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  1. Why Do Canadians Speak French? - WorldAtlas

    www.worldatlas.com/articles/how-did-the-french...

    May 30, 2019 · A further 14.2% of the population speaks a language other than English or French at home while 5.8% speak those languages on a regular basis as a secondary language in addition to French or English. French is the official language in the province of Quebec which is home to most of the native French speakers. 95% of the population of Quebec ...

    • John Misachi
  2. Why Is French Spoken in Canada? - Culture Trip

    theculturetrip.com/north-america/canada/quebec/...

    Although Canada is a predominantly English-speaking country, there are francophone communities throughout its provinces. In fact, according to the 2016 census, French is the native language of around 7.2 million Canadians—or about 20 percent of the total population.

  3. French language in Canada - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_language_in_Canada

    Michif, a dialect of French originating in Western Canada, is a unique mixed language derived from Cree and French. It is spoken by a small number of Métis living mostly in Manitoba and in North Dakota. Northern Canada. French is an official language in each of the three northern territories: the Yukon, the Northwest Territories, and Nunavut.

  4. French Canadian Facts for Kids

    kids.kiddle.co/French_Canadian
    • History
    • Population
    • Language
    • Religion
    • Modern Usage

    The French were the first Europeans to permanently colonize what is now Quebec, parts of Ontario, Acadia, and select areas of Western Canada, all in Canada (See French colonization of the Americas.) Their colonies of New France (also commonly called Canada) stretched across what today are the Maritime provinces, southern Quebec and Ontario, as well as the entire Mississippi RiverValley. The first permanent European settlements in Canada were at Port Royal in 1605 and Quebec City in 1608 as fur trading posts. The territories of New France were Canada, Acadia (later renamed Nova Scotia), and Louisiana. The inhabitants of Canada called themselves the Canadiens, and came mostly from northwestern France. The early inhabitants of Acadia, or Acadiens, came mostly but not exclusively from the Southwestern region of France. Canadien explorers and fur traders would come to be known as coureurs des bois, while those who settled on farms in Canada would come to be known as habitants. Many Frenc...

    People who today claim some French-Canadian ancestry or heritage number some 7 million in Canada and 2.4 million people in the United States. (An additional 8.4 million Americans claim French ancestry; they are treated as a separate ethnic group by the U.S. Census Bureau.)

    Canadian French is an umbrella term for the distinct varieties of French spoken by francophone Canadians: Québécois (Quebec French), Acadian French, Métis French, and Newfoundland French. Unlike Acadian French and Newfoundland French, the French of Ontario, the Canadian West, and New England all originate from what is now Quebec French and do not constitute distinct varieties from it, though there are some regional differences. French Canadians may also speak either Canadian English or American English. In Quebec, about six million French Canadians are native French speakers. 599,225 (7.7% of population) are English-speaking, Anglophones or English-speaking Quebecers, and others are Allophones (literally "other-speakers", meaning, in practice, immigrants who speak neither French nor English at home). In the United States, assimilation to the English languagewas more significant and very few Americans of French-Canadian ancestry or heritage speak French today. Six million of Canada's...

    The pre-revolutionary kingdom of France forbade non-Catholic settlement in New France from 1629 onward and almost all French settlers of Canada were Roman Catholic. In the United States, some French Catholics have converted to Protestantism. Until the 1960s, religion was a central component of French-Canadian national identity. The Church parish was the focal point of civic life in French-Canadian society, and religious orders ran French-Canadian schools, hospitals and orphanages and were very controlling of every day life in general. During the Quiet Revolution of the 1960s, however, the practice of Catholicism dropped drastically. Church attendance in Quebec currently remains low. Rates of religious observance among French Canadians outside Quebec tend to vary by region, and by age. In general, however, those in Quebec are the least observant, while those in the United States of America and other places away from Quebec tend to be the most observant. There are also French Canadian...

    In English usage, the terms for provincial subgroups, if used at all, are usually defined solely by province of residence, with all of the terms being strictly interchangeable with French Canadian. Although this remains the more common usage in English, it is considered outdated to many Canadians of French descent, especially in Quebec. Most francophone Canadians who use the provincial labels identify with their province of origin, even if it is not the province in which they currently reside; for example, a Québécois who moved to Manitoba would notchange his own self-identification to Franco-Manitoban. Increasingly, provincial labels are used to stress the linguistic and cultural, as opposed to ethnic and religious, nature of French-speaking institutions and organizations. The term "French Canadian" is still used in historical and cultural contexts, or when it is necessary to refer to Canadians of French-Canadian collectively, such as in the name and mandate of a national organizat...

  5. French Canadians - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Canadians

    Six million of Canada's native French speakers, of all origins, are found in the province of Quebec, where they constitute the majority language group, and another one million are distributed throughout the rest of Canada. Roughly 31% of Canadian citizens are French-speaking and 25% are of French-Canadian descent.

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  7. French Language in Canada | The Canadian Encyclopedia

    www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/french...
    • Francophones in Canada
    • Recent History of Francophones in Canada
    • The French Spoken in Canada

    A broad demographic portrait of francophones in Canada can be drawn from the responses to three language-related questions in the national census: those regarding mother tongue (first language learned at home in childhood), knowledge of the two official languages (ability to converse in these two languages), and language used most often in the home. Canadians with French as their Mother Tongue According to the 2011 census, the population of Canada includes 7,054,975 people who have French as...

    The late 1960s and the two decades that followed marked a turning point in the history of francophones in Canada. During this period, the francophones of Québec regained control of their linguistic destiny by enacting a number of laws, including, in 1977, the Charte de la langue française (Charter of the French Language, commonly known as Bill 101), which made French Québec’s only official language. This statute gives francophones the right to communicate in French at work, notably in the eco...

