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    What is the genus and species of nightshade?

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  2. List of Solanum species - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Solanum_species

    This is a list of species in the plant genus Solanum.There may be up to approximately 1500 species worldwide. With some 800 accepted specific and infra-specific taxa of the more than 4,000 described, the genus Solanum contains more species than any other genus in the family Solanaceae and it is one of the largest among the angiosperms.

  3. Solanum - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solanum

    Solanum species show a wide range of growing habits, such as annual and perennials, vines, subshrubs, shrubs, and small trees. Many formerly independent genera like Lycopersicon (the tomatoes) and Cyphomandra are now included in Solanum as subgenera or sections. Thus, the genus today contains roughly 1,500–2,000 species

  4. Solanum Plant Family: Information About Solanum Genus

    www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/vgen/...

    Apr 04, 2018 · The Solanum family of plants is a large genus under the family umbrella of Solanaceae that includes up to 2,000 species, ranging from food crops, such as the potato and the tomato, to various ornamentals and medicinal species. The following entails interesting information about the Solanum genus and types of Solanum plants.

  5. Nightshade | plant genus | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/plant/nightshade

    Nightshade, (genus Solanum), genus of about 2,300 species of flowering plants in the nightshade family (Solanaceae). The term nightshade is often associated with poisonous species, though the genus also contains a number of economically important food crops, including tomato (Solanum lycopersicum),

  6. Solanaceae - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solanaceae

    The name Solanaceae derives from the genus Solanum, "the nightshade plant". The etymology of the Latin word is unclear. The name may come from a perceived resemblance of certain solanaceous flowers to the sun and its rays. At least one species of Solanum is known as the "sunberry".

  7. Tomato - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomato

    In 1753, Linnaeus placed the tomato in the genus Solanum (alongside the potato) as Solanum lycopersicum. In 1768, Philip Miller moved it to its own genus, naming it Lycopersicon esculentum . [16] This name came into wide use, but was technically in breach of the plant naming rules because Linnaeus's species name lycopersicum still had priority.

    • S. lycopersicum
    • Solanum
  8. list of plants in the family Solanaceae | Genera & Species ...

    www.britannica.com/topic/list-of-plants-in-the...

    Angel’s trumpet, (genus Brugmansia), genus of seven species of small trees and shrubs in the nightshade family (Solanaceae). Angel’s trumpets are commonly grown as ornamentals in frost-free climates and in greenhouses, and several attractive hybrids have been developed.

  9. Plants Profile for Solanum lycopersicum (garden tomato)

    plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=SOLY2

    Genus: Solanum L. – nightshade Species: Solanum lycopersicum L. – garden tomato Subordinate Taxa. The Plants ...

  10. Phylogeny | Solanaceae Source

    solanaceaesource.org/content/phylogeny-0

    With an estimated 1400 species, Solanum is the largest genus in the Solanaceae and one of the largest genera of flowering plants.Molecular phylogenetic analyses have established that the formerly segregate genera Lycopersicon, Cyphomandra, Normania, and Triguera are nested within Solanum, and all species of these four genera have been transferred to Solanum.

  11. The Genus Solanum: An Ethnopharmacological, Phytochemical and ...

    www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6426945

    Over the past 30 years, the genus Solanum has received considerable attention in chemical and biological studies.Solanum is the largest genus in the family Solanaceae, comprising of about 2000 species distributed in the subtropical and tropical regions of Africa, Australia, and parts of Asia, e.g., China, India and Japan.