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  1. Potamogeton - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potamogeton

    Potamogeton is a genus of aquatic, mostly freshwater, plants of the family Potamogetonaceae.Most are known by the common name pondweed, although many unrelated plants may be called pondweed, such as Canadian pondweed (Elodea canadensis).

  2. Potamogeton crispus - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potamogeton_crispus

    Potamogeton crispus, the curled pondweed or curly-leaf pondweed, is a species of aquatic plant native to Eurasia but an introduced species and often a noxious weed in North America Contents 1 Description

  3. Potamogeton praelongus - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potamogeton_praelongus
    • Overview
    • Description
    • Taxonomy
    • Distribution
    • Ecological Requirements and Conservation
    • Cultivation

    Potamogeton praelongus Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Clade: Tracheophytes Clade: Angiosperms Clade: Monocots Order: Alismatales Family: Potamogetonaceae Genus: Potamogeton Species: P. praelongus Binomial name Potamogeton praelongus Wulfen Synonyms Potamogeton acuminatus Wahlenb. Potamogeton flexuosus Wredow Potamogeton flexuosus Schleich. Spirillus praelongus Nieuwl. Potamogeton praelongus, commonly known as whitestem pondweed in North America and Long-stalked Pondweed in Britain, i

    Long-stalked pondweed has tall stems to 3 m growing from stout, rusty-spotted perennial rhizomes. The stems often change direction between each node, giving a characteristic zig-zagging pattern. The transparent pale to deep green leaves are typically between 60 and 150 mm long but occasionally reach 250 mm and are 14–40 mm wide. The stipules are persistent, open, whitish and translucent, with prominent veins when dry. Floating leaves and turions are absent. The inflorescences are produced ...

    Long-stalked pondweed was first described in 1805 by the German taxonomist Franz von Wulfen. The specific epithet means 'very long'. It is not a particularly variable species and consequently there are few synonyms. Potamogeton praelongus sits within series Potamogeton, which includes other broad-leaved species such as P. alpinus and P. perfoliatus.

    Potamogeton praelongus has a Holarctic distribution, occurring in northern Europe, Greenland, Asia, North America. There are outlying populations in the Caucasus, Pyrenees and western USA.

    P. praelongus requires clear, deep water with at least some basic influence, and rarely grows in water less than 1 m deep. In Britain is usually found in lakes with limestone, marl or basalt geology, and it is absent from acidic lakes such as are common in Wales. It also occurs i

    Long-stalked pondweed is relatively sensitive to eutrophication and declines or local extinctions of this species have been associated with increased nutrent levels. In Loch Leven, P. praelongus was lost due to eutrophication during the mid 20th century, but has recently reappear

    P. praelongus is not in general cultivation, though it is an attractive plant. Unlike many other pondweeds it remains wintergreen. In common with other pondweeds of this group it roots poorly from stem cuttings and is best propagated by division of the rhizomes. Its preference for relatively deep water and intolerance of turbid conditions may make it unsuitable for many garden ponds. If possible it should be grown in water at least 70 cm deep on a sandy, peaty or silty substrate. Good water qual

  4. Potamogeton polygonifolius - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potamogeton_polygonifolius
    • Overview
    • Description
    • Distribution
    • Ecology and conservation
    • Cultivation

    Potamogeton polygonifolius Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Clade: Tracheophytes Clade: Angiosperms Clade: Monocots Order: Alismatales Family: Potamogetonaceae Genus: Potamogeton Species: P. polygonifolius Binomial name Potamogeton polygonifolius Pourr. Potamogeton polygonifolius or bog pondweed, is an aquatic plant. It is found in shallow, nutrient-poor, usually acid standing or running water, bogs, fens and occasionally ditches.

    Bog pondweed is a perennial, growing from creeping rhizomes. The stems are up to 0.7 m long, terete and unbranched. The submerged leaves are long and fairly narrow, delicate and translucent with long petioles, tending to decay rather early in the season, typically once the floating leaves appear. The floating leaves are opaque, 40-105 x 15–70 mm, usually brownish or dark green in colour with a pink tint when young, with inconspicuous secondary veins. There are no turions. The ...

    Potamogeton polygonifolius is mainly restricted to western Europe. It is more localised in the rest of its range including Northern Iberia, Germany, mainland Italy, Sicily, southern Scandinavia, the Baltic states, the Balkans and eastern Europe. There are outlying populations in North Africa, Orkney, Shetland, the Faroes and Newfoundland, and fossils have been found in Russia. The taxonomic status of populations in the Himalayas requires confirmation. A record from China was based on a misidenti

    In Britain and Ireland, this is one of the commonest pondweeds, occurring in almost any wet or semi-wet oligotrophic and / or acidic habitat so long as flow is not too rapid. It may be found in lakes, slow-flowing rivers, ponds, ditches, seeps and among bog mosses. As its name suggests, it is common in areas of blanket bog but may also occur in secondary habitats such as unshaded drainage ditches in bogs and forest plantations. In British rivers it typically grows with other soft-water species s

    Bog pondweed is not in general cultivation, although it is easy to grow. Its preference for shallow water makes it very suitable for a garden pond, but it would probably be difficult to establish in high nutrient, hard water areas.