    Two main kinds of French are spoken in Canada: 1) the French spoken in Québec and by descendants of Quebecers in the provinces west of Québec, and 2) the French spoken by Acadians. Other variants include the French spoken: 1) by Métis people, who are the descendants of unions between French voyageurs and Aboriginal women in the 18th century; 2) by descendants of immigrants from France, Belgium and Switzerland who settled in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta in the late 19th and early 20th ce...

  8. How did Canada come to speak french - Answers

    www.answers.com/Q/How_did_Canada_come_to_speak...

    France used to own large parts of Canada, like Britain used to own large parts of the US. Much of Canada was originally settled by french immigrants, but the french speaking colonists were ...

  9. French language | Origin, History, Grammar, & Speakers ...

    www.britannica.com/topic/French-language

    Canadian French. Outside France, the French of Canada, originally probably of northwestern dialect type, has developed the most individual features. Although 18th-century Canadian French was regarded as exceptionally “pure” by metropolitan commentators, it began to diverge from Parisian French after 1760 as a consequence of its isolation from the metropolis and of the ever-stronger ...

  10. French Canadians - Introduction, Location, Language, Folklore ...

    www.everyculture.com/.../French-Canadians.html

    The French presence in Canada began in 1534, but permanent settlement did not begin until Samuel de Champlain founded Quebec City in 1608. The French eventually carved out an enormous territory stretching as far east as the Maritime provinces and south to the Gulf of Mexico.

  11. French Immigration in Canada | The Canadian Encyclopedia

    www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/french...
    • The Colonists
    • Religious Settlers
    • Farmers
    • Professionals and Entrepreneurs
    • Recent Immigrants and Maintenance of The French Language

    In 1754, the population of New France was 55,000. The colonists had come from various regions in France over more than a century, and mainly lived in the cities and seigneuries of the St. Lawrence River Valley. At the end of the Seven Years’ War, France, Great Britain and Spain ratified the Treaty of Paris (1763). France ceded the majority of its North American possessions, including Île-Royale (Cape Breton Island), Canada and the Great Lakes Basin. It also gave up the territories east of the Mississippi — which at that time were eastern Louisiana — except for New Orleans, having given western Louisiana to Spain in 1762. It retained fishing rights in part of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and repossessed the islands of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon. Paris was not encouraging emigration to its former colony. London was wary of this, since it already needed to pacify the French habitants for fear of them joining the Americans, who were in the midst of a full-fledged revolution(1775–1783). Thes...

    French immigrants’ influence in the British colony was heavier than their demographic weight. This was because many such immigrants were professionals or religious practitioners who contributed to rebuilding and shaping a French-Canadian elitein the 19th and 20th centuries. For one thing, 51 refractory priests immigrated to Canada during the French Revolution and breathed new life into the Canadian Catholic Church. They founded new parishes from the Gulf of St. Lawrence to Upper Canada via Saguenay and the Eastern Townships, introducing their traditions and renewing devotion to ancien régimeFrance. In Nova Scotia, Jean-Mandé Sigognere-established religious practice in Saint Mary’s Bay starting in 1799. He also established schools there and acted as an important intermediary between this isolated, illiterate population and the British authorities. In 1806, Jean Raimbault was appointed superior of the Nicolet Seminary (founded in 1803); he served in that capacity until his death in 18...

    A rapprochement between France and Canada came about in the mid-19th century. This was thanks to the visit from a corvette called La Capricieuse (1855), the first French warship to sail in St. Lawrence waters since the Conquest, and also due to the establishment of a French consulate in Quebec City (1859). In addition, the gold rushon the Pacific coast and the prospect of another Canadian conquest were making mouths water in Europe. In Canada, fears of the United States annexing the West spurred authorities to occupy the land more quickly. Furthermore, farmland in Quebec was dwindling, pushing French Canadians to clear Quebec backcountry as well as land across the border in New Brunswick, New England, Ontario and the Canadian Prairies. The French Canadians were unable to bring the land under cultivation fast enough. In response, the governments and the Church used several methods to attract French immigrants — Canadian agents posted in France, transatlantic exchanges within Catholic...

    During the Great Depressionin the 1930s, French Canadians were not necessarily in favour of immigration because it created competition for the rare jobs available. The French community’s cohesion in Canada during this period is difficult to get a handle on. For instance, no Canadian city had a “French Quarter,” and although Alliances Françaises had existed since the late 19th century, it proved more difficult to unite French immigrants than immigrants from other communities of European descent. Thus, Gabriel Bonneau, Charles de Gaulle’s representative in Canada, was not able to rally his compatriots behind the general until 1943. After the Second World War, the Canadian government wanted to encourage immigration, and in 1948 began to consider the French to be as desirable a cohort as the Americans and the British. The Canadian Embassy in Paris received up to 5,000 requests for information per month, but France halted the exodus because it needed labourers to rebuild the country. Bet...

    At present, a large proportion of francophone immigrants in Torontoand Vancouver send their children to English school. As it turns out, English attracts even francophones. Still, French-language school attendance is the best way to foster integration into the French-Canadian community. English, bilingual and pluralist schools are facing a dilemma, which sociologist Monica Heller summarizes as follows: Benefitting from the contribution of new groups (e.g. immigrants, Quebecers, anglophones, bilinguals, etc.) while not losing sight of the main objective: maintaining and promoting the French language and culture. In contemporary pedagogy, the student is viewed as an intermediary between their parents and the history, culture and political demands of the host francophone community. The establishment of a “renewed culture” among youth remains a work in progress. In fact, parents do not have the time to get involved in the community, and immigrants identify very little with it. As a resu...