Yahoo Web Search

  1. About 55,800 search results

  1. Irish orthography is very etymological which can allow the same written form to result in multiple dialectal pronunciations and remain regular, e.g. ceann ("head") may result in [cɑun̪ˠ], [cɑːn̪ˠ], [can̪ˠ]. A spelling reform in the mid-20th century strengthened grapheme to phoneme correspondence by eliminating inter-dialectal silent letters.

  2. The four close vowel phonemes of Irish are the fully close /iː/ and /uː/, and the near-close /ɪ/ and /ʊ/. Their exact pronunciation depends on the quality of the surrounding consonants. /iː/ is realized as a front [iː] between two slender consonants (e.g. tír [tʲiːrʲ] 'country').

  3. People also ask

    What is Irish orthography based on?

    What is the official name of the Irish language?

    How do you spell Gaelic in Irish?

    What is the origin of Irish?

  4. Irish orthography is very etymological which can allow the same written form to result in multiple dialectal pronunciations and remain regular, e.g. ceann may result in [cɑun̪ˠ], [cɑːn̪ˠ], [can̪ˠ]. A spelling reform in the mid-20th century strengthened grapheme to phoneme correspondence by eliminating inter-dialectal silent letters. An Caighdeán Oifigiúil is the standard written ...

    • Thank You
    • Question?
    • Slight Problem with The Pronunciation Guide
    • Spelling Reform Section
    • Use of K
    • What Dialect Are The pronunciations Supposed to Be from?
    • Tengwar Mode For Irish
    • The Word Is
    • Irish Typeface Image
    • Question About Silent Vowels and Broad/Slender Consonants

    Thank you to whomever (plural of 'whomever' is?) wrote this. I have been looking for an explanation of the buailte online and I came upon this. You are all making a contribution to knowledge. Le gach dea-ghuí. Dunlavin Green (talk) 19:22, 5 May 2009 (UTC) 1. As the primary contributor to this page, and on behalf of the other editors of this page, y...

    Can we have an (rough) english equivalent for all of these? 79.75.64.248 (talk) 00:00, 17 July 2009 (UTC)

    I have only looked at the first few letters I'll admit, but I have already come across a few "errors" in pronunciation. The table shows bhf (broad) pronounced as a w and gives bhfuinneog as an example being pronounced as winn-yohg (obviously in IPA but ...). The problem with this is that it is more typically pronounced as vwinn-yohg in Munster and ...

    The new Spelling reform section says, "The Irish Texts Society's 1904 Irish–English bilingual dictionary by Patrick S. Dinneen used traditional spellings." But even Dinneen's dictionary uses some reformed spellings, such as sp and sc instead of sb and sg, -as instead of -us in words like solas, consistent use of éa instead of eu, and eo rather than...

    Though the Irish for kilometre is ciliméadar, it is always abbreviated as "km" on road signs. Can anyone say why, if there is no letter K? The article says - "k is the only letter not to be listed by Ó Dónaill." Is it bad Irish on the road signs, or did they think nobody would notice, or does nobody care anyway??86.42.192.214 (talk) 15:42, 29 May 2...

    Most examples are given with only one pronunciation, and there's no mention of whether it's supposed to be the “standard” one, the most common one, or the one from a particular dialect. For example, it says ao is pronounced /eː/ in the word aon /eːn̪ˠ/ "one" and its derivatives – well, Foclóir Póca says aon is /i:n/, and there are dialects where ao...

    In the forthcoming edition of The Hobbit in Irish a Tengwar mode for Irish will be published. Would a description of this be out of scope for the present article? -- Evertype·✆12:18, 16 March 2012 (UTC) 1. I'd think so. In fact, I doubt it would meet the general notability guideline for inclusion in Wikipedia, unless it "has received significant co...

    I don't speak Irish, I've just read a few things about it. I wonder why the word is is pronounced with an [s] instead of [ʃ]. Shouldn't it be [ɪʃ], since i is a slender consonant? - So is it an exception? Are there more? And could they be listed? Thanks. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 82.83.205.123 (talk) 17:39, 13 May 2013 (UTC) 1. Yes, is ...

    This is a low-quality image. The edges of the letters are not smooth, and the letter "names" use some sort of quasi-phonetic spelling. It looks it was put together in an old version of Microsoft Paint. It would be nice if someone redid it. I was thinking particularly of User:Evertype, but if someone else has the necessary typeface (I don't), by all...

    Have the silent vowels that indicate broad/slender been inserted to indicate this, or were they originally really there, affecting the consonants, and have these vowels subsequently been lost? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 82.139.82.82 (talk) 21:41, 7 July 2015 (UTC) 1. It's a mixture of both, but mostly they were inserted to indicate slend...

  5. Jul 10, 2022 · Irish or­thog­ra­phy is very et­y­mo­log­i­cal which can allow the same writ­ten form to re­sult in mul­ti­ple di­alec­tal pro­nun­ci­a­tions and re­main reg­u­lar, e.g. ceann ("head") may re­sult in [cɑun̪ˠ], [cɑːn̪ˠ], [can̪ˠ].

  6. Irish ( Standard Irish: Gaeilge ), also known as Gaelic, [6] [7] [8] is a Goidelic language of the Insular Celtic branch of the Celtic language family, which is a part of the Indo-European language family.

  1. People also search for