  5. People also ask

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  6. Potamogeton obtusifolius - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potamogeton_obtusifolius
    • Overview
    • Description
    • Taxonomy
    • Distribution
    • Ecology and conservation
    • Cultivation

    Potamogeton obtusifolius Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Clade: Tracheophytes Clade: Angiosperms Clade: Monocots Order: Alismatales Family: Potamogetonaceae Genus: Potamogeton Species: P. obtusifolius Binomial name Potamogeton obtusifolius Mert. & W.D.J.Koch Synonyms Buccaferrea obtusifolia Bubani Potamogeton divaricatus Wolfg. Potamogeton liljebladii Wallman ex Rchb. Potamogeton tataricus Less. Potamogeton reflexus A.Benn. Spirillus obtusifolius Nieuwl. Potamogeton obtusifolius, know

    Blunt-leaved pondweed grows annually from turions and seed, producing branching plants with slender, flattened stems that have well-developed nodal glands. The submerged leaves are long, rather grass-like, sessile, translucent leaves that are 48-85 mm long and 1.5–3.55 mm wide and pale green, often with a very marked reddish or brownish tinge and a pink tinge along the midrib. There are 1-2 lateral veins either side of the midrib. As the name suggests, the leaf tips are rather blunt ...

    Blunt-leaved pondweed was first described in 1823 by Franz Carl Mertens and Wilhelm Daniel Joseph Koch. The specific name obtusifolius means 'blunt-leaved'. It is related to other fine-leaved pondweeds such as P. friesii and P. pusillus. Wang et al., based on DNA analysis have suggested that P. obtusifolius may have arisen through hybridisation between P. compressus and P. pusillus.

    Potamogeton obtusifolius has a wide global distribution, occurring in North America, Europe, Asia.

    In Britain, P. obtusifolius occurs in a range of standing water habitats including ponds, ditches, canals and shallow lakes, favouring circumneutral or slightly acidic waters. It is strictly a lowland plant and rarely observed in running water, except where current speeds are very slow. Although widely distributed it has a patchy distribution and is not usually abundant at any individual site. Like other fine-leaved pondweeds, P. obtusifolius probably benefits from a certain amount of disturbanc

    Blunt-leaved pondweed is not presently in cultivation. Although its wide ecological tolerance suggests it may not be difficult to grow, it would probably require a deeper substrate than is usual in most ponds. It can also be grown in aquaria by anchoring the turions in sand or mud. It is also likely to compete poorly with other pond plants.

  7. Potamogeton alpinus - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potamogeton_alpinus
    • Overview
    • Description
    • Taxonomy
    • Distribution
    • Ecology and conservation
    • Cultivation

    Potamogeton alpinus Robust form of Potamogeton alpinus in a river in Russia. Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Clade: Tracheophytes Clade: Angiosperms Clade: Monocots Order: Alismatales Family: Potamogetonaceae Genus: Potamogeton Species: P. alpinus Binomial name Potamogeton alpinus Balb. Synonyms Buccaferrea rufescens Bubani Potamogeton alpinonatans F.W.Schultz Potamogeton annulatus Bellardi Potamogeton casparii Weyl Potamogeton microstachys Wolfg. Potamogeton montanensis Gand. Potamog

    Red pondweed is a perennial herb anchoring in the mud substrate via a creeping rhizome. It produces a cylindrical unbranched stem, up to 2.8 m in length. It has sessile lance-shaped submerged leaves that are typically 70–180 mm long and 10–25 mm wide with 4-7 lateral veins on either side and a slightly hooded apex, with an untoothed margin. Floating leaves may also be produced. The inflorescence is a spike of flowers a few centimeters long rising above the water surface. Turions are ...

    Potamogeton alpinus was described by the Italian botanist Giovanni Balbis in 1804. The species name means 'alpine'. Like many other pondweeds, the variability in growth form of P. alpinus in response to environmental conditions and across its geographical range has led to it accumulating a number of synonyms.

    Red pondweed is native to much of the Northern Hemisphere, including Asia, Europe, Greenland, Canada, and the northern United States, especially the Rockies.

    Potamogeton alpinus generally grows in neutral to mildly acid water bodies such as lakes, slow-moving rivers and streams, and ponds. P. alpinus needs a deep fine substrate such as sand, silt or peat to root in and appears to avoid exposed situations. It is, mainly restricted to fairly nutrient-poor waters. In European rivers, it is associated with high quality environments. In a large-scale study of the plant communities of 3447 British lakes, red pondweed was found in 169, with a preference for

    Potamogeton alpinus is not in widespread cultivation, and seems to be rather difficult to maintain, competing poorly with other pond plants. It is possible that this is related to its preference for a deep fine substrate. In common with other pondweeds of this group it roots poorly from stem cuttings and is best propagated by division of the rhizomes.

  8. Potamogeton is a genus of aquatic plants. They live in freshwater such as ponds and lakes. They part of the family Potamogentonaceae. Their common name is pondweed. The genus name means "river neighbor". They are also a food source for many fish and algae eaters.

  9. Potamogeton lucens - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potamogeton_lucens

    Potamogeton lucens, or shining pondweed, is an aquatic perennial plant native to Eurasia and North Africa. It grows in relatively deep, still or slow-flowing, calcareous freshwater habitats. It grows in relatively deep, still or slow-flowing, calcareous freshwater habitats.

  10. Kategori:Potamogeton – Wikipedia

    sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kategori:Potamogeton

    Artiklar i kategorin "Potamogeton" Följande 75 sidor (av totalt 75) finns i denna kategori.

  11. Potamogeton – Wikipédia, a enciclopédia livre

    pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potamogeton

    Esta página foi editada pela última vez às 11h22min de 21 de setembro de 2020. Este texto é disponibilizado nos termos da licença Atribuição-CompartilhaIgual 3.0 Não Adaptada (CC BY-SA 3.0) da Creative Commons; pode estar sujeito a condições adicionais.