4. Nicholls, Kenneth W. (1972). Gaelic and Gaelicised Ireland in the Middle Ages. Gill and Macmillan.

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