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      • A subsidiary is an independent company that is more than 50% owned by another firm. The owner is usually referred to as the parent company or holding company.
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  2. Subsidiary Company: What Is It?

    www.thebalancesmb.com/what-is-a-subsidiary...

    Jun 30, 2020 · A subsidiary company is a company that is completely or partially owned by another company, which may be a parent company that also has business operations or a holding company whose sole purpose is to own its subsidiaries. 1  The holding or parent company must own more than 50% of the subsidiary company.

  3. Subsidiary Definition - investopedia.com

    www.investopedia.com/terms/s/subsidiary.asp

    May 10, 2019 · In the corporate world, a subsidiary is a company that belongs to another company, which is usually referred to as the parent company or the holding company. The parent holds a controlling interest...

  4. Subsidiary - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subsidiary

    A subsidiary, subsidiary company or daughter company is a company that is owned or controlled by another company, which is called the parent company, parent, or holding company. The subsidiary can be a company, corporation, or limited liability company. In some cases it is a government or state-owned enterprise .

  5. Subsidiary - What is a Subsidiary Company and How Does it Work

    corporatefinanceinstitute.com/resources/...
    • What Are The Attributes of A Subsidiary?
    • Advantages
    • Disadvantages
    • Example of A Subsidiary Structure
    • Additional Resources

    A subsidiary operates as a separate and distinct corporationCorporationWhat is a corporation? A corporation is a legal entity created by individuals, stockholders, or shareholders, with the purpose of operating for profit. The creation involves a legal process called incorporation where legal documents containing the primary purpose of the business, name, and location from its parent company. This benefits the company for the purposes of taxation, regulation, and liability. The sub can sue an...

    A parent company can substantially reduce tax liability through deducations allowed by the state. For parent companies with multiple subsidiaries, the income liability from gains made by one sub can often be offset by losses in another. The parent-subsidiary framework mitigates risk because it creates a separation of legal entities. Losses incurred by a subsidiary do not readily transfer to the parent. In case of bankruptcy, however, the subsidiary’s obligations may be assigned to the parent...

    A parent may have management control issues with its subsidiary if the sub is partly owned by other entities. Decision-making may also become somewhat tedious since issues must be decided through the chain of command within the parent bureaucracy before action can be taken. Lengthy and costly legal paperwork burdens result, both from the formation of a subsidiary company and in filing taxes.

    One popular parent company in the digital industry is Facebook. Aside from being publicly traded on the open market, it also has multiple investment portfolios in other companies within the social media industry and is the parent firm of several software technology sub companies.Examples of Facebook sub-companies are: 1. Instagram, LLC – a photo-sharing site acquired by Facebook in April 2012 for approximately US$1B in cash and stock. Instagram remains separate in its operational management,...

    Thank you for reading this guide to sub-companies and the various pros and cons of this type of corporate hierarchy. CFI’s mission is to help you become the best financial analyst possible. With that goal in mind, these additional resources can help you on your way: 1. BankruptcyBankruptcyBankruptcy is the legal status of a human or a non-human entity (a firm or a government agency) that is unable to repay its outstanding debts to creditors. Generally, it is initiated by the debtor and impose...

  6. Subsidiary company legal definition of subsidiary company

    legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/...
    • Summary
    • Formation
    • Purpose
    • Risks

    A subsidiary corporation or company is one in which another, generally larger, corporation, known as the parent corporation, owns all or at least a majority of the shares. As the owner of the subsidiary, the parent corporation may control the activities of the subsidiary. This arrangement differs from a merger, in which a corporation purchases another company and dissolves the purchased company's organizational structure and identity.

    Subsidiaries can be formed in different ways and for various reasons. A corporation can form a subsidiary either by purchasing a controlling interest in an existing company or by creating the company itself. When a corporation acquires an existing company, forming a subsidiary can be preferable to a merger because the parent corporation can acquire a controlling interest with a smaller investment than a merger would require. In addition, the approval of the stockholders of the acquired firm is not required as it would be in the case of a merger.

    When a company is purchased, the parent corporation may determine that the acquired company's name recognition in the market merits making it a subsidiary rather than merging it with the parent. A subsidiary may also produce goods or services that are completely different from those produced by the parent corporation. In that case it would not make sense to merge the operations.Corporations that operate in more than one country often find it useful or necessary to create subsidiaries. For example, a multinational corporation may create a subsidiary in a country to obtain favorable tax treatment, or a country may require multinational corporations to establish local subsidiaries in order to do business there.

    One disadvantage of the parent-subsidiary relationship is the possibility of multiple taxation. Another is the duty of the parent corporation to promote the subsidiary's corporate interests, to act in its best interest, and to maintain a separate corporate identity. If the parent fails to meet these requirements, the courts will perceive the subsidiary as merely a business conduit for the parent, and the two corporations will be viewed as one entity for liability purposes.

  7. Subsidiaries Versus Sister Companies - Investopedia

    www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/031915/what...

    Jan 14, 2020 · Simply put, a subsidiary refers to a corporation that a parent company either fully owns or holds a controlling interest in. Conversely, sister companies refer to subsidiaries that are related...

  8. Subsidiary vs. Affiliate: What's the Difference?

    www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/06/subsidiaries.asp

    Jul 05, 2020 · A subsidiary is a company whose parent company is a majority shareholder that owns more than 50% of all the subsidiary company's shares. Affiliate is used to describe a company with a parent...

  9. The Difference Between a Subsidiary vs. a Wholly Owned Subsidiary

    www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/032615/what...

    Jun 28, 2020 · A subsidiary is a separate legal entity for tax, regulation, and liability purposes. Parent companies can benefit from owning subsidiaries because it can enable them to acquire and control...

  10. What Is a Parent Company Subsidiary Relationship?

    www.upcounsel.com/parent-company-subsidiary...

    Typically, a parent company is created when a company purchases a controlling amount of voting stock in another company. Usually, a parent company is a large company that owns a smaller company. The subsidiary company can be in the same industry as the parent company or can be in a related industry.

  11. Holding Company Definition

    www.investopedia.com/terms/h/holdingcompany.asp

    Jul 06, 2020 · A holding company is a type of financial organization that owns a controlling interest in other companies, which are called subsidiaries. The parent corporation can control the subsidiary's...