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  1. United States dollar - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › United_States_dollar

    The United States dollar (symbol: $; code: USD; also abbreviated US$ or U.S. Dollar, to distinguish it from other dollar-denominated currencies; referred to as the dollar, U.S. dollar, American dollar, or colloquially buck) is the official currency of the United States and its territories.

    • April 2, 1792; 229 years ago
    • $, US$, U$
  2. Dollar coin (United States) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Dollar_coin_(United_States)

    The dollar coin is a United States coin with a face value of one United States dollar.It is the second largest U.S. coin currently minted for circulation in terms of physical size, with a diameter of 1.043 inches (26.5 millimeters) and a thickness of 0.079 in (2.0 mm), coming second to the half dollar.

    • 26.5 mm (1.043 in)
    • 8.100 g (0.260 troy oz)
  3. United States dollar - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › American_dollar
    • Denominations and Value
    • Federal Reserve
    • Meeting The Variable Demand For Cash
    • Maintaining A Cash Inventory
    • Gallery
    • Other Websites

    The American one dollar bill has a picture of George Washington. There are currently paperbills (currency) of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 dollars. All U.S. dollar currency has been the same size, shape and general design since 1928. This is unlike some countries where bank notes with different values have different sizes. The U.S. also has dollar coins. Some are silver colored and some are gold colored. Vending machinesoften give dollar coins as change, since it is easier for the machines to give out coins than paper money. Some of the more advanced vending machines give out paper money as change. Paper dollars are much more common than dollar coins. The US dollar in subdivided into cents, and 100 cents equals 1 US dollar. One cent can be written as either $0.01 or 1¢. The cent or "penny" (not to be confused with the English penny sterling) is the least worth coin used in the U.S.. There are several different coins with different cent values of different materials and sizes. There...

    The paper "dollar bill" is actually called a "Federal ReserveNote". Federal Reserve notes are legal tender currency notes. The twelve Federal Reserve Banks issue them into circulation pursuant to the Federal Reserve Act of 1913. A commercial bank belonging to the Federal Reserve System can obtain Federal Reserve notes from the Federal Reserve Bank in its district whenever it wishes by paying for them in full, dollar for dollar, from its account with Federal Reserve Bank. Federal Reserve Banks get the notes from the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP). It pays the BEP for the cost of producing the notes. Congress has specified that a Federal Reserve Bank must hold collateral equal in value to the Federal Reserve notes that the Bank receives. This collateral is chiefly gold certificates and United States securities. This provides backing for the note issue. Federal Reserve notes are not redeemable in gold, silver or any other commodity, and receive no backing by anything. This...

    The public typically obtains its cash from banks by withdrawing cash from automated teller machines (ATMs) or by cashing checks. The amount of cash that the public holds varies seasonally, by the day of the month, and even by the day of the week. For example, people demand a large amount of cash for shopping and vacations during the year-end holiday season. Also, people typically withdraw cash at ATMs over the weekend, so there is more cash in circulation on Monday than on Friday. To meet the demands of their customers, banks get cash from Federal Reserve Banks. Most medium- and large-sized banks maintain reserve accounts at one of the 12 regional Federal Reserve Banks, and they pay for the cash they get from the Fed by having those accounts debited. Some smaller banks maintain their required reserves at larger, "correspondent," banks. The smaller banks get cash through the correspondent banks, which charge a fee for the service. The larger banks get currency from the Fed and pass i...

    Each of the 12 Federal Reserve Banks keeps an inventory of cash on hand to meet the needs of the depository institutions in its District. Extended custodial inventory sites in several continents promote the use of U.S. currency internationally, improve the collection of information on currency flows, and help local banks meet the public's demand for U.S. currency. Additions to that supply come directly from the two divisions of the Treasury Department that produce the cash: the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, which prints currency, and the United States Mint, which makes coins. Most of the inventory consists of deposits by banks that had more cash than they needed to serve their customers and deposited the excess at the Fed to help meet their reserve requirements. When a Federal Reserve Bank receives a cash deposit from a bank, it checks the individual notes to determine whether they are fit for future circulation. About one-third of the notes that the Fed receives are not fit, an...

    The Great Seal of the United Statesis on the back of the $1 Bill
    the back of the bill showing the signing of the Declaration of Independence

    Heiko Otto (ed.). "Banknotes of the United States" (in English and German). Retrieved 2017-03-10. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

  4. Coins of the United States dollar - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Coins_of_the_United_States
    • Overview
    • Current coinage
    • Obsolete and canceled coins
    • Mill coins

    Coins of the United States dollar were first minted in 1792. New coins have been produced annually and they make up a valuable aspect of the United States currency system. Today, circulating coins exist in denominations of 1¢, 5¢, 10¢, 25¢, 50¢, and $1.00. Also minted are bullion and commemorative coins. All of these are produced by the United States Mint. The coins are then sold to Federal Reserve Banks which in turn are responsible for putting coins into circulation and withdrawing...

    Today, four mints operate in the United States producing billions of coins each year. The main mint is the Philadelphia Mint, which produces circulating coinage, mint sets and some commemorative coins. The Denver Mint also produces circulating coinage, mint sets and commemoratives. The San Francisco Mint produces regular and silver proof coinage, and produced circulating coinage until the 1970s. The West Point Mint produces bullion coinage. Philadelphia and Denver produce the dies used at all of

    Note: It is a common misconception that "eagle"-based nomenclature for gold U.S. coinage was merely slang. The "eagle," "half-eagle" and "quarter-eagle" were specifically given these names in the Coinage Act of 1792. Likewise, the double eagle was specifically created as such by name. Some modern commemorative coins have been minted in the silver dollar, half-eagle and eagle denominations. See also US coin sizes, showing all major U.S. coin series and scaled images in a single chart. The law gov

    Although the term mill was defined in the eighteenth century as 1⁄1,000 of a dollar or 0.1¢, no coin smaller than 0.5¢ has ever been officially minted in the U.S. However, unofficial mill coins, also called "tenth cent" or "tax-help coins", made of diverse materials—plastic, wood, tin, and others—were produced as late as the 1960s by some states, localities, and private businesses for tax payments and to render change for small purchases.

