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  1. Indigenous Australians - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigenous_Australians

    It is generally believed that Aboriginal people are the descendants of a single migration into the continent, a people that split from the first modern human populations to leave Africa 64,000 to 75,000 years ago, although others support an earlier theory that there were three waves of migration, most likely island hopping by boat during ...

  2. When did Aboriginal people first arrive in Australia?

    theconversation.com/when-did-aboriginal-people...

    Aug 06, 2018 · Aboriginal Australians have effectively been on their country for as long as modern human populations have been outside of Africa. We have a limit as to how long ago that was: around 50,000 years.

  3. Aboriginal Australians, facts and information

    www.nationalgeographic.com/culture/people/...

    Jan 31, 2019 · Aboriginal Australians could be the oldest population of humans living outside of Africa, where one theory says they migrated from in boats 70,000 years ago.

  4. Australian Aboriginal Migration | Cultural Survival

    www.culturalsurvival.org/publications/cultural...

    Australian Aborigine migration has a long history. In addition to traditional migratory patterns, various Aborigine groups and individuals migrated as a result of contact with Europeans. Early post-contact governments in Australia created reserves to which many Aborigines were "encouraged" to relocate. Other migrations, particularly as contact increased, were the result of Aborigines being ...

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  6. Australian Aboriginal peoples | History, Facts, & Culture ...

    www.britannica.com/topic/Australian-Aboriginal

    did you know? Leaving around 70,000 years ago, Australian Aboriginal peoples were some of the first humans to migrate out of Africa. Anthropologists recognize Australian Aboriginal peoples as possessing the longest continuing religion and art forms. Less than 3 percent of Australia's population today is made up of Australian Aboriginal peoples.

  7. Aboriginal Australians - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aboriginal_Australians

    Aboriginal Australians is a western term for the people who are from the Australian mainland and many of its islands, such as Tasmania, Fraser Island, Hinchinbrook Island, the Tiwi Islands, and Groote Eylandt, but excluding the Torres Strait Islands.

    • 30.3%
    • 5.5%
    • 4.6%
    • 3.9%
  8. Urban Migration of Indigenous Peoples in Canada | The ...

    www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/...
    • Analysis of Aboriginal Migration
    • Off-Reserve Growth Rates
    • Urban Aboriginal Institutions
    • Adaptations

    Specific data on rural to urban migration are generally lacking for the Aboriginal population; and most of the available information on their mobility patterns is based on census data. In a 1986 census analysis of Aboriginal migration, it was discovered that status Indians who have lived off-reserve had a greater propensity to change communities than the Aboriginal population who lived on-reserve. Among the Aboriginal groups, Aboriginal people and Métis had higher levels of off-reserve migration. According to the 1991 Aboriginal People's Survey, the proportion of adults who had ever moved sometime in their lifetime but not in the last 12 months was 61% for Aboriginal people currently living either on- or off-reserve or on settlements; this was 69% for the Métis. Of those who had ever moved, 41% of Aboriginal people and 48% of Métis reported that they had moved to their current residence from somewhere else in the same community, and 27% of Aboriginal people and 26% of Métis had move...

    The implementation of Bill C-31 in 1985 has contributed to the high growth rate of the off-reserve population since 1985, as many Aboriginals residing in off-reserve areas who had lost their Indian status could reclaim their ancestry. In 1985, a potential 76 000 women and their children who lost Indian status through marriage were eligible for reinstatement under the provisions of Bill C-31. As a result, over 100 000 people have been added to the Registered Indian population. According to the 1996 Indian Register, the off-reserve population increased from 147 424 in 1987 to 256 505 in 1996. The current distribution of the off-reserve population across Canada is as follows: 34% in the Atlantic region, 29% in Québec, 49% in Ontario, 39% in the Prairies, 49% in BC and 37% in the North. The expansion of medical, educational, housing and business services on reserves has supported the desire to maintain at least a nominal residence on a reserve. Many of these people are also trying to be...

    The development of urban Aboriginal institutions (Québec has a unique, more assimilating, urban pattern) can generally be identified in four categories: social services provided by the mainstream community; popular family-oriented kinship-friendship networks as Aboriginal people themselves take over social services such as court work, support for addictive behaviours and social work as needed; an elaboration of artistic, educational, political, recreational and religious voluntary associations; and the development of academic and professional services by Aboriginal people. More importantly, cultural creativity can be seen in the new kind of Aboriginal society that is developing in urban Canada. Mobility characterizes Aboriginal women more often than men and is noticeable in small northern communities. More young Aboriginal women migrate to urban centres than do men. Aboriginal women tend to go further in school and take lower-paying but steadier jobs than men, and make up 54% of the...

    Studies across the country show that housing shortages, increased population and the lack of jobs on the reserves are the most common reasons why Aboriginal people migrate to urban areas when they are young. Some urban Aboriginal people correspond and return regularly to their reserves while others settle permanently in the cities. Successful urban adaptations are related to several factors: the cultural background of individuals according to the traditional evolutionary level of their Aboriginal social heritage; historical elements such as the length and intensity of non-Aboriginal contact; the urban proximity of their communities; the local quality of receptivity such as the extent of anti-Aboriginal prejudice and discrimination; and the extent of involvement of urban Aboriginal institutions in the city they move to. A regional ranking of successful urban adaptations starts high with Québec, where few Aboriginal people leave reserves but are relatively well received when they do m...

  9. Aborigines: The First Out of Africa, the First in Asia and ...

    www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2011/09/...

    Sep 22, 2011 · The first genome analysis of an Aborigine reveals that these early Australians took part in the first human migration out of Africa. They were the first to arrive in Asia some 70,000 years ago ...

  10. When and how did ancestors of Australian aboriginal people's ...

    www.quora.com/When-and-how-did-ancestors-of...

    Jun 21, 2019 · The short answer (that glosses over some problems) is… * “around 50,000 years ago” and.. * “by mostly walking along the shoreline from north-east Africa to SE Asia, and then island hopping to northern Australia by raft”.

  11. Why Did Humans Migrate to the Americas? | Live Science

    www.livescience.com/7640-humans-migrate-americas...

    Jan 23, 2009 · People also migrate when they are being chased. Back then, there weren't enough people to cause civil unrest, tribal warfare, or religious persecution, but there could have been conflicts over ...