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  6. United States one-dollar bill - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › United_States_one-dollar_bill
    • Overview
    • History
    • Obverse of current $1 bill
    • Reverse of current $1 bill
    • Collecting Federal Reserve dollar bills
    • Prosecution for the possession of a $1 bill

    The United States one-dollar bill since 1876 has been the lowest value denomination of United States paper currency. An image of the first U.S. President, George Washington, based on the Athenaeum Portrait, a 1796 painting by Gilbert Stuart, is currently featured on the obverse, and the Great Seal of the United States is featured on the reverse. The one-dollar bill has the oldest overall design of all U.S. currency currently being produced. The obverse design of the dollar bill seen today debute

    1. 1862: The first one-dollar bill was issued as a Legal Tender Note with a portrait of Salmon P. Chase, the Secretary of the Treasury who served under President Abraham Lincoln. 2. 1869: The $1 United States Note was redesigned with a portrait of George Washington in the center

    In 1928, all currency was changed to the size which is familiar today. The first one-dollar bills were issued as silver certificates under Series of 1928. The Treasury seal and serial numbers were dark blue. The obverse was nearly identical to the Series of 1923 $1 silver certifi

    The portrait of George Washington is displayed in the center of the obverse of the one-dollar bill, as it has been since the 1869 design. The oval containing George Washington is propped up by bunches of bay laurel leaves. To the left of George Washington is the Federal Reserve District seal. The name of the Federal Reserve Bank that issued the note encircles a capital letter, identifying it among the twelve Federal Reserve Banks. The sequential number of the bank is also displayed in the four c

    The reverse of the one-dollar bill has an ornate design that incorporates both sides of the Great Seal of the United States to the left and right of the word ONE. This word appears prominently in the white space at the center of the bill in a capitalized, shadowed, and seriffed typeface. A smaller image of the word "ONE" is superimposed over the numeral "1" in each of the four corners of the bill. "THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" spans the top of the bill, "ONE DOLLAR" is emblazoned along the bott

    Except for significant errors, and series 1988A web notes printed in small batches for some of the Federal Reserve districts, green seal dollars are of little collector value. However, two notes have generated public interest, although neither is scarce. In 1963 dollar bills were produced for the Eleventh Federal Reserve District, headquartered in Dallas. Since the FRD jurisdictions are sequentially numbered, notes received the corresponding letter "K", for the 11th letter of the alphabet. Some

    In Turkey the possession of a one-dollar bill can lead to a prosecution and sentence for terror related charges because it is seen as evidence for being a member of the Gülen Movement founded by Fethullah Gülen, which is seen as a terror organization in Turkey. Turkish authorities believe that Gülen used to present a one dollar bill to his followers and that they showed it to one another in order to make them recognizable.

    • 2.61 inches ≈ 66.3 mm
    • Approx. 1 g
    • $7000000000000
    • 6.14 inches ≈ 156.1 mm
  7. Half dollar (United States coin) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Half_dollar_(United_States
    • Overview
    • Circulation
    • Aspects of early history

    The half dollar, sometimes referred to as the half for short or 50-cent piece, is a United States coin worth 50 cents, or one half of a dollar. It is the largest United States circulating coin currently produced in both size and weight, being 1.205 inches in diameter and 0.085 in in thickness, and is twice the weight of the quarter. The coin's design has undergone a number of changes throughout its history. Since 1964, the half dollar depicts the profile of President John F. Kennedy on the obver

    Half-dollar coins once saw heavy use, particularly in the first half of the 20th century. For many years, they were commonly used by gamblers at casinos and other venues with slot machines. Rolls of half dollars may still be kept on hand in cardrooms for games requiring 50-cent antes or bring-in bets, for dealers to pay winning naturals in blackjack, or where the house collects a rake in increments. Additionally, some concession vendors at sporting events distribute half-dollar coins as change f

    On December 1, 1794, the first half dollars, approximately 5,300 pieces, were delivered. Another 18,000 were produced in January 1795 using dies of 1794, to save the expense of making new ones. Another 30,000 pieces were struck by the end of 1801. The coin had the Heraldic Eagle, based on the Great Seal of the United States on the reverse. 150,000 were minted in 1804 but struck with dies from 1803, so no 1804 specimens exist, though there were some pieces dated 1805 that carried a "5 over 4" ove

    • 30.61 mm (1.205 in)
    • 11.340 g (0.365 troy oz)
  8. United States - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › United_States

    The United States is the third most populous nation in the world, after China and India. In 2020 the median age of the United States population was 38.5 years. In 2018, there were almost 90 million immigrants and U.S.-born children of immigrants in the United States, accounting for 28% of the overall U.S. population.

  9. United States dollar - Wikipedia

    hif.wikipedia.org › wiki › United_States_dollar

    United States dollar, nai to American dollar, United States of America ke official currency hae. Likhe ke time American dollar ke ( $) symbol ke kaam me laae ke likha jaawe hae. Dollar ke USD (U.S. Dollar) ke naam se bhi jaana jaawe hae. Front of a US dollar bill.

  10. 51st United States Congress - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › 51st_United_States_Congress

    The 51st United States Congress, referred to by some critics as the Billion Dollar Congress, was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C., from March 4, 1889, to March 4, 1891, during the first ...

    • 88 senators, 332 representatives, 9 non-voting delegates
    • Republican